Application Trends in Graduate Business Programmes

2017 gmac application trends web releaseThe latest GMAC's Application Trends Survey Report showcases that overall programmes in Europe, Canada, East and Southeast Asia, and India report growing volumes in 2017.

Larger programmes with 201 or more class seats are more likely to report application growth compared with small programmes. 73% of larger programmes reported increased aplication volume compared to 39% in case of smaller programmes with 50 or fewer class seats. The growth among the larger US programs is driven by a resurgence of domestic applications, offsetting declines in international applicants.

The data driven from the report indicate that US political climate has impact on international application volumes. Programmes in Europe and Canada are about twice as likely to report growth in international applicants compared with the US, 67% and 77% respectively. Across all program types, just 32% of US programmes report growing international application volumes in 2017 vs. 49% in 2016.

Overall, the 2017 report findings show that international applicants represent 57% of US application volumes, 70% of Canadian volume, 89% of European volume, 20% of East and southeast Asian volume, and less than one percent of Indian volume.

Additional key findings include:
  • Overall volume to the general part-time MBA programme has been stagnant or on the decline since the Great Recession. Part-time lockstep programs — in which students proceed through a classroom-based program as a group — have seen stronger application volumes than part-time self-paced programs, in which students set their own schedule in a flexible format.
  • Most graduate business programs expect to see employer sponsorship remain stable. About half (52%) of part-time, self-paced students are expected to receive employer support, as are 40% of executive MBA and 39% of part-time lock-step MBA students.
  • The level of experience that the applicant brings to the graduate business programme has remained relatively consistent in 2017 compared with five years ago. For example, the majority of full-time MBA applicants have between three and 10 years of experience; the majority of executive MBA applicants have 10 or more years of experience; and most online MBA applicants have six or more years of experience.
  • Among business masters programmes, applicants tend to have less than one year of work experience; the exception is the Master in Data Analytics candidate who tends to have more experience. 
To download GMAC’s 2017 Application Trends Survey Report and an overview of the survey methodology, visit: gmac.com/applicationtrends or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

Nearly 9 in 10 Companies Plan to Hire MBA Graduates in 2017

International hiring plans, especially for graduates of MBA and business master’s programmes, remain steady despite recent political uncertainty, according to the latest 2017 GMAC's Corporate Recruiters Survey Report, conducted in conjunction with EFMD and MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance (MBA CSEA).

2017 gmac corporate recruiters web releaseDespite the political uncertainty about the status of immigration and work visas in the United States and other parts of the world, companies are keen to hire graduates from this year’s MBA and business master’s programs, including international candidates,” said Sangeet Chowfla, GMAC president and CEO.

Most US companies (55%) either plan to hire (28%) or are open to hiring (27%) an international candidate in 2017 — up from 49% that had such plans last year. Globally, 86% of companies plan to hire recent MBA graduates this year, up from 79% that hired them in 2016. Demand for these MBA graduates is strongest in the United States and Asia-Pacific, where 9 in 10 companies plan to hire these candidates.

Moreover, nearly 3 in 4 responding start-ups (74%) plan to hire MBAs in 2017, up from 52 percent of these companies that hired MBAs last year.

Some additional key findings include:

  • A greater percentage of employers plan to hire business master’s graduates in 2017.
The largest increase in hiring demand compared with 2016 is seen in the share of companies that plan to hire Master in Management graduates; globally, 59% plan to hire recent Master in Management graduates, up nine percentage points from last year. Hiring demand for Master of Accounting and Master of Finance and graduates is projected to hold steady in 2017, with 42% of employers and 48% of employers reporting plans to hire them, respectively.

  • More than half of employers (52%) report they will increase starting salaries for new MBA hires in 2017 at or above the inflation rate.
A majority of European and US companies (57% and 51%, respectively) will maintain 2016 salary rates for new MBA hires in 2017. The projected median base starting salary for recent MBA graduates in the US in 2017 is US$110,000, up from a median of US$105,000 in 2016. This represents an 83% premium over recent bachelor’s-degree holders in the US, who can expect to receive a median starting salary of US$60,000 in 2017.

  • Communication skills rank highest among the skills employers consider most important.
Four of the top five skills employers seek in new hires include oral and written communication, listening skills, and presentation skills. Teamwork skills such as adaptability, valuing others’ opinions, ability to follow a leader, and cross-cultural sensitivity were among the top 10 most sought-after skills for new graduate business hires.

  • Employers more likely to offer internship opportunities to MBA students.
Sixty-five percent of employers globally and 74% of US employers plan to offer internships to MBA students in 2017. Just 27% of employers globally expect to offer internships to business master’s students this year.

GMAC conducted the 16th annual Corporate Recruiters Survey in February and March 2017 together with survey partners EFMD and MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance (MBA CSEA), in association with 97 participating graduate business schools. Survey findings are based on responses from 959 employers representing more than 628 companies in 51 countries worldwide. Two additional organisations, CEMS and RelishMBA, assisted with recruitment of survey participants.

Findings from the 2017 Corporate Recruiters Survey highlight the hiring intentions of companies and the skills sought from new hires. These findings provide business school graduates with insights into the labor market and provide companies with a tool to benchmark their plans against other organisations and industries.

To download GMAC’s 2017 Corporate Recruiters Survey Report and an overview of the survey methodology, visit: gmac.com/corporaterecruiters or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

EFMD Call for Participation in the 2016 GMAC Corporate Recruiters Survey

 2016 corporate recruiters survey

EFMD and GMAC are once again cooperating to carry out the Corporate Recruiters Survey (CRS). Since 2001, CRS data has provided a picture of the current employment landscape, gauged employer demand for MBA and master-level business graduates, and offered valuable insights into employer needs and trends across industries and world regions.

The survey is conducted by GMAC in partnership with EFMD and the MBA Career Services & Employer Association (MBACSEA).Screen Shot 2015 12 08 at 12.35.13

For the 2016 edition, there are two easy ways to participate:

- Option 1: You provide GMAC with the list of employers that recruit and hire students from your business school, and GMAC takes care of the rest.
- Option 2: You administer the survey directly to the employers that recruit and hire students from your business school using a unique URL that GMAC provides.

Participating schools receive exclusive access to the following:

- Interactive Data Report. A free online tool that lets survey participants examine findings in greater depth and conduct customized data searches by numerous variables including propensity and magnitude of hiring overall and by industry and company size, internship data, and salary data.
- Customized Benchmark Report Tool. This free online service gives participants the power to instantly generate benchmark reports for peer programs of their choosing.

The survey launches on February 10, 2016. Sign up your school to participate anytime from now until January 31, 2016 to be sure your school hears from the employers that recruit your students about their hiring projections and the skills they seek in business grads.

For more information, please visit a special webpage.

2015 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards: Apply Now!

emerald efmd banner

EFMD and Emerald Group Publishing seek to celebrate excellence in research by sponsoring the 2015 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards.

Award-winning entries will receive a cash prize of €1,500 (or currency equivalent), a certificate and a winners' logo to attach to correspondence. In addition, a number of Highly Commended Awards will be bestowed. This year there are seven categories:

·         Operations and production management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Operations & Production Management
·         Logistics and supply chain management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management
·         Educational leadership and strategy
Category sponsored by Journal of Educational Administration
·         Management and governance
Category sponsored by Management Decision
·         Human resource management
Category sponsored by Personnel Review
·         Leadership and organization development
Category sponsored by Leadership & Organization Development Journal
·         Health Care Management
Category sponsored by Journal of Health Organization and Management

You can check out the 2014 Winners (and earlier years) here and this year's closing date for applications is 15 January 2016.

The entries will be judged by the Editor(s) and at least one Editorial Advisory Board member of theEmerald logo.jpg sponsoring journal.

Entries will be judged on the following criteria: Significance/implications for theory and practice, Originality and innovation, Appropriateness and  application of the methodology, and Quality of data/research.

All details on the 2015 ODRA's as well as a FAQ can be found here. The application form is here.

“Best of the Best” - Overall Winner of the EFMD Case Writing Competition

case writting competition winner IMD
After a very careful evaluation of all the winning cases of the 2014 edition of the EFMD Case Writing Competition, “J.M.Huber: A Family of Solutions” was chosen as the “Best of the Best” - the overall winner of the EFMD Case Writing Competition! The case is written by Benoit Leleux and Anne-Catrin Glemser, both at IMD.

"The J.M. Huber case is excellently written. It is fascinating to read, charting the development of a business with roots back to 1765 in Germany, to its beginnings in the U.S.A in 1883 and its continual development into the fascinating, values-based family business that it is today. It also serves as a case on general strategy and business development over time"
, wrote the selection committee comprised of Gay Haskins, Anders Aspling and Richard McCracken.

imdThe case is extremely well researched and provides great teaching and learning opportunities. The teaching note is thorough and fully meets its objective of providing superb opportunities to discuss fundamental family business issues in an integrated and original manner.

In unearthing the scenario, developing the relationship and then analysing and writing the history as a story engaging - and relevant to - a wider audience, the winning case is a perfect illustration of a great case author's skill in combining academic research, analysis and rigour with a strong narrative style.

Moreover, the “Family Business category” is a type of business at times neglected in business school programmes, despite the huge number of family businesses around the globe.

The judges' task in selecting a winning case was made both more difficult and more pleasurable by the very high standard of the cases under consideration. The judges welcomed the breadth of cultural and industrial scenarios reflected in the cases and were struck by the high quality of research and writing. We commend all the entrants for the quality of their work. It took an exceptional case to win in such company.

Many congratulations to the authors for this outstanding contribution to the management education body of knowledge. The 2014 Case Writing Competition has first rate winning cases across all categories. Several of the cases could have been worthy winners of the overall award as “Best of the Best”, said Eric Cornuel, EFMD Director General and CEO.

Benoit Leleux and Anne-Catrin Glemser, the authors of the winning case, added: “We are very honored and proud to receive this prestigious acknowledgement. It has been a great journey for us to unveil the unique ways in which J.M. Huber Corporation unites family interests with those of its businesses and combines tradition and innovation while demonstrating resilience and commitment since its founding in 1883. We hope this case will provide a rich platform for other family-owned or controlled businesses to discuss best practices, stimulate dialogue and learn from each other. It should also be relevant for non-family businesses to discuss values-based cultures, policies favoring broad inclusion, leading-edge governance processes and the management of a diversified portfolio of industrial activities”.

This year's "Best of the Best" was submitted in the category "Family Business".

Winners in the other categories include: IBS Hyderabad, IE Business School, Indian School of Business, INSEAD, Kellogg School of Management, L.N. Welingkar Institute of Management Development and Research, Middlesex University Dubai, Richard Ivey School of Business, Rotterdam School of Management, Singapore Management University, University of Regina, University of Waterloo.

For more information on categories and submission opportunities, please consult the dedicated EFMD Case Writing Competition website.

The upcoming submission deadline is 30 October 2015.

Inclusive Business Models: Three Good Practice Cases in India and Ethiopia

imdCase2014winner logo“Inclusive Business Models” is about commercially viable models that include the poor on the demand side as customers, and on the supply side as employees or business owners at various points in the value chain.  This category in the EFMD annual Case Writing Competition  is sponsored by IMD and the 2014 winner is:
Gillette’s “Shave India Movement”: Razor Sharp against the Stubble”. Two cases written by: Christopher Dula, Srinivas Reddy, and Adina Wong, all three at Singapore Management University, SG

Case A begins in April 2010, where Sharat Verma, the brand manager for Gillette India, together with Harish Narayanan, the assistant brand manager in the Singapore regional business unit, influence an R&D effort to redesign the Gillette Mach3 razor for the Indian market. By focusing on frugal innovation, they succeed in removing non- essential features of the razor design in order to reduce costs, thereby aligning the value proposition and price-point to the target segment. In addition, they also help develop an unconventional marketing campaign, called the “Shave India Movement”, which catalyses the previously unresponsive yet more affluent urban market, and results in record breaking sales for the Mach3 razor in 2010.

SMU logoCase B begins in May 2010 with Sharat Verma wondering how he can extend the “Shave India Movement” from the urban elite down to consumers at the bottom of the affluence pyramid through a new product, the Gillette Guard — set to launch five months later in October. This new product is designed specifically for low-income consumers in India. With the price-point and distribution dilemma already solved vis-à-vis the successes of the Mach3 campaign discussed in Case A, he now needs to craft an activation strategy that will extend the Shave India Movement to all rungs of society.

Also the winning cases from the previous years in the “Inclusive Business Models” category may be of interest to you.

Child in Need Institute: Non-Profit or Hybrid?”, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, India. The case features CINI, a reputable NGO with a mission of “sustainable development in education, protection, child health, adolescent and women in need”.  It focuses on the directors’ assignment to recommend whether the organisation should continue (after 37 years) as a NGO or should venture into social business.

 “Planting the seeds of change: The Ethiopia Commodity Exchange”, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
This case illustrates the challenging journey of Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin and her team to realize her dream of establishing a transparent and efficient commodity exchange in Ethiopia. The authors describe the integrative approach that provided market institutions to grade quality and set standard, to warehouse and issue warehouse receipts, relay market information to all the relevant actors, coordinate trading, as well as to ensure reliable payment, delivery, and contract enforcement.

You can also consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories that is on the EFMD website, and submit cases  for the next EFMD Case Writing Competition.

Case Studies on Euro-Mediterranean Management Styles

Montpellier logoCase2014winner logoTheoretical and practical approaches of the Euro-Mediterranean style of management are at the core of this category in the EFMD Case Writing Competition, sponsored by Groupe Sup de Co Montpellier Business School

Rosa Vaño And Castillo De Canena” is the 2014 winner in the “Euro-Mediterranean Managerial Practices and Issues” category.  The case is written by Rosario Silva and Custodia Cabanas, both at IE Business School.

The case summarizes the evolution of the family business Castillo de Canena Olive Juice. This company started operations in 2003 when its founders decided to give up their professional careers in large multinational companies and launch a new company within the existing family business. The case, focused on the role that Rosa Vañó plays in this evolution, explains the process that was followed in order to set up the competitive strategy, the steps that were taken to carry it out and the development of her leadership style.
In the final part of the case, Rosa Vañó describes three options for the future: (1) gradual internal growth, (2) massive growth with the financial help of investors, and (3) to sell the company.

ie logoTo get a better idea of this case study, please watch the 4 minute intro video.

Also the winning cases from the previous years in the “Euro-Mediterranean” category are probably of interest to you.

HPS, a successful South/North Technology Transfer Model”, ESCA School of Management, Morocco. This case discusses HPS, a Moroccan company and provider of high tech electronic money solutions ranked among the 15 world providers of electronic payment systems.  The case provides a practical reading grid to better encompass the main corporate strategy concepts.

 “Experience-Wine.com: The Monte Lauro Vineyards Story", Bentley University, United States. This case describes an innovative business model offering wine and a French cultural experience to North Americans. The authors primarily focus on innovation management.

You may also be interested to consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories that is on the EFMD website, as well as details for the EFMD Case Writing Competition in general. 

The Best Cases on Supply Chain Management as Competitive Advantage

kedge logoCase2014winner logoWith the aim of encouraging the writing of case materials, EFMD has been organising its annual Case Writing Competition.The category “Supply Chain Management” is sponsored by Kedge Business School and the 2014 winning case is:

Vanderlande Industries: Parcel And Postal Predicaments”, written by Rene de Koster and Philip Lazar, Rotterdam School of Management, NL.

VanderLande Industries (VI) was a strong global player in the distribution, parcel and postal (DPP) automation market, providing fully automated systems for parcel and posting sorting centers. VI’s product line had always remained strictly customer-centric, with every product built from scratch according to the customer’s wishes, but with increasing market pressure from new market entrants offering faster and lower-cost standardized solutions, the firm was seriously considering altering its market-responsive, service-focused and integrated product offerings towards a more efficient, modular and standardized output.

rsmThis case describes the frameworks and knowledge related to the first set of large-scale, modular and standardized repeated projects that VI had offered. VI hoped to leverage its knowledge and experience accumulated from these projects and replicate the new approach in many future projects. However, VI’s infrastructure was not suitable for such a transition: the firm was entirely organized around customer-specific projects and employees were used to work for individual customers. Jan Hulsmann, managing director of VI’s DPP division, was struggling to find a way to re-organize the division so that it could be both cost efficient and customer attentive.

This case develops and highlights the considerations involved in choosing an appropriate strategy for product offerings. The case describes the difficulties in overcoming the trade-offs between service and efficiency, integration and modularity, and efficient and market responsive supply chains, when designing or altering a product strategy. It delves into both the benefits as well as the downsides involved with different product strategy approaches, and attempts to make students think about what product strategy is most appropriate for what business and market context.

Also the finalist cases from last year may be of interest to you:

Cisco Systems: Supply Chain Risk Management”, IE Business School, Spain.
The case describes that when the tsunami on the Japanese coast occurred in March 2011, it affected the scope of Cisco’s extensive network of suppliers and facilities all over the world and activated a global complex mechanism with the main purpose of diminishing the tsunami’s effects on its supply chain. This case illustrates the peculiarities of Cisco’s supply chain and their internal and external vulnerabilities.

 “The Loewe Group: A New Industrial Model and Commitment to Lean Management?”, ISEM, Spain.
The cases deal with Loewe, a luxury leather goods manufacturer from Spain, that was acquired by the world´s leading luxury goods group, LVMH. The authors illustrate that operations management can be a very powerful source of competitive advantage and that manufacturing excellence can coexist with artisan traditions and values.

Recipes for Success - Innovating Production and Inventory Management of Pepper Oleoresin at Synthite”, Indian School of Business, India.
This case focuses on production and inventory management at Synthite, an oleoresin manufacturer in Kerala, India. The company faced several challenges in inventory management, production planning, and in meeting customer expectations on order lead times.

You are kindly invited to also consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories that is on the EFMD website, as well as details for the EFMD Case Writing Competition in general.
 

Top Cases on Reviewing Financial Policy at Infineon Technologies, Tumi and Apple

toulouse logoCase2014winner logoThis category in the EFMD Case Writing Competition, sponsored by Toulouse Business School – Groupe ESC Toulouse. 

Infineon Technologies: Time to Cash in Your Chips?” is the 2014 winner in the “Finance and Banking” category. It is written by Denis Gromb and Joel Peress, both at INSEAD, FR.

Set in late 2011, the case considers the cash holding and pay-out policy of Infineon (IFX), the large German semiconductor firm. Having just emerged from a period of distress and,restructuring, Infineon is sitting on a very large net cash position of €2.4bn, representing 40% of,its €5.9bn assets and €6bn in market capitalization. Much of this liquidity comes from a recent,surge in profits and the sale of the wireless communication unit. Infineon’s management has engaged in a review of its financial policy and has received conflicting advice from various quarters as to whether the company should part with some of its cash, how much, and through which payout method(s).

inseadThe first issue is whether Infineon benefits from holding onto substantial cash reserves. The characteristics of Infineon’s business post-restructuring are described: highly cyclical, capitalintensive, risky, intangible asset-based, etc. Hoarding cash offers a coarse but effective way to ensure continued investment through the cycle.

The second issue is which method for distributing cash Infineon should employ, assuming it does intend to disburse at least some of it. This is an opportunity to review leading methods for paying cash dividends and repurchasing shares, and how they relate to different rationales for paying out cash in the first place: adjusting the capital structure, exploiting mispricing, signalling, serving investor clienteles, etc.

Also the winning cases from the previous years in the “Finance and Banking” category may be of interest to you:
 
Tumi and the Doughty Hanson Value Enhancement Group”, IMD, Switzerland
The authors investigate some of the hottest issues in the private equity industry, in particular active ownership strategies; the current difficulties in managing exits, also known as the “portfolio constipation”; the progressive incorporation of corporate social responsibility agendas in the value creation plan of buyouts; and the relationship between private equity investors and the senior management of the company.

"Apple – Time to ‘Think Different™’ about cash?", Vlerick Business School, BE
This case explores Apple’s tax payments and investigates the company’s capital structure, cash position and dividend policy. All these elements have a significant impact on Apple’s value and on methods appropriate to gauge Apple’s valuation level.

Please do also consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories, it is on the EFMD website as well as details for the EFMD Case Writing Competition in general.

Critical Family Business Issues: Top Cases on Talent, Ownership, Growth and Communications

Case2014winner logoInter-disciplinary coverage of family business entrepreneurship related issues is at the core of the “Family Business” category of the EFMD Case Writing Competition. The 2014 winner in this category is:

J.M. Huber: A Family of Solutions”, written by Benoît Leleux, and Anne-Catrin Glemser, both at IMD, CH.

imdThe J.M. Huber case, based on extensive personal interviews with senior executives and family members of the J.M. Huber family business, one of the largest and oldest American family businesses, investigates the unique culture and governance structures and processes of the firm, its roots and the multiple forms of expression that enables it to survive and thrive over six generations and about as many fundamental strategic shifts (pivots) and repositionings. The following questions are explicitly addressed:

  • Can a family business culture be a “weapon to attract talent,” as stated by the CEO?;
  • What factors should be included and how should they be weighted in the recruitment of the next CEO? What kind of CEO profile should they target?;
  • How much should the family business continue to open up its communication, both internally (for family shareholders and family members) and externally (for broader stakeholder groups)?;
  • How does the Huber family instil a sense of purpose and a shared vision among its owners? In particular, how much are the various factors – the family principles and values, the Huber business principles and the Mike Huber Award – contributing?;
  • Where does the firm find the infamous “family glue” and how does it try to strengthen these bonds?;
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of inclusion, i.e. incorporating as many family members, including in-laws? Why are many family firms reluctant to adopt/resist an inclusive environment? What structures and processes has Huber adopted to facilitate inclusiveness?

Also the finalist cases from last year in the “Family Business” category may be of interest to you:

"Trusted Family: For Families, by Families, forever… "by IMD Switzerland
This video-case is an innovative and entertaining basis to discuss a number of critical family business issues, such as governance and the communication needs of large multi-generational family firms, entrepreneurship by next generation members, the brand value of family names, etc.

"The Future of AFG: How Family Attachment Influenced Growth", Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, NL.The case deals with a dilemma the Italian family firm AFG faced after making a significant investment to grow its business and the strategic decisions to be taken by the CEO.

Hermès, INSEAD, FR. This case follows the evolution of two distinct types of family-owned luxury houses. Hermès represents traditional excellence – with its low-key style, highest quality workmanship, and dependable designs. LVMH is a luxury conglomerate that grows by acquisition of designer labels. The authors explore the ownership battle between them.

You are most welcome to consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories is on the EFMD website, as well as details for the  EFMD Case Writing Competition in general.

Entrepreneurship: The Winning Cases from the EFMD Case Writing Competition

emlyonThe “Entrepreneurship” category of the EFMD Case Writing Competition is sponsored by EM Lyon and the 2014 winner in this category is: 

Jungle Beer: An Entrepreneur's Journey”, written by Christopher Dula and Kapil Tuli, both from Singapore Management University, SG.

This case follows Aditya Challa, a craft beer aficionado whose passion for good beer led him on an international quest to study the art of brewing in Scotland and eventually to Singapore, where he started a microbrewery business with his friends in 2011. By October 2012, sales of his craft beer have been increasing 20% per SMU logomonth, bringing up his production to about one third operating capacity.

However, future growth remains uncertain — with specific challenges in distribution and branding. Craft beer is still a relatively unknown concept in the city-state, and consumers remain sceptical of premium priced local beer. Moreover, big breweries in the Singapore market have already locked down most retailers with exclusive draft contracts. Challa has to review his business model and growth strategy in terms of how and where he can sell his beer while continuing to build the Jungle Beer brand.

Also the below winning cases from the previous years in the “Entrepreneurship” category may be of interest to you:

WooRank: Creating & Capturing Value in a European Web Start-Up, Solvay Brussels School of Economics & Management, BE. The cases examine a Belgian web start-up (WooRank) that develops and markets online tools for Search Engine Optimization (SEO) through to a Software as a Service (SaaS) model. The two case studies highlight the strategic and sales challenges.

Case2014winner logoLaastari: Building a Retail Health Clinic Chain, INSEAD, France. This case study presents an example of business model innovation in the context of primary care delivery. It documents the story of Laastari, a new IT-driven retail health clinic chain based in Finland, including the process that links conceptual strategy to implementation and practice, as well as the evolving stakeholder ecosystem of the company. 

You can consult the impressive list of winners for all 14 categories on the EFMD website, as well as details for the EFMD Case Writing Competition in general. With the aim of encouraging the writing of case materials, EFMD has been organising this annually for decades and this year saw a record number of 258 high quality entries.

Corporate Social Responsibility: Winning Cases on WWF, Hewlett-Packard, Accenture and Novo Nordisk

kedge logoCase2014winner logoWith the aim of encouraging the writing of case materials, EFMD has been organising its annual Case Writing Competition for over 40 years.  The category “Corporate Social Responsibility” looks for innovative ways companies are managing the demands for socially and environmentally responsible business practice.  This category is sponsored by Kedge Business School and the 2014 winner is:

WWF's Living Planet @ Work: Championed by HP”, written by Oana Branzei, Richard Ivey School of Business and Haiying Lin, University of Waterloo.

Leading up to the completion of a successful partnership between Hewlett-Packard Canada and World Wildlife Fund Canada, the two individuals who championed the program contemplate their separate and joint next steps: should their organizations renew or exit the partnership?

R IveySoB logoTogether, they had designed and delivered a world-first program, Living Planet @ Work, which had enrolled more than 500 companies, large and small, whose employees had already raised more than $1 million in charitable donations through workplace giving. The program was helping corporate Canada harness the collective desire and power of their employees for the good of business and the future of the planet. The two champions had a short window to go global and scale up the positive impact of the program.

Also the winning cases from the previous years in the “Corporate Social Responsibility” category may be of interest to you:

UWaterloo logoIn 2013, it was Accenture Development Partnership, by INSEAD France. Accenture Development Partnerships is a “not-for-loss” business unit established inside Accenture in 2003 to serve NGO and development sector clients.

The case provides an example of the effective development of a sponsorship network for securing buy-in for a new venture and illustrates the challenges of deciding how far a new venture should be separated from or integrated with the main business of the firm.

In 2012, it was Novo Nordisk: Managing Sustainability at Home and Abroad, by EM Lyon Business School in France.

This case was written to help students develop skills in analyzing the potential strategic purposes of sustainability when applied to a global business context. The case focuses both on internal organization issues in a multinational organization, as well as on how to develop a sustainability strategy in a highly competitive business context in China.

You can consult the full list of winners for all 14 categories is on the EFMD website, as well as details for the  EFMD Case Writing Competition in general.

Transnational Higher Education: Insights on Joint Programmes and Student Mobility

TransnatHE JointRussiaJoint Programmes between Higher Education Institutions of the European Union and Russian Federation
Joint Programmes are complex forms of collaboration. This report, co-authored by Nadine Burquel, EFMD Director Business School Services,  provides examples and checklists for action on how to overcome  challenges including legal restrictions, recognition issues, financial or organisational constraints, linguistic or cultural issues.

The 162-page report  highlights the  tremendous efforts put into teaching and learning cooperation in EU and Russian institutions. Several hundreds of programmes are covered and findings are structured around seven key dimensions:
  • Institutional partnership composition — Looser to more strategic partnerships
  • Programme design and delivery– Fragmented to real jointness
  • Student mobility paths — Ad-hoc to structured mobility paths
  • Recognition of study abroad — None, partial to full recognition
  • Degree types — Single (Joint), Double, Certificate
  • Programme management — From individual to institutional integrated arrangement
  • Quality assurance — Internal and external arrangement
General findings include:
  • EU-Russian Joint Programmes focus primarily on Management, Economics and Engineering, Manufacturing & Construction and are for the majority at the Master level.
  • German and French universities dominate in EU-Russian partnerships, followed by Finland and the United Kingdom.
  • In Russia, most Joint Programmes are found in Moscow, followed by St-Petersburg and Siberia.
  • Different lengths of studies in the EU and Russia create recognition problems.
  • Mobility is mainly for Russian students who travel to Europe.
For further details, please consult the 162-page report: Joint Education Programmes between Higher Education Institutions of the European Union and Russian Federation. Chapter 8 is dedicated to challenges and best practices:
  • The strength of internationalisation in partner universities
  • The lack of partners’ clear motives
  • Linguistic, cultural and legal limitations
  • Developing and establishing robust partnerships
  • Decisions at the level of programme integration and jointness
  • Creating opportunities, building brand and reputation
  • Financial constraints to ensure joint programmes’ long term sustainability
TransnatHE studentsStudent Mobility and Internationalisation
The 261-page report “Social and Economic Conditions of Student Life in Europe” presents the findings of the 5th round of the EUROSTUDENT project to which 30 countries of the EHEA have contributed between 2012 and 2015. It is a collection of key indicators on the social dimension of higher education and functions to monitor progress in the implementation of the Bologna Process reforms.  The synopsis focuses on three main topic areas: Access to higher education and characteristics of students; Study conditions; and International student mobility and future plans.

Chapter 10 examines students’ international mobility (realised and planned), obstacles to enrolment abroad, organisation and funding of enrolment abroad, and the recognition of credits earned abroad. As an indicator of internationalisation at home, the extent to which students’ national study programmes are taught in foreign language is examined. Results here indicate that:
  • International student mobility rates vary greatly by country; between 5 % and 39 % of students in the cross-sectional samples.
  • Enrolment abroad tends to be the most frequently realised foreign study-related experience.
  • Access to international student mobility can be shown to be subject to social selectivity.
  • The most critical of the analysed obstacles to studying abroad is the (perceived) additional financial burden.
  • A separation from partner, children, and friends has turned out to be the second most critical obstacle.
  • A large degree of variation across countries can also be observed regarding the organisation, funding and recognition of foreign enrolment periods.
For the full details, please go here.

Institutional Development of Business Schools

The book "The Institutional evelopment of Business Schools" provides novel empirical findings on the change and development of business schools, the causes and consequences of the ranking, and branding wars around business schools in particular and higher education systems more generally.

The book, edited by Andrew M.Pettigrew, Eric Cornuel and Ulrich Hommel, also offers a stimulating critique of some of the intellectual, professional and economic challenges facing business schools in the contemporary world, as well as concluding thoughts on “Building a Research Agenda on the Institutional Development of Business Schools”.  It has three main parts:
  • The Change and Development of Business Schools
  • Ranking and Branding of Business Schools
  • Challenges for the Future Development of Business Schools
You may also be interested to explore “Securing the Future of Management Education: Competitive Destruction or Constructive Innovation?". This "EFMD Perspectives" book (by H.Thomas, M.Lee, L. Thomas, A.Wilson) has most interesting chapters on:
  • Future scenarios for management education
  • Critical issues for the future: Unfolding gaps
  • Uncertain futures: What should business schools do now?
Of interest too may be The Business School in the 21st Century. This book is by H.Thomas, P.Lorange and J.Seth. In this book, three world experts share their critical insights on management education and new business school models in the USA, Europe and Asia, on designing the business school of the future, and how to make it work. They look at how the business school is changing and focus in particular on emergent global challenges and innovations in curricula, professional roles, pedagogy, uses of technology and organisational delineations. Set within the context of a wider discussion about management as a profession, the authors provide a systematic, historical perspective, analysing major trends in business school models, and reviewing a wealth of current literature, to provide an informed and unique perspective that is firmly grounded in practical and experimental analysis.

Also, please do check related recent articles from the EFMD Global Focus magazine:
"The socially responsible business school": David Oglethrope argues that business schools need to embrace social responsibility more enthusiastically than they have done so far.

"The new approach to growth and profitability that business schools need": Peter Lorange and Jimmi Rembiszewski argue that business schools must react more urgently to a new type of student.

2014 EFMD-Emerald Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards (Part Two)

emerald logoEFMD and Emerald Publishing announce with great pleasure the winners of the 2014 Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards. In this second listing of Winners and Highly efmd-newlogo2013-lr coloursCommended, we cover:

Leadership and Organisational Development, sponsored Leadership & Organization Development Journal

  • “Follow Me! Followership, Leadership and the Multigenerational Workforce”: Dr. Johnson, Winner from Nova Southeastern University
  • “Leadership, engagement, and workplace behaviors: The mediating role of psychological capital”: Dr. Robin, Highly Commended from The University of Melbourne

Management and Governance, sponsored by Management Decision

  • “Collaborative Resilience: The Multi-Level Structural of Organizational Kinship in Socioeconomic Collectives”: Dr. Randolph, Winner from University of Nevada Las Vegas

Human Resource Management, sponsored by Personnel Review

  • “Human Resource Management: Work-Family Reconciliation”: Dr. Glaveli, Joint winner from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
  • “The impact of HR differentiation on employees”: Dr. Marescaux, Joint winner from KU Leuven

Logistics and Supply Chain Management, sponsored by International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management

  • "The adaptation of Supply Chains to Climate Change": Dr. Kreie, Winner from Heriot-Watt University

Knowledge Management, sponsored by Journal of Knowledge Management

  • “The use of storytelling as transfer of knowledge”: Dr. Leung, Winner from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • “The hidden difference – Identity status, access of knowledge and the generation of new ideas”: Dr. Silberzahn, Highly Commended from IESE Business School

Health Care Management sponsored by Journal of Health Organisation and Management

  • “Health Systems Integration: Competing or Shared Mental Models?”: Dr. Evans, Winner from University of Toronto
  • "Bottom-up safety initiatives: a case study of falls preventon at a Portuguese hospital": Dr. Barbosa de Melo, Highly Commended from  Queen's University Belfast

Award-winning entries receive a cash prize of €1,500 and international recognition. Moreover, EFMD is particularly proud to see so may EFMD member institutions represented, the first six categories of the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards were covered in a first blog post and cover Educational leadership and strategy, Interdisciplinary accounting research, Marketing research, Information science, Hospitality management, as well as Operations and production management. You may also be interested in more details on the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards or you may want to consult the archives of previous winners.

How Being Embedded in your Region Helps Growth

GF14 3 BSISventThomas Bieger explains how the University of St.Gallen used the new Business School Impact Survey to consolidate and build on its local roots.

Imagine you are the chief executive of an airport whose customers are rather dispersed. Some of them live up to 100 miles away, which is true of a minimum of 40% of hub transfer passengers.Your main concern is your airport’s international positioning against the major hubs and their worldwide competition. Your main markets are international transfer passengers and international airlines. You therefore recruit top staff and specialists from an increasingly competitive international labour market.

However, access to local resources is key for the expansion of your airport, the local labour market, rail and road access, subsidies for those public services that your airport delivers and the development of neighbouring businesses. Simultaneously, the regional environment sees the negative impacts, such as direct externalities like noise; and many locals regard indirect externalities, such as the role of the airport as a representation of globalisation, as a threat.

Many companies with operations fixed to a specific location face similar challenges. They compete in international markets but have to combine their international reach – even their global reach – with their local and regional roots. They rely on local resources and regional and national laws regulate them.

BSIS SGallen logoThe same is true of business schools – not just traditional, campus schools but also multi-campus universities and virtual business schools offering pure e-learning
products. All of them need to nurture their local roots. For example, they need at least a legal local base to ensure accreditation. Further, they draw on the brand and image of their home base.

Compared to other institutions of higher education, business schools face a specific challenge regarding caring about this local “embeddedness” because:

  • their graduates work for global companies and not for the regional economy and society as do most medical doctors, lawyers and teachers that traditional comprehensive universities produce
  • to achieve their global ambition, they rely on the professors and leadership that the global faculty market provides
  • from the public’s point of view they are often those responsible for bad management practices and are even the source of economic crises. This is most predominant in respect of the best business schools in a country with a dominant market share. Many view these schools as embodying an ever-present risk that their alumni
  • will feature in tomorrow’s negative headlines about incompetent managers.

BSIS bannerAll of the above are reasons why the University of St Gallen in Switzerland has undertaken the Business School Impact Survey (BSIS) assessment process offered by EFMD Global Network and FNEGE (French National Foundation for Management Education).

The University of St Gallen’s vision is to establish and further its position in the worldwide university landscape. However, 20% of its overall financial budget originates from its region, the Canton of St Gallen, while only 10% of its students do.As one of 10 state universities in Switzerland, it is the only specialised
university whose graduates … please click to read more.

Going from EPAS to EQUIS and AACSB … and from AACSB to EPAS

GF14 3 AtoEAnne-Joëlle Philippart, from HEC-Liège, explains how the mix of EFMD and AACSB accreditation models helped achieve a rapid improvement of the quality assurance system at HEC-Liège.

HEC-Liège, the management school of the University of Liege, Belgium, is the result of the 2005 merger of two Liege business schools.The city of Liege has undergone profound industrial change focused on a shift from traditional heavy industries to innovative businesses and specialised technological industries. HEC-Liege has also rapidly developed as a proactive partner in regional economic development, launching a number of pioneering initiatives, encouraging entrepreneurship and enhancing the international dimension of the activities of its staff and students.

GF14 3 HECL logoIn 2009, the school launched a very proactive strategy to further increase its visibility, reputation and internationalism. One of the main pillars of this strategy was to obtain several international accreditations. The HEC-Liege Board of Directors also launched an international search that led to the recruitment of a new Dean, Thomas Froehlicher. It also decided to appoint a full-time Quality Manager.

The objective was to obtain a programme accreditation under EFMD’s EPAS standards as a start to a school accreditation under the AACSB and EQUIS (also EFMD) standards. Both EFMD and AACSB proposed very complementary models. The first step was to involve our stakeholders, both internal and external. The involvement of internal stakeholders ensures an institutional ownership of the process and implementation of a quality culture, oriented to continuous improvement. The involvement of external stakeholders helps the school to connect with market needs.

epasThe EPAS accreditation model is built around programme design, programme delivery and programme outcome. It is backed by a Quality Assurance System and framed by the institutional context. This model helped us to structure our activities. The main achievements were the writing of a quality manual and the setting up of a programme management system around the intended learning outcomes (ILOs).

The writing of the quality manual started with an analysis of our organisation. This has allowed us to rationalise and disseminate our processes and procedures. The ILO process started with a broad programme review relating to, on one hand, our main research fields and, on the other, our corporate dimension and the market’s needs.

Wide-ranging consultations were carried out with faculty, staff, alumni, students and employers. These meetings have created a team spirit and a sense of belonging to the school.

As regards programmes, we defined a graduate profile documented by about 15 measurable ILOs. Each professor was asked to determine which programme ILOs were addressed by her or his lectures. They also had to determine which pedagogical methods and which assessment methods they were using and then list them in pedagogic commitments published on the school web site.

A clear definition of programme ILOs has many advantages and serves students, programme directors, faculty and recruiters. Each one better understands the others’ expectations, favouring mutual adjustments and resulting in good teamwork between faculty members.

Every year the Quality Department carries out an analysis of each programme, checking … please click to read more.

From Great to Gone - Lessons for Business Schools

GF14 3 potloodPeter Lorange and Jimmi Rembiszewski argue that business schools must react more urgently to a new type of student.

Evidence from business suggests that we are faced with an entirely new class of consumers – the IT-fluent multitaskers – and that these may require a different set of innovations behind the products and services they appreciate – prestige brands and quality rather than low cost.

In addition, the way of communicating with this group of consumers is different – via social media rather than traditional ads in printed media and on TV. We have documented this in our new book "From Great to Gone", Gower, 2014.

There are also lessons here for business schools. Today’s emerging student is analogous to the new consumer – IT-literate and with more focus on quality and relevance rather than on low cost, though often they are looking at and comparing subsidised public-sector offerings.

This breed of new student typically combine studies with their full-time jobs – and so demand flexibility and modularity in curricula and more extensive use of IT-based studies of the basics at home. For example, some courses may be taken entirely via MOOCS and others at various, different, business schools.

GF14 3 great2goneRelevant innovations, as seen through the eyes of this emerging group of students, would have to focus on what they see as “cutting-edge”, both from a theoretical point of view as well as practical relevance. Typical emerging offerings might be cross functional as, for example, the new inter-face between finance/behavioural sciences/IT or between strategy and behavioural sciences or between marketing and product development. Innovation in both research and pedagogy will also be called for.

Coming up with irrelevant innovations, on the other hand, can often lead to a worsening of an academic institution’s performance. The modern student expects to discuss emerging key current dilemmas in class – learning from fellow students as well as from faculty. Basics, on the other hand, most modern students are ready to study at home via IT-based learning and support.

We identify three specific innovations that tend to be appreciated by modern students and executive participants in business school programmes: relevance; pedagogy; and flexibility.

Relevance: What is important is to be able to offer modern students/participants the most relevant offerings, ideally of the types that they may apply in their professional lives. Such cutting-edge offerings might typically be delivered by a relatively broad spectrum of experts/lecturers – not only academic professors but also consultants and practitioners. Typically these come from many sources and to rely primarily on in-house professors would tend to lead to a too-narrow set of offerings, which are often also more or less out of date.

Pedagogy: Relatively small classes focusing primarily on current dilemmas can create a significant increase in what is being learned.The classroom typically has a level floor with participants seated around tables of about seven individuals with a maximum of five tables.The professor provides an opening lecture of some 20 minutes with a maximum of five visual aids. The tables of participants/students then debate the issues for about 20 minutes followed by another 20 minutes of plenary discussion under the leadership of the professor. Experience indicates that in two days spent this way one might be able to cover up to perhaps five days of traditional learning. Please click to read more.

This article was recently published in EFMD's Global Focus magazine. You can read the issue for free via the EFMD Library on Issuu or access the tablet versions via iTunes and Google Play.

Social Interpreneurship and The Jazz Age

GF14 3 jazzSocial intrapreneurs are rarely individual heroes but more like jazz musicians jamming in a group. But sometimes, say David Grayson, Melody McLaren and Heika Spitzeck, they need even bigger groups – a fully orchestrated ‘big band’.

A new order of business social innovators is emerging. Canadian author Anne Kingston, citing research by ad agency Sparks and Honey, recently noted key differences between two young groups.

Generation Z – those born since 1995, now 18 and under and who number about two billion worldwide – have a highly developed social conscience. Sixty per cent want jobs that create social impact compared to 31% of Generation Y (also known as “Millennials”), born between the 1980s and 2000. They are also more entrepreneurial (72% want to start their own businesses) and even more tolerant of racial, sexual and generational diversity than Generation Ys, who are a significantly socially conscious cohort in their own right, according to the 2014 Deloitte Millennials survey .

In 2012 the star Generation Z inventors who made headlines included 15-year-old Jack Andraka, who created an inexpensive, accurate sensor able to detect pancreatic cancer; and 17-year-old student Angela Zhang, who developed a protocol that allowed doctors to better detect cancerous tumours on MRI scans. Last February, 16-year-old Ann Makosinski claimed the top prize for 15- to 16-year-olds at the Google Science Fair, a place on Time’s “Top 30 under 30” list, as well as a barrage of media coverage for her flashlight, powered by the heat of a human hand. This had been inspired by the plight of a friend in the Philippines who had failed a grade at school because she lacked electricity to study at night.

GF14 3 jazz bookAlthough far younger than their counterparts currently enrolled in business schools, the emergence of these socially conscious, entrepreneurial Generation Zs represents the crest of a wave of business-based social innovation that we have seen building in our research on social intrapreneurism, which we published in our March 2014 book, Social Intrapreneurism and All That Jazz. Please click to read more on:

  • What are “social intrapreneurs” and why study them?
  • What do social intrapreneurs do?
  • How did they succeed in spite of the challenges?

You can read or download the full EFMD Global Focus magazine issue for free via the EFMD Library on Issuu or access the tablet versions via iTunes and Google Play.

Strategic Leadership and New Ways of Working to Drive Growth – the UniCredit Approach

GF14 3 RutschAndrew Rutsch explains how Italian banking group UniCredit turned to strategic leadership and new ways of working in a bid to drive organisational growth.

In today’s fast-paced environment, organisations and even whole industries are challenged with seismic shifts. Companies such as Kodak, Merrill Lynch and General Motors, once industry icons, are now bankrupt, acquired or stumbling.

Against this background, the recent EFMD CLIP Sharing Best Practice Workshop hosted by Italian banking group UniCredit in Turin, Italy, in March at its inspirational UniManagement corporate learning center showcased a variety of approaches and practices that drive development outcomes.

A larger theme emerged during the day-long workshop: the role and impact of strategic leadership and new ways of working in the pursuit of organisational growth. Put more concretely, this focused on how UniCredit’s senior management engages organisational members and clients around shared goals and needs to drive collective development and performance.

Banking is not anymore what it used to be
The banking sector has undergone substantial changes accelerated by the financial and economic crisis of recent years – and is expected to continue doing so. In particular, a number of drivers have affected banking:

  • increasingly strict regulations by governments and transnational bodies
  • greater competition through globalising banks that drive market consolidation
  • socio-demographic changes through the arrival of Generation Y with its new values
  • new technologies that are reshaping how organisations are steered and operated

For example, the World Retail Banking Report 2014 by Capgemini and Efma found (for the first time in three years) a decline in customer experience. This was particularly true among Generation Y members, who comprise up to a third of the population in many markets, who value technology and who represent the largest user base of social media. It is a wakeup call for banks to rethink how they use technology in building a personalised customer relationship.

Given these market shifts, banks have to adapt their value chains to increase their responsiveness. They are reworking services, channels and systems to increase interaction with all value chain partners from suppliers and customers to media and regulatory bodies. Against this background, MIT’s Principal Research Scientist, Andy McAfee, believes that “we haven’t seen anything yet” and that the impact of digital technology will be transformational.

UniCredit responded through a decisive strategy
What actions did UniCredit take to address these issues? In 2010, it shifted its focus to its core business, commercial banking, and thus anticipated a trend gradually spreading across the industry. It has realised its strategy through a set of concerted measures:

  • strategically aligned operations by newly defined customer segments and reinforced regional management around one profit & loss per country;
  • Strengthened relationships with family and business customers and introduced an integrated service model across a wide range of channels
  • Simplified its organisation to drive operational efficiency and faster decisions and enhanced its governance to better respond to regulatory changes.

UniCredit has performed remarkably well in this troubled macroeconomic setting. Today, it is a rock-solid commercial bank with a European network across 17 countries, over 8,900 branches and more than 147,000 employees. In 2013, it posted an operating income of €23,973 million and disposed of a number of legacies such as loan loss provisions, allowing it to focus on increasing its business and profitability. Please click to read more.

Business School Libraries – Where Next?

GF14 3 librariesDaniel Gunnarsson (Jönköping University Library, Sweden) describes the major changes that technology has made possible in business school libraries. And speculates about other changes that are still to come.

As far as I am aware there has not been much discussion about business school libraries in the Global Focus magazine. This is rather remarkable since technological change has had a major impact on library resources and services.

This change has significantly influenced how business schools researchers manage their access to scholarly publications and has also had an impact on how teachers select reading materials for their students. This article hopes to share some of the major changes in business school libraries that have already been implemented and also provide my views on what the future might bring. It will focus on four different themes: collections; technology; services; and the librarian.

Collections – from printed books to e-resources: For many people the library is still a place filled with printed books. That is in fact still true though it is not the whole truth. Behind the shelves of printed books there is a world filled with e-books available from the cloud. E-books create lots of advantages for the library and readers – simultaneous usage, no shelving, no weeding, deep searching within the whole text of the book, and 24/7 availability from all over the world– and no need to carry them around.
So, is the printed book on the road to extinction? If you ask me, no, not yet. Here are some reasons why not:

  • The most popular textbooks still have a business model that makes it impossible for business school libraries to promote access (some of the most used are not even available as e-books).
  • Students and researchers still prefer a printed source for longer reading (at least in my experience).
  • Among many people the printed book is still the most familiar source of academic information and it is hard to change that perception.
  • Finally, a printed book is very easy to browse and skip between different pages when you are reading.

GF14 3 JIBS logoHowever, in the future I expect the e-book to grow even more in importance over the printed book. Especially, books with a more focused content such as handbooks, anthologies and encyclopaedias are excellent as e-books since one only reads parts of them. In addition, books for complementary or supplementary reading will be sought out as e-books.

However, many questions will have to be solved regarding textbooks before a breakthrough can occur. Probably this will be managed outside the library, directly between the student and the publisher. As a concluding remark theshift from printed books to e-books has not, and will not, be as dramatic as the earlier change from printed journals to e-journals.Regarding the development of collections (whatever the format), this is a delicate relationship between me (a subject librarian) and students and staff (in this case at Jönköping International Business School in Sweden – JIBS). Please click to read more.

Reinvigorating the PhD

GF14 3 doctorPhDs are increasingly under scrutiny for being ‘irrelevant’ and ‘lacking impact’. But given the right tools, Simon Linacre at Emerald Group Publishing believes that they still have much to offer.

It may surprise some to know that the PhD, as it is today, only goes back to the 19th Century. As a result of education reforms in Germany it was established by Humboldt University, Berlin. Similarly, the vision of higher education offered by the undergraduate, master and PhD levels was only developed in the US in the late 1800s.This information was provided by Wikipedia and as such is not necessarily reviewed and corroborated for authenticity. It does however; provide an apt way to start a discussion on the status of the modern PhD. And more importantly, how it might develop in the digital age. Some think the PhD’s days are numbered, but I believe that there are one or two initiatives that may prove the doubters wrong.

Academy awards
One such initiative is the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards, research  jointly supported by the European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) and global publisher, Emerald Group Publishing. The awards – commonly known as the “ODRAs” – were conceived in the early 2000s as a way for EFMD and Emerald to recognise and promote emerging, high-quality PhD theses. Recent PhD graduates may submit a summary document of fewer than 2,000 words succinctly describing their PhD research. In order to bring out the more impactful elements of the research, submissions should highlight the following elements:

  • Significance/implications for theory and practice
  • Originality and innovation
  • Appropriateness and application of methodology
  • Data and findings

emerald logoThe submissions are judged by Emerald editors from its sponsoring journals in the business and management research portfolio.  Winners in each category are awarded a cash prize of €1,500, along with a certificate and winner’s logo.

Winners are also encouraged to follow up their success by writing up their research and submitting it to the appropriate sponsoring journal subject to normal peer review protocols.

Celebrating success
In the early days of the awards, there was some variance in the interest they provoked in researchers, mainly depending on the category. However, in recent years they have enjoyed significant success. The most recent awards in 2013 attracted 525 submissions from 78 different countries – an increase of more than 100 on the total submissions the year before allied to a much greater international coverage.

This supports the hypothesis that not only is the reach of organisations such as EFMD growing but also that much of the vibrant new research that has demonstrable impact is happening outside the established bastions of management education in Europe and North America.

What is notable about the submissions over the years is what they have signified for the development of postgraduate researchers’ careers. Emerald is, of course, only able to access its own data and the figures across all publishers will probably be even more impressive. But of the 980 ODRA submissions in 2010-2012, their authors went on to publish 437 articles in Emerald’s journals, 70 book chapters and
62 case studies. Please click to read more.

Solving the Global Talent Equation

GF14 3 JohnsonMike Johnson offers some thoughts on the challenges facing business leaders tasked with managing our organisations today and tomorrow.

Peter Lorange is angry. This well-seasoned academic, innovator and business leader thinks that it is high time a lot of his contemporaries woke up to the fact that the organisation has changed irretrievably – and do something about it!

Lorange’s concern is that too many organisations are not moving fast enough to keep up with the changes taking place in global society – most often driven by the digital explosion. “If we are going to be effective we must be able to really understand the modern consumer and come up with innovations that they value,” he says. “This is not easy.” Lorange isn’t the only one who observes that we need to get a whole lot at this.

Global people provider Manpower Inc. say that we are at the dawn of what they term “The Human Age”.  In Moving People to Work. Leveraging Talent Mobility to Address the Talent Mismatch in the Human Age, Manpower think that “in the Human Age, companies must align their talent strategies with their business strategies to ensure they have the right people in place to grow and succeed.” However, getting that right isn’t going to be easy either.

So far, many organisational observers think that we have failed to do very much. Rudi Plettinx, Managing Director of Management Centre Europe in Brussels, notes that “although we’ve had all the processes in place time after time, in truth our developmental programmes have failed.” He adds: “HR has never, ever become a real partner of the executive team – although there are a few exceptions. As long as senior executives have been paying lip service and see these vital initiatives as just another HR process rather than a strategic leadership strategy process, I‘m afraid that effective talent management won’t really be on the radar screens of our C-Suite managers.” Plettinx speaks for many frustrated leadership experts when he continues: “HR failed to make this a strategic business issue with top management and so it has festered in the inner circles of an organisation’s HR community. Talent is not just about having the appropriate recruitment and retention strategy, it is also about an effective development strategy.

GF14 3 johnson bookThe arrival of ‘talentism’
Manpower’s idea of a Human Age demands that the collective group of stakeholders collaborate to find new, innovative ways to operate in a world where people with the right skills are the scarce resource and “talentism” is supplanting capitalism.

It may be a lot to swallow in one go, talentism taking over from capitalism, but Manpower haven’t finished yet. They further their case by noting that, “when a third of employers globally cannot fill positions, it’s imperative that stakeholders expand their view of talent sources and incorporate strategies for attracting individuals with needed skills from across international borders”. Please click to read more.

This article is an edited extract from The WorldWide WorkPlace: Solving the Global Talent Equation by Mike Johnson, published by Palgrave 2014.

New in 2015: PMI Teaching Case Competition

PMI LogoPMI Academic Resources invites project management scholars and practitioners to participate in its inaugural teaching case competition, launching 2 January 2015.

Teaching with cases helps to create an energising atmosphere that inspires students to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. The challenge for faculty has been to find high-quality teaching cases in project management. This competition aspires to build a repository of high-quality teaching cases available for faculty to use in undergraduate and postgraduate project management programs.

The theme of this year’s competition is Project Management and Disaster Relief. The competition will be judged by a panel of expert case writers and project management scholars, with monetary prizes for the top three cases, as follows:

PMI case1st Prize: US$3,000
2nd Prize: US$2,000
3rd Prize: US$1,000

The top three finalists will be invited to PMI Global Congress 2015—North America, where the winners will be announced. The prize-winning cases will be published through PMI.

The early submission deadline is 1 April 2015.  Please click  for complete guidelines and submission details. You are also invited to check the FAQs or contact PMI for This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

You may also be interested in recent research from the Project Management Institute:

And there is more from the PMI Publications website.

The Challenges Facing Business School Accreditation

GF14 3 osbaldeston2Business schools have been among the most successful higher education institutions of the last 50 years. Yet now they face many serious challenges that, as Michael Osbaldeston explains, have deep implications for accreditation bodies.

Business schools have existed for over a century, originally as institutions of practical education, which, following the Ford and Carnegie Foundation reports of the 1950s, were gradually recast as serious academic institutions. More recently, they have spread rapidly from North America, through Europe to Asia and beyond, currently numbering over 13,000, with new additions being launched almost daily, particularly in emerging economies.

Business schools are one of the major success stories in higher education of the last 50 years, both from an academic (faculty, research, qualifications) and a business (customers, revenue, profitability) perspective.Yet despite this success, critical comment has been growing in recent years, fuelled in part by the recent global economic recession.

These criticisms have been concisely summarised by Thomas et al in their 2014 EFMD publication Securing the Future of Management Education: “Critics accuse business schools of doing arcane, irrelevant and impractical academic research; doing a poor job of preparing students for management careers; pandering to the market and the media rankings; failing to ask important questions; and in the process of responding to the demands of their environment, losing claims of professionalization as they ‘dumb down’ the content of courses,
inflate grades to keep students happy and pursue curricula fads”.

If that were not sufficient, others have added charges of being too analytical, insular and theoretical; insufficiently global, integrative and team-oriented; and lacking in values and ethical guidance. It is hardly surprising then that some leading schools have turned to accreditation to demonstrate their worth and provide quality assurance to their stakeholders.

equis2013The accreditation of management education was initiated by AACSB as far back as 1916, with a focus on North America. AMBA, set up initially as an alumni network, originally concentrated on MBA programmes with a primary focus on the UK. It was not until 1997 that the demand for a European approach to accreditation led EFMD to launch EQUIS, with an initial focus on European schools, and later EPAS, its programme accreditation system.

All three accreditation organisations have expanded internationally, to the point where some 1,000 schools today have achieved one or more of their accreditations. EQUIS aims to achieve both recognition of and quality improvement in the world’s top business schools – recognition through the award of a quality label that is valued worldwide by students, faculty, employers and the media (often being a prerequisite for entry to rankings) and improvement through the need to meet, and continue to achieve, internationally agreed quality standards.

From the beginning EQUIS was … please click to continue reading this article from the latest EFMD Global Focus magazine.

Embedding Values in Multicultural Business Organisations

GF14 3MoodyStuartartMark Moody-Stuart examines the difficulties of ensuring that the right values are agreed, understood and truly embedded in a large multicultural business organisation.

I once attended a large dinner and discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on standards for not-for-profit organisations. The debate was mainly between the leaders of such organisations asking themselves how they could ensure a common commitment to standards so that a failure in one sphere by one organisation did not tarnish the reputation of the sector as a whole. One leader of a large not-for-profit said that he was concerned how he could ensure that every one of his 60,000 employees in many different countries were all living up to the values of the organisation. It is a very valid concern and with some satisfaction I was able to welcome him to the ranks of multinational business and its many challenges.

The test of embedding values in large global organisations comes in several parts: first, establishing and agreeing common values; then making sure that everyone has really taken them on board; and lastly continuously checking that they are alive and well throughout the organisation.

A crisis is often a stimulus for creating or reviewing values. Shell had a well-established and well-embedded “Statement of General Business Principles” developed in the 1970s in response to a corruption scandal in Italy. In my experience, in the 1990s, if you asked anyone in Shell what the group’s business principles were they would say: “We don’t bribe people and we do not get involved in politics”.They could say “we” with some confidence because there had been regular discussions on the challenges of working in corrupt environments and people knew of examples of business lost due to a refusal to pay bribes. The policy of not making political payments was also well known.

GF14 3MoodyStuartcoverHowever, in 1995 two events involving respectively the environment and human rights caused public outrage and shook confidence and self-esteem throughout the organisation. These events were the reaction triggered by Greenpeace against plans to dispose of a very large oil storage buoy in the deep waters of the Atlantic and the execution in Nigeria of Ken Saro Wiwa, an outspoken critic of Shell’s activities.In both cases we thought that we had taken all steps in line with our principles but many people were very critical of our actions – or inactions. While we had told “war stories” about corruption, we had previously never spoken explicitly about human rights.

In response to this public concern Shell undertook a global consultation process. Workshops brought people at all levels in the company together with representatives of civil society organisations, the media, academics and political thinkers. Out of this came three amendments to the existing principles … please click to read more.

Special Offer for EFMD members: get 20% off  “Responsible Leaders” by ordering from Greenleaf Publishing using code EFMD20.

The New EFMD Global Focus Magazine 2014 is now Available

Global Focus-Issue3 2014

This latest issue of Global Focus begins with an article by EFMD's Michael Osbaldeston on how accreditation can, and is, helping business schools respond to many of the challenges and criticisms facing the sector.

You can read or download the full issue for free via the EFMD Library on Issuu or access the tablet versions via iTunes and Google Play.

In focus and Contents

Business School Impact Survey

The EFMD Excellence in Practice Awards (EIP): Call for Entries

EFMD/EURAM Research Leadership Programme, Cycle 5

The challenges facing business school accreditation: Business schools have been among the most successful higher education institutions of the last 50 years. Yet now they face many serious challenges that, as Michael Osbaldeston explains, have deep implications for accreditation bodies.

EFMD & Graduway partnering to raise standards in alumni relations

Embedding values: Mark Moody-Stuart examines the difficulties of ensuring that the right values are agreed, understood and truly embedded in a large multicultural business organisation.

The Jazz Age: Social intrapreneurs are rarely individual heroes but more like jazz musicians jamming in a group. But sometimes, say David Grayson, Melody McLaren and Heiko Spitzeck, they need even bigger groups – a fully orchestrated ‘big band’.

Smart Diploma

Enhancing talent development and talent acquisition: Amber Wigmore Alvarez and Boris Nowalski describe current changes to the way companies and business schools manage talent.

How being embedded in your region helps growth: Thomas Bieger explains how the University of St Gallen used the new Business School Impact Survey to consolidate and build on its local roots.

From EPAS to EQUIS and AACSB…and from AACSB to EPAS: Anne-Joëlle Philippart explains how the mix of EFMD and AACSB accreditation models helped achieve a rapid improvement of the quality assurance system at HEC-Liege.

Adjunct Finder.com: connecting part-time faculty and business schools.

The case for inspiration: Donald Marchand and Anna Moncef discuss the lessons to be learned from the Novartis SMS for Life initiative.

Making the most of the hiring process: The latest Corporate Recruiters Survey offers a positive MBA hiring landscape and highlights what is most important for employers in the process. Christophe Lejeune and Michelle Sparkman Renz report.

Solving the global talent equation: Mike Johnson offers some thoughts on the challenges facing business leaders tasked with managing our organisations today and tomorrow.

Reinvigorating the PhD: PhDs are increasingly under scrutiny for being ‘irrelevant’ and ‘lacking impact’. But given the right tools, Simon Linacre believes that they still have much to offer.

The new approach to growth and profitability that business schools need: Peter Lorange and Jimmi Rembiszewski argue that business schools must react more urgently to a new type of student.

Business school libraries – where next? Daniel Gunnarsson describes the major changes that technology has made possible in business school libraries. And speculates about other changes that are still to come.

Strategic leadership and new ways of working to drive organizational growth – the UniCredit approach: Andrew Rutsch explains how Italian banking group UniCredit turned to strategic leadership and new ways of working in a bid to drive organisational growth.

EFMD Upcoming Events

2015 EFMD Conference for International and External Relations, PR, Marketing, Communication and Alumni Professionals

Looking for more students? Recruit with Precision with the Graduate Management Admission Search Service

If you have any comments or questions on Global Focus or would like to propose story ideas please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IESE & Barcelona is the New Location for the GBSN & EFMD Africa Conference

Africa Banner web2

NEW LOCATION: The 2014 Africa Conference has been moved from Ghana to IESE & Barcelona.

It is with great disappointment that EFMD, GBSN & GIMPA have to announce that the 2014 Africa Conference has been moved from Ghana to Barcelona, Spain due to the ongoing and tragic crisis surrounding the Ebola virus.

The President of Ghana issued a 3-month moratorium on international conferences and there are rising concerns among our member schools about the Ebola crisis, so the decision to move location had to be made.

Since the new venue for the conference will be Barcelona, Spain, we hope that our members that were not planning to travel to Ghana, but still have an interest in business education in Africa see this as an opportunity to participate in engaging discussions with a very international audience.  The conference program will keep a strong focus on Africa.

We warmly thank IESE Business School for stepping in to offer their facilities at such short notice and being so supportive of the network.

The conference will take place on the initially planned dates of 4th-5th November 2014, with the GBSN Members Meeting and EFMD Accreditation seminar on 3rd November 2014. Even though the conference location will change, the conference program will keep a strong focus on Africa with the same agenda and we look forward to engaging discussions with a very international audience.

Early Bird Registration has been extended through September 30th, and new hotel information will be posted to the website soon. Please check back to www.gbsn.org/africa2014 for more information.

We would like to thank all of our members for your understanding and continued support and look forward to warmly welcoming you to Spain. If you have any questions please contact  Page Buchanan, GBSN, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Griet Houbrechts, EFMD, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

The Third Wave: The Future of Leadership Development

pivot logoToday’s world requires leaders who have more authenticity, better agility and a stronger sense of agency. This brilliant white paper provides a framework on how to prepare leaders for what is needed in this new world.

Authors Sullivan, Philpot and Meeks underline that the "Third Wave" approach means stepping out of your comfort zone, but their experience indicates that rewards tend to match the risks. Pivot Leadership is a strategic leadership boutique that partners with Fortune 500 executives to help them lead, innovate, and adapt to volatile markets and changing industries.

This white paper focuses on redefining leadership development around five key dimensions:

  • Ideology: Bringing the hard and soft sciences together, future leaders must be able to integrate both the hard and soft aspects of leadership.
  • Focus: From personality to purpose, in the sense of the strongly felt responsibility that a leader has for taking action even in the face of risk, conflict and uncertainty.
  • Participants: From clean fish to clean tanks, in terms of cultivating the system within which leadership is exercised: learning becomes embedded, operationalised and intertwined with change.
  • Technique: From application to immersion in the sense of extensive and intense exposure of leaders to the natural settings in which leadership is actually excercised.
  • Outcome: The three A’s: Agency, Authenticity and Agility, which means going beyond knowledge, skills and competencies.

Pivot coverImplications for Practice

Pivot Leadership experts focus on five critical design principles, each derived from the dimensions described above:

Ideology: Putting disruption in the foreground: By addressing competitive threats, changing customer needs, and how the business must reinvent itself, leaders will develop an integrated perspective on their business.

Focus: Discovering purpose: Leadership development should address a person’s intellectual and emotional capacity in an integrated way.

Participants: Bringing the ecosystem into the room: The best method for teaching “enterprise thinking” is to include customers, partners, and key stakeholders as part of the live learning experience.

Technique: Using immersion to stimulate visceral learning: The real work of a leadership development is to help participants figure out things for themselves.

Outcome: Developing agency, authenticity and agility: The output of leadership development should be about changing mindsets, the quality of dialogue leaders have, their sense of responsibility and their sense of purpose.

If you are interested in more details, this 15-page white paper can be downloaded for free from the Pivot Leadership website that has more information on other publications and their expertise.

Perhaps you are also interested in the EFMD Excellence in Practice "EiP" Awards. EIP recognise outstanding and impactful Learning & Development (L&D) partnerships in the domains of Leadership, Professional, Talent and Organisation Development. The L&D initiative described in the case can be deployed by an organisation either together with its in-house Learning & Development unit or with external L&D providers, such as a business school or executive education center. This Special Supplement of Global Focus features the winners and highly commended entries of the 2013 EFMD Excellence in Practice Awards and covers Group Danone & London Business School, ATOS & HEC Paris, Danske Bank Sweden & Stockholm School of Econimics, IFL, EDF & Toulouse School of Econimics and Galician Automotive Cluster & CEAGA's corporate university.

Scientific Advances in Developing Leaders for Today's Complex Environment

ashridgeYou are kindly invited to CRED3, the 3rd Ashridge Centre for Research in Executive Development Conference, that will take place at Ashridge in the UK on 11-13 December 2014.  The conference will bring together academics and practitioners to explore how research from the behavioural sciences can inform our understanding of the process and experience of learning, with the aim of improving the effectiveness of executive development in developing leaders who can prosper in today's complex environment.

This conference will address one of the developing needs and key priorities in the changing world of executive development. The business environment is growing ever more complex, and the demands placed on executives to deal with this complexity are growing in equal measure. This conference will explore how research in the behavioural sciences can inform our understanding of the process and experience of learning, to help improve the effectiveness of executive education in developing leaders who can prosper in today’s complex environment.

To this end, conceptual, empirical or practice based submissions are welcome on any of the following topics, or any others relevant to the theme of the conference:

  • Exploring the cognition behind learning to improve the way we teach
  • The neurological underpinnings and social processes of executive education
  • Exploiting the neuroplasticity of our brains to enhance our capacity to learn
  • Engaging motivation for reward to improve the effectiveness of learning
  • Applying an understanding of the biology of consumer behaviour to the classroom
  • Moving beyond competence development
  • Methods and processes to accelerate vertical development
  • The social psychology of the classroom experience
  • The impact of personality on learning and interaction in the classroom
  • Understanding the psychobiology and neurology of learning
  • Incorporating experiential learning into programmes and workplace learning
  • The collaborative nature of leadership and implications for development
  • Lessons business schools can learn from our complex and turbulent environment

Papers should include recommendations for implementation in practice. The deadline for the submission of full papers is 10th October 2014.  Please go here to download the full Call for Papers in pdf format - as well as latest news on keynote speakers.

The conference will interest HR and L&D practitioners, business school faculty and those involved in the design and delivery of executive education, as well as academics undertaking research in the application of the behavioural sciences to the development of leaders.  Please do consult the Ashridge website for full details.

EFMD Awards EQUIS Accreditation to AUC, KEDGE and Frankfurt

EQUIS-accreditation2014

EFMD would like to warmly congratulate AUC, KEDGE and Frankfurt who have just been awarded EQUIS accreditation.

who have just been awarded EQUIS accreditation.This takes the number of accredited schools to 147 across 40 countries.

  • “Internationally mobile students as well as companies who work with business schools to develop their most promising talent all have an interest in whether a business school is accredited, and if so, by whom,” explained Professor Dr. Udo Steffens, President of Frankfurt School. “This is where EQUIS plays an absolutely vital role, by helping us to attract top talent from all over the world to study at our business school. This both strengthens us and raises Frankfurt’s profile as a leading business centre.”

  • "The creation of KEDGE BS was challenging for all staff and the support and understanding of the EFMD was essential to our progress. As the EQUIS criteria underpins our vision of an international school, it is particularly motivating to have achieved accreditation following our merger. The input from EQUIS was a caring balance of praise and focused criticism that will guide and motivate us for the future. We want to offer the best in personal and professional development and EQUIS helps us to do so," said Dr. Philip McLaughlin, Acting Dean and Director, KEDGE Business School.
  • “AUC School of Business has been working relentlessly and passionately over the last five years with its different stakeholders to create a culture of change and continuous improvement and to transform assessment and accreditation from being a destination to being the ongoing driver for bettering our program and service offerings to cater to the needs of the society.  It is invaluably inspiring to see the school, over such a short time despite the developments taking place in Egypt, become EQUIS accredited consequently triple-crowned and making it in a better position to serve its community,” said Dr. Sherif Kamel, Dean, School of Business, The American University in Cairo
  • “EQUIS accreditation is the ultimate acknowledgement of Frankfurt School’s successful development over the last few years – I am absolutely delighted by this achievement!” confirmed Professor Dr. h.c. Klaus-Peter Müller, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management Foundation and Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Commerzbank AG. “EQUIS accreditation helps to underline the fact that our key strategic projects, such as the development of our research capabilities and international expansion, are all heading in the right direction.”

Prof. Michael Osbaldeston, the EFMD Director of Quality Services added, "We are delighted to warmly welcome the three new schools into the EQUIS community. Accreditation from EFMD is one of the best and most complete ways to certify the quality of a business school as acreditation involves an extensive self-assessment by the School, a visit of an international review team who spend several days interviewing many different people in the School, and finally a very experienced jury evaluating the assessment and findings of the review team to determine whether the School should be granted accreditation. There are currently no substitutes for such an in-depth assessment of quality and both schools should be commended for their commitment to excellence."

The benefits of accreditation include:

  • Information for the global education market on the basis of substance
  • International recognition of excellence: international development
  • Mechanism for international benchmarking with the best
  • Sharing of good practice and mutual learning
  • Agenda for quality improvement and future development
  • Acceleration of quality improvement in international management education
  • Legitimacy to internal and external stakeholders that you have a strong international reputation (donors, alumni, government) and that your school meets the high standards of the best business schools in the world
  • Become part of a network of top schools to develop relationships with fellow EFMD accredited schools for research, exchanging best practices on programmes, etc.
  • International Legitimacy vis-a-vis - recruiting international students; creating double degree partnerships; forming international exchange relationships; recruiting executive development custom programme clients; recruiting new faculty

More information on EQUIS is available at www.efmd.org/equis

Announcing the 2014 EFMD Excellence in Practice Gold Award Winners

EIP Gold Award 2014

EFMD is delighted to announce the 2014 Excellence in Practice Gold Award Winners.


"The applications to this year's EIP Awards were again of a very high level and exemplified the growing demand to show the impact of Learning & Development initiatives. Every single finalist represents an excellent investment case, based on solid partnerships." said Dr. Richard Straub, Director of Corporate Services at EFMD.

EFMD wants to provide visibility and support to all professionals in the L&D sector. The Gold cases will be showcased during the next EFMD Executive Development Conference which will be hosted by St. Gallen University on 1-3 October. 

The 2014 Gold Award Winners include:

Category: Talent Development
FrieslandCampina & Ashridge Business School
“Developing Talent for 2020”

Category: Executive Development
Promsvyazbank (PSB) & Chicago Booth School of Business
“PSB & Chicago Booth NewEXperienceTime”

Category: Organisational Development
Stora Enso & IMD
“Stora Enso & IMD – A Pathbreaking Partnership”

Category: Professional Development
University Medical Center Groningen & Amsterdam Business School
“An Industry Approach Transforms Healthcare: A 7 Year Journey”

We would like to thank all of the applicants as well as the jury members for their successful cooperation and hope to receive more exciting cases next year. The continuously growing quality of applications has led to the decision to give visibility to more cases as of this year. As well as the Gold Award winners there were Silver Award winners and also Finalists selected from all of the entries.

More information on the full result can be found via 2014 EFMD Excellence in Practice Award Winners.

Quotes from the Winners

  • “The Amsterdam Business School and University Medical Center Groningen are very proud that they have won the prestigious EFMD best case award in the category professional development. It is a recognition of the dedication and focus of everyone involved in this project and we hope it will provide best practice and inspiration for other organizations to effectively implement operational excellence.”
    Prof.dr. Ronald J.M.M. Does, Amsterdam Business School, University of Amsterdam

  • "To receive this award is immensely encouraging for FrieslandCampina. Since we stated our ambition to be the most successful, professional and attractive dairy company we have worked really hard to unleash talent in the company and make talent management an integral part of our business strategy. The programme we have created with Ashridge is really helping our key talents to be our leaders for the future. The leadership mindset created in the programme is working well, and we are currently bringing it alive in the whole company. We still have many great challenges ahead to realise our ambition, so we are grateful for the extra energy this award gives us."
    Willem der Lee, Corporate Director of Talent, FrieslandCampina

  • "We are immensely proud to be working with FrieslandCampina on such a powerful programme of personal and organisational development, and for the quality of this work to have been recognised. This is a testament to our strong and trusting partnership. It also shows that - with clarity, focus and imagination - an incredible amount of change can be achieved over a very short timeframe. We are absolutely thrilled with this achievement and that the FrieslandCampina programme has won a highly coveted EFMD Excellence in Practice award.”
    Lindsey Masson, Executive Director, Corporate Business, Ashridge Business School

  • “Speaking for all the Booth faculty that participated in the NEXT PSB program, we are delighted to win the EFMD gold medal award. The success of the program, and the resulting award is confirmation of the formula for success in customized leadership programs: high quality faculty, a dedicated executive education staff, and a customer who is highly engaged and committed to creating the context necessary for successful leadership development in their organization."
    Marc Knez, Faculty Director, Chicago Booth School of Business

  • "We are happy and proud that EFMD has recognized our NEXT program with such a high award among other well-known international companies. Recognition of our project as one of the best is confirmation that together with our partner Chicago Booth School of Business we have managed to find creative, and most importantly, effective solutions to our challenges. The program became a powerful tool for further business development and strategic goals achievement, and this award inspires our Corporate University to continue forming a new leadership culture and contribute to the development of the next generation of PSB leaders."
    Oxana Martynova, Head of Corporate University, Promsvyazbank

  • “It was our distinct privilege to work with the inquisitive and passionate PSB leaders. Without doubt they made the learning journey at Chicago Booth an insightful, refreshing and impactful experience. Their willingness to think critically and collaboratively about their shared leadership challenges and to engage with our faculty in a robust dialogue is the foundation of a very open and fruitful collaboration with PSB. We are grateful and proud to have been granted this special award. We trust that this recognition will help maintain the desire and ambition to learn and explore new ways to bring success to PSB.”
    Eugenia Patriniche, Programme Director, Chicago Booth School of Business

  • “It’s a great honor and confirmation of our work with Stora Enso to have received this award. The Pathbuilder journey shows the immense strategic impact that educational programs can have both on the individual but also the organization level.”
    Albrecht Enders, Professor of Strategy and Innovation, IMD

If you have any questions or would like further information on the EIP awards you can find out more via this EIP Overview Brief or please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EFMD Launch Business School Impact System (BSIS)

BSIS

At the 2014 EFMD Deans & Director General Conference in Gothenburg hosted by the University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law, EFMD officially launched BSIS - Business School Impact Survey.

Prof Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General of EFMD said, "BSIS is a vital addition to the EFMD portfolio of services as it provides a process and tool to capture the value that a school brings to a defined region. It is a service for any business school anywhere in the world that is interested in collecting key statistical data on its impact. Once collected this information can then be used both internally and externally with key stakeholders to widen the debate about "the role of business schools in society" and showcase the enormous added value and impact they bring to a community."

The BSIS scheme identifies the tangible and intangible benefits that a business school brings to its local environment. For example, a school spends money in its impact zone; it provides jobs and pays salaries that are partially spent in the zone; and it attracts faculty and students from outside the zone whose expenditures contribute to the local economy. Beyond this measurable financial impact, a school contributes to the life of the community in numerous ways. Its faculty generate new business creation through entrepreneurial projects and support local business needs through professional training. Its students are a source of dynamism in the life of the region and are a valuable talent resource when they graduate. A business school also provides an important intellectual forum for the introduction of new ideas in a wide variety of social, cultural and political areas of concern within a region. Last but not least, it contributes to the image of the city or region.

"Demonstrating the many ways in which they add economic and social value to the environment in which they operate has become a challenge for business schools. To meet this demand for greater accountability, BSIS is an effective tool to help schools identify, measure and communicate all the positive contributions they make to the world around them," added Prof. Gordon Shenton, Senior Advisor, EFMD.

At a time when all organisations, public or private, are being held accountable for their activities, there is a need to demonstrate the impact that they are having on their immediate environment. This is particularly the case when they are financed or politically supported by local stakeholders.

"From my experience of BSIS in seven French Business Schools (La Rochelle Business School, IAE Lyon, Groupe ESC Troyes, Audencia, IAE Grenoble, EM Normandie and Toulouse Business School) the first benefit of BSIS was unexpected, as the process significantly raised the awareness within the school of the importance of its impact on the Region. The second major benefit from going through the BSIS review was it substantially improved communication with all of the key stakeholders of the Business Schools," said Michel Kalika, Senior Advisor, EFMD.

The BSIS scheme was initially designed by FNEGE (the French National Foundation for Management Education) and is already well established in the French higher education arena. The BSIS process has been adapted for an international audience and is now offered in a joint venture between EFMD and FNEGE as a service to EFMD members in any part of the world.

If you would like further information or are interested in your school taking part you can visit www.efmd.org/bsis or please contact: Gordon SHENTON: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Michel KALIKA: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

To MOOC or Not To MOOC, That is the Question

johanroosGuest Post from Johan Roos, Dean, Jönköping International Business School, Sweden

The MOOCs phenomenon – Massive Open Online Courses – comes with either the threat or promise of disruptive innovation in one of the fundamental pillars of society: higher education. How should business schools deal with this phenomenon?

 MOOCs are networked higher education courses delivered on the net to anyone with a thick internet connection, anywhere. The first MOOC was offered in 2008 – and was a result of the convergence of distance (“e-“) learning and the accelerating bandwidth of the internet. The acronym speaks to the promises that MOOCs offer:

  • cable worldMassive. The technology enables thousands of students to enroll and participate at any time in courses about anything taught by talented professors from any institution in the world.
  • Open.  They are open in several respects. Anyone can enroll. Students may pay a symbolic fee to get the formal credit from the host institution, but they do not pay for participation in the course.  The material produced by faculty is open and shared openly.
  • Online. Participants network openly with faculty, among themselves, and with others who are online. Content is always available on the net and can take many forms, like articles, books, videos, tweets and tags.
  • Courses.  MOOCs can cover just about any course taught in a traditional university setting, from humanities to social sciences, to even the hard sciences. Almost no type of course is MOOC ineligible.

The arguments between MOOCs proponents and skeptics are filling newspaper articles, blog posts, tweets and conferences. Will MOOCs fundamentally transform higher education, or is it just hype playing on the emotional appeal of “bringing inexpensive higher education to millions?” No matter what it is, it seems clear that university leaders need to start paying greater attention.

Learnings from Two Conferences: Over the last weeks, I attended two meetings for business school leaders where the MOOCs theme surfaced center stage: the 2014 EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General in Gothenburg and the 2014 AACSB Deans Conference in San Francisco. These meetings attracted respectively more than 300 and 600 business school leaders from all over the world. During the sessions, I learned about the leading providers of MOOCs:

  1. A few Stanford science and engineering professors began offering their courses online and founded the for-profit MOOCs providers Udacity and Coursera.
  2.  The MOOCs landscape today includes a range of for- and non-profit providers with their own twist, including KhanAcademy, Udemy, and CodeAcademy.
  3. MIT and Harvard formed a new approach, the edX consortium, which currently includes many Ivy League quality universities in the world. In July 2013, edX went open-source and shared the software needed to develop MOOCs.
  4. In September 2013, Google signed up with edX to create a portal website that will go live in a few months  mooc.org – which they hope will soon become a YouTube for MOOCs. (Google is already a member of the Udacity initiated Open Education Alliance.)

Understanding the debate: At the two gatherings, we heard from both MOOCs proponents and skeptics. Simon Nelson, CEO of FutureLearn (“Learn anytime, anywhere”), gave a sobering view of the possibilities of MOOCs, reminding us they are a merely an extension of the Open University approach already in place for 40 years. His message: Forget the hype about the end of universities. Higher ed just needs to learn how to augment their content with crowd interaction and great online user-experiences. Some claimed MOOCs have already gone from good to great. Paul Stacey of Creative Common praised one of the first MOOCs, ds106.us for its fundamental social learning, open pedagogy and underlying “constructivism” philosophy of education. His message: don’t let these fundamentals slip.

MOOCdrawingCoursera co-founder Daphny Koller (“Take the World’s Best Courses, On-Line, for Free”) and Ben Nelson, founder of Minerva (“Only the world’s brightest, most motivated students will be invited to attend”) represented the contrast between Massively & Open-oriented vs. Small & Elite-oriented.  Their overall message was that MOOCs will help teaching reclaim prominence in today’s research-biased higher education world.

From the debate, Q&As, and informal talk during these gatherings, it became clear to me that in MOOCs lie both opportunities and threats for all higher education institutions, including business schools. Some will find natural strengths to integrate MOOCs into their strategy, like the renowned universities that have already signed up with big MOOC providers. But others will have faculty members who adamantly oppose MOOCs, and some institutions will assert their territorialism.

We are seeing this already. On 2 May 2013, professors in the philosophy department at San Jose State University, CA wrote a letter to Michael Sandel, a Harvard professor whose MOOC on Justice they felt infringed on their own curriculum. The letter urged Sandel to “not produce products that will replace professors, dismantle departments, and provide a diminished education for students in public universities.” But one of the commentaries on this letter countermanded, “…we also need to face the fact that professors can be expendable and replaceable, especially when real financial constraints are considered.  That is tough on egos.” Similarly, 58 Harvard professors voiced their frustration that Harvard had become so deeply involved with edX without consulting them. In a letter to the dean they called for a new committee and greater oversight of MOOCs. The dean didn’t comply.

diplomaSo What’s Next? Personally, I see potential for symbiosis from the interaction of traditional higher education and MOOCs. On one hand, even the skeptics can’t ignore the gross enrolment numbers MOOCs can generate. In January 2014, one of the earliest MOOC providers signed up students at a daily rate of 10.000, totaling some 7 million participants. Skeptics point to low completion rates though, only 4 to 10%. But, even with completion rate of just 7%, the number of Coursera “graduates” equals all students currently enrolled in three Harvard Universities and one MIT combined. Such an achievement calls for celebration, IMO!

I also agree with the criticisms about traditional lectures and often ask faculty why any student should spend time listening to one in an auditorium. Students tell me they rather get an App or go to an online site where they can watch a video of the lecture whenever and wherever they like. They also want to be able to choose the video of a more talented professor—and we are seeing this happen– celebrity professors who are becoming like rockstars.

But questions remain: Will students and employers value a MOOC diploma as much as the one from a “real” university? What is the perceived value of an “accreditation” of a course made by a Nobel Laureate compared to an international accreditation agency? A few days ago 110.000 people had signed up for the first such MOOC, offered by Laureate Robert Schiller,  who gained the prize in 2013. Can MOOC providers continue to operate with a viable business model? And who will pay for the professorial time devoted to develop and run MOOCs, especially in institutions already stretched financially?

What will evolve next is an open question for all of us. If MOOCs represent the tsunami some people claim they are, it is difficult to see how resistance to them will prevail. The next step would at least be for universities to open up to substituting MOOCs for some their own courses in programs delivered on campus. I am sure the MOOCs providers are exploring viable business models that could let this happen, and quality ensured licensing looks like the natural choice.

jonkoping logoIn my business school, JIBS, I want us to be ready for this possibility. That is why we recently launched a strategic project with a dual purpose: 1) to explore how we could encourage some faculty members to develop MOOCs and learn from this; and 2) how we can integrate others’ MOOCs into our degree programs. At least, we’re taking a first step.

GSE / EFMD Global Focus Collection Now Available in the SOL Library

solSpecialist publishers and partners of EFMD, Greenleaf Publishing and GSE Research have launched a new online collection of books and journals in sustainability, CSR, corporate governance, ethics, environmental policy and management, and related fields.

The collection also includes the GSE/EFMD Global Focus collection that contains over 100 papers focusing on sustainability, social responsibility, and business and executive education.

Containing almost 400 volumes, the Sustainable Organization Library (SOL) gives instant access to an international collection, for use in study, research and executive education. The books and journals in SOL have never previously been available as a collection, and many have never been available at all digitally.

The Sustainable Organization Library also includes subscriptions to Greenleaf’s Journal of Corporate Citizenship, and Business Peace and Sustainable Development journals, and draws on material from a number of international publishing partners. More information is available at www.greenleaf-publishing.com/sol

Greenleaf Director John Peters said: “There has never been a more pressing need to bring sustainability into business practice and management education. This can’t be seen as ‘nice to do’ any more – it’s must do.”

“Sustainability is one of the key issues for the 21st century – this is an exceptional collection that will be of great value to business schools, companies and NGO's all over the world,” said Prof. Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General, EFMD.

SOL is available to buy outright, or on an annual subscription, and is hosted on the well-established IngentaConnect platform. SOL operates under the simple and straightforward SERU (Shared e-Resource Understanding) licence created by NISO, the US National Standards Institute, with no digital rights management (DRM) restrictions. This makes SOL available to all members of an organization.

In the SOL collection, each chapter or paper– more than 5,000 – is tagged individually, so users can easily find individual items that are relevant to them.

Professor Simon Mercado, Associate Dean at Nottingham Business School commented: “This is a welcome innovation for all of us committed to responsible leadership values and sustainability-related research and education.”

Greenleaf Publishing was launched 21 years ago following the first Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and now has representation in the USA and India, as well as publishing offices in Leeds and Sheffield, UK. Greenleaf is an independent publisher, which works in partnership with many international organizations including EFMD and PRME, the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education.

To review our book titles, or if you are interested in writing for Greenleaf, go to our site www.greenleaf-publishing.com.

Free trials of the SOL collection are available to all EFMD members. To request a free trial, please forward this to your institution’s librarian. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Or contact Greenleaf Publishing, Aizlewood’s Mill, Nursery Street, Sheffield S3 8GG, UK; telephone +44 114 282 3475.

Counting Down to the 2014 EFMD Deans & Directors Conference

The 2014 EFMD Deans & Directors General Conference is fast approaching and will be hosted by the University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law in Sweden next week on the 30-31st Jan. ddm2014pic

This year’s conference will cover topics such as:

  • Integrating sustainability and what this means for business education;
  • Are business schools preparing graduates with competencies linked to sustainability?
  • The hot topic of MOOCs will be explored in detail;
  • The relationship between corporations and business schools: are they really working?
  • Reflections on business education in general: does business education have a need for more innovation, is it relevant;
  • Interdisciplinary programmes, how a school can best link disciplines to its advantage, etc.

This is a unique global meeting that allows Deans to exchange, discuss and share their own experiences with their peers from around the world.

The conference will be chaired by Christopher Earley, Dean, Krannert Graduate School of Management, Purdue University, US and speakers include:

  • Sustainability – Corporate Perspective - Tom Johnstone, President and CEO, SKF AB, SE

  • Panel Discussion on The Role of MOOCs
    Provider perspective: Simon Nelson, CEO, Futurelearn, UK
    Pedagogical perspective: Paul Stacey, Senior Project Manager, Creative Commons, USA

  • Swedish Corporate Perspective
    Olaf Persson, President and CEO, Volvo, SEAnd many more…

For the opening panel on Thursday 30 January, Adrian Wooldridge, Management Editor and 'Schumpeter' columnist from The Economist will reflect on the changing business education landscape, the role and purpose of business education and highlight some of his key concerns for the industry. The session and Q&A will be moderated by Johan Roos, Dean and Managing Director, Jönköping International Business School, SE.

2014ddm iTunes google play

The full programme is here and there is still time to register online. If you have any questions please contact Delphine HAUSPY This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Mounting Momentum of MOOCs - An Update on the Rapid Growth of MOOCs

mooc14-2This paper is a sequel to the White Paper: MOOCs Are on the Move, first published in January 2013. The purpose of this paper is to observe the growth and impact the concept of MOOCs have had over the past year as well as some key issues and emerging trends. This paper comes with a qualifier: the growth of MOOCs continues to be exponential and as soon as an article or paper is published about MOOCs it can often be out-of-date within a matter of weeks or even days.

What are MOOCs
Although awareness of the term MOOCs has grown significantly during the past year, there are now different forms and variations of MOOCs. The term MOOCs comes from the original concept of Massive Open Online Courses and which mainly applies to short courses offered by universities and higher education providers. MOOCs aggregators offer a range of free online courses covering an increasing number of topics delivered by qualified lecturers from some of the most well-known universities in the world. A key aspect of MOOCs is the access they provide to quality learning and development courses for virtually everyone, anytime, anywhere in the world with internet access.

Over the past year awareness of MOOCs and participation in courses has grown significantly. This is reflected in the example of one of the largest MOOC aggregators Coursera, which in November 2012 had 1.9 million Courserians, or registered students. By November 2013 this had grown to 5.5 million Courserians, representing an average growth rate of 9,860 people registering as students per day, up from 8,100 per day a year earlier.

moocs14Major MOOCs
Coursera (www.coursera.org) is still the biggest MOOC platform providing 530 different courses, up from 212 a year before. As well, the number of university and institutional partners has trebled from 33 to 107, with the majority being well-known and highly regarded universities. As mentioned above, Coursera now has 5.5 million students from 190 countries and they are taught by 730 professors/course instructors. The main types of courses students register for on Coursera are computer sciences, 41%, humanities 17% and business and management 15%

Being the biggest MOOCs aggregator, Coursera is also trying to maintain this position by being the MOOCs innovator. It is currently developing a network of learning hubs in such locations as Chennai, Helsinki, Phnom Penh, Prague, Shanghai, Moscow and Seoul to provide its students with a blended learning model that combines selected online MOOCs with face-to-face sessions with local tutors and interactions with other students. The learning hubs, mainly in developing countries, will allow students without computers to access the MOOCs offered through Coursera, thereby expanding according to their principle of providing accessible education to interested students anywhere. This is also supported by a limited number of MOOCs available in Chinese, Italian, Spanish, German and French.

Udacity (www.udacity.com) has a niche offering of approximately 30 computer science and mathematics courses with a range of topics from beginner courses to intermediate and advanced courses and feature a learning-by-doing approach. As students complete all the requirements of their course they receive a certificate of completion.

EdX (www.edx.org) owned by the prestigious academic institutions Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), draws content from a selection of their highly regarded courses. The consortium has grown during the past year to 30 university partners that are among the most highly regarded in their regions. The 94 courses now offered reflect those of more traditional universities and include biology, philosophy, physics, science, history, music, engineering, chemistry, economics and finance.

In September Edx announced a partnership with Google to develop MOOC.org, which is proposed to launch in mid-2014 as a site that will enable teachers, businesses and anybody else with an interest in learning and development or a passion for a topic to create their own digital course and have it hosted and listed as a course on the site.

Google has demonstrated an interest in education over a number of years and the partnership with Edx seems a logical progression that reflects many of Google’s grounding principles of openness and creating a platform that facilitates networks and enables people to collaborate. This development will be supported by Google’s other resources including Google Play for Education, Google Apps for Education as well as Education YouTube.

Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) is a MOOC platform originally providing courses for young learners from kindergarten to Year 12 with courses centred on mathematics and science: biology, chemistry and physics, as well as some elements of economics and history. Over the past year Khan Academy has expanded its range and level of courses to attract young leaners, as well as teachers, parents and anybody with an interest in a mathematics or science subject. Given the breadth of study levels, Khan Academy recently introduced a learning dashboard hub for their ‘world of maths’ for students to answer a series of online questions to ascertain what they know, gaps in their knowledge and where to start their learning at the level most appropriate for them. Khan Academy also provides electronic badges that reward each student’s achievements and students can analyse their learning records to identify what they have learnt and their learning performance.

FutureLearn (www.futurelearn.com) is the first United Kingdom-led MOOCs aggregator and the newest major player having launched in September 2013 with an initial trial of 20 quality courses consistent with their theme of “inspiring learning for life.” FutureLearn is owned by The Open University in partnership with 20 prestigious UK and international universities as well as the British Council, British Library and British Museum.

FutureLearn is already exploring opportunities for generating revenue from its free courses by allowing students to purchase a Certificate of Participation once they complete key elements of a particular MOOC. Students will also be able to obtain a Statement of Attainment for certain courses after paying to sit an invigilated exam at selected physical locations around the world. In order to sit for the exam students will need to provide two forms of identification that match with their student registration information. The Statement of Attainment will show the student’s name, course title, the name and logo of the university that delivered the course, the number of study hours per week required for the course and the actual percentage score the student achieved in the exam. At this stage, the Statement of Attainment will have no formal recognition by universities but it can be used as evidence by a student of continuing professional development and with potential employers to demonstrate their understanding of a particular topic.

Alison (www.alison.com) was launched from Ireland in 2007 and began delivering free, open online courses before the term ‘MOOC’ came into existence. Unlike most MOOC aggregators, Alison began generating revenue from launch by providing the online courses free but charging for extras, such as certificates and diplomas, as well as income from advertising links on the site.

Alison currently offers over 590 predominately vocational courses across certificate and diploma levels in ten languages. The certificate level courses require 1–2 hours study while the more rigorous diploma courses require 9–11 hours study. In particular, Alison allows the student to pace their own
learning with no time limit on completing a course. To meet the requirements for a certificate, a student must complete all the modules in a course and achieve at least 80% in the assessment, which can be taken multiple times, in order to purchase their certificate. An important feature of the Alison
testing facility is the option for an employer or recruiter to login to the site and have a student undertake a short quiz to test the knowledge of a student and the validity of their certificate.

Major Developments in MOOCs During The Past 12 Months moocs14-1

Rapid Increase in the Number of MOOCs
The obvious trend during the past year has been the number of MOOCs now available, both with the increase in the number of courses offered by established MOOC aggregators as well as the number of new aggregators. Instead of working through a MOOC aggregator some universities have started piloting their own MOOCs during the past year offering selected open courses for people to undertake as a taste of higher education or a particular topic. Some universities have also progressed to the stage of offering students the option to pay for online support from a lecturer and the possibility of sitting for an invigilated exam. Students who achieve a prescribed pass level in the exam can receive partial credit for a subject when they enrol in a degree program with that university.

In addition, many high profile and elite universities are now offering their standard courses as open courses where people can watch the standard lectures online and access course slides and materials. To achieve the formal qualification people need to apply, meet the entry criteria, enrol with the respective universities, pay the program fees and satisfactorily complete all the assessment requirements associated with each course.

How to Choose a MOOC
Given the rapid increase in the number of MOOCs available, a new challenge is finding the right MOOC to suit an individual’s learning aspirations, timing and content relevance. This has led to the launch of MOOC List (www.mooc-list.com) which claims to offer a complete list of all available MOOCs by category, university/entity, course length and estimated effort required to undertake the course. Having decided on a potential MOOC, it is possible to obtain further insight by using another initiative called CourseTalk (www.coursetalk.org) to check evaluations and ratings by students who have completed that course.

Multi-Lingual MOOCs
While English is the traditional language of the internet, a number of MOOC aggregators, including Coursera and EdX are starting to offer some courses in a range of languages, particularly Chinese and French. As well, the first MOOC platform for the Arab world, called Edraak, is currently under development using the Open EdX platform.

Security and Validating Students
There has been a significant focus on security and validation of students registering for MOOCs. Validation becomes an issue once a student wishes to receive certification for their participation and assessment in a MOOC and it becomes an even greater issue once a student wants to sit for an exam that has credit potential.

As Coursera has received 10 million assignments since its launch in April 2012, developing a more effective system for validating students and their assessment was a priority. In January 2013 Coursera launched the Signature Track program as a means of authenticating students and issuing validated
certificates, for a fee. Students complete an identify validation process including photograph verification and keystroke monitoring, which records a student’s typing pattern and rhythm as a biometric style of security. As students login for an exam they type a short phrase that is matched against those on their registration records.

MOOCs Assignments for Credit
While the majority of MOOCs are not recognised by universities for credit toward degree programs, there have been some developments in this area during the past year.

The American Council on Adult Education (ACE) has been investigating the possibility of MOOCs being approved for credit in a pilot with five courses offered through Coursera. While the five courses have been approved for academic credit, the approval is based on the structure and content of the courses and not on the learning outcomes. As universities have the authority to self-accredit programs and courses, they also have the discretion to determine whether they will recognise certain MOOCs and to what extent they might provide some form of credit towards a degree program. Currently, most universities are still observing the development of MOOCs without any commitment to providing credit toward formal degree programs.

However, some universities have started offering MOOCs that are units from courses of selected degree programs. Students completing the MOOC have the option of sitting for an invigilated exam and the results can provide partial credit toward a university degree course.
Respected higher education institution Georgia Institute of Technology in the United States has announced plans to offer a Master’s degree in computer science through MOOCs at a fraction of the cost of the on-campus costs. The course will be like a normal MOOC with content and materials accessible for free to anybody who registers for the program. Students who enrol in the MOOC-based degree program will pay about 20% of the normal fees and will sit for formal exams as well have access to tutors and other support services.  (The New York Times). 

Some MOOCs become SPOCs
Another development of MOOCs is SPOCs - Small Private Online Courses. Harvard University is a leader in this area and it could be a possible next step for students who complete a MOOC. People receive a taste of a particular topic or study area in a MOOC and if they want to go the next step they can participate in a SPOC. In choosing to take the next step, students are more likely to be willing to pay a fee to participate in a course that features limited class size, provides more customised tuition and offers assessed assignments that can be used as credit toward selected formal programs.

The SPOCs still incorporate many of the features of MOOCs: online, flexible accessibility for those enrolled in the course and a mix of interested participants from diverse industries and backgrounds around the world. This diverse mix with a smaller select group of participants can add to the richness of online discussions, interactions and experiences that enables participants to learn from each other.

Criticism of Low Completion Rates for MOOCs
There have been numerous articles about the low completion rates by students in MOOCs, which generally range from about 4% up to 10% of total students registered for a course. However, the reporting of the low number of completions is distorted as up to 50% of people registered for a course never watch the first video module, so they don’t actually commence the course but are included in the numbers as not completing. Most universities and higher education institutions allow students to attend the first one-to-two sessions of a course with the flexibility to withdraw before a specified census date without being included in the class numbers or incurring any grade or financial penalties.

This approach acknowledges that students may withdraw from a course due to workload, clashes with other subject timetables, work commitments, family reasons and changes in personal circumstances.

A more realistic assessment of the low completion rate would be to exclude everybody who has registered for a MOOC and never watched the first video module or until they begin the first online self-assessment test as this would better reflect those who seriously intend to undertake the course. Some people register for a course out of curiosity and once the video commences they have a better understanding of the topic to make an informed decision to continue with the course.

Research on the Role and Future of MOOCs
One significant development of the past year is the move to undertake more formal research on the role of MOOCs, the importance and contribution of MOOCs and possible future scenarios for MOOCs. This reflects the growing interest in MOOCs and the need to progress beyond the continual opinion- based articles discussing latest developments and ongoing criticisms of MOOCs compared to traditional university courses.

The MOOC Research Initiative was launched in August 2013 with the purpose of exploring the potential for MOOCs to extend access to postsecondary credentials through more personalised and more affordable pathways. The MOOC Research Institute is funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and currently has 28 MOOC research projects underway.

Summary
Given the rapid growth in the number and variety of MOOCs during the past year and the fact many universities are formally acknowledging their existence and the potential to create pathways for lifelong and continuing learning, MOOCs are more than just a fad. However, their primary role is an introduction or taste of higher education or a specific topic.

For students, the opportunity to access and undertake a MOOC on almost any subject for free gives them a taste for a particular topic that could lead to further study and possible career opportunities.

For universities and higher education institutions MOOCs are a marketing opportunity to promote the university and selected courses and programs. Exploring the potential to provide partial credit towards certain degree courses enables universities to attract a broader range of students as well as make enrolment offers to students that demonstrate commitment and successful outcomes from MOOCs.

For employers, with the increasing number of MOOCs offering certificates of participation and completion that can be validated, there is the opportunity to identify potential employees with knowledge and understanding of particular topics as well as a personal commitment to their ongoing professional development. In addition, employers can utilise MOOCs to tailor professional development for each employee to develop their knowledge, skills and capability according to the evolving needs of the organisation.

About the Author
Dr Lindsay Ryan is Director of Corporate Education Advisers. Lindsay is a strategic thinker in organisational learning and development that enables organisations to develop their capability and capacity. Utilising leading-edge research, Lindsay assists organisations adopt a strategic approach to employee training and development to ensure all corporate education and training aligns with the organisation’s goals and strategic direction. Based in Adelaide, Australia, Lindsay’s work is highly regarded internationally and he is also Visiting Fellow in Corporate Education with Birmingham City Business School in the United Kingdom. For further information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Last Chance to Join the 2013 EFMD Career Services Conference - Special Guest Speaker - Edurne Pasaban

eip winners2013

2013 EFMD Career Services Conference - Special Guest Speaker - Edurne Pasaban

There is still time to register for our first EFMD Career Services Conference that will take place on 20 - 22 November 2013 at IE Business School, Madrid, Spain.

careeropportunitiesThere is still time to register for our first EFMD Career Services Conference that will take place on 20 - 22 November 2013 at IE Business School, Madrid, Spain.

The conference is aimed at persons in charge and responsible for taking strategic decisions in the field of career services.

We are delighted to announce that the remarkable Spanish mountaineer Edurne Pasaban will lead a plenary session during the conference on Personal Development. On May 17, 2010, Edurne became only the 21st person and the first woman to climb all of the fourteen eight-thousander peaks in the World. Her first 8,000 peak had been achieved 9 years earlier, on May 23, 2001, when she climbed to the summit of Mount Everest.

"Conquering the 14 eight-thousanders in the world has taught me the keys to lead a project successfully. My ​​expeditions have trained me as a mountaineer, as a person and as a team leader. During my session I will tell my story and offered a personal analysis that can be applied to any activity that demands high performance and team management".

Click here to have more information on the conference and the programme.

Please register now and join peers from business schools around the world including IE Business School, HEC Paris, Stockholm School of Economics, Queen's School of Business, Shanghai University, Vlerick Business School, UBC Sauder School of Business, Aarhus University, WHU - Otto Beisheim School of Management, SDA Bocconi/ Bocconi University, BI Norwegian Business School, Maastricht University, Leeds University, Wits University Graduate School of Business Administration, Porto Business School.

Numerous networking opportunities will be available throughout the event so you can develop you own community of career service professionals.

If you have any questions or require further information please contact Virginie HEREDIA-ROSA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We look forward to seeing you in Madrid in November!

EFMD's Global Focus - See the Future

See-the-Future

This is the 21st issue of the magazine since it was launched in January 2007, so we can, to some extent, claim that Global Focus has “come of age”.

Global Focus was conceived as a way of improving communication between the EFMD and its members. But it was always regarded as something rather more sophisticated than a simple PR tool. It was seen as a forum for lively debate and information on the major current issues of management education and a way for EFMD to formulate, consolidate and share policy on the basis of its European underpinning and its increasingly global outreach and vision.

It has played a full part in the work of EFMD, publicising and reporting on meetings and conferences and providing background briefings and interviews with key speakers as well as, for example, explaining the development of policy in key areas such as accreditation.The seven years covered by these 21 issues have, of course, been among the most volatile and disruptive in the long history of management education. And their effects have yet to become totally apparent.

Global Focus has worked hard to keep up with these developments though a wide range of articles and features that particularly address the key issues facing EFMD member organisations. Many of the sector’s best-known and most effective thinkers and players have contributed articles or shared their thoughts in interviews.

The latest issue is no exception and features:

  • The future is out there
    Andrew Crisp reports on a major new study that explores the future challenges facing business schools

  • International Deans’ Programme 2014
    Gain unique insights into the multiple roles of deans of business and management schools in a cohort of around 20 participants from around the globe

  • Preparing leaders for tomorrow’s businesses
    The world is changing so fundamentally that business leaders who act as if the old rules still apply will find themselves and their organisations side lined or overtaken completely. However, say Thomas Malnight and Tracey Keys, those who adapt to this new world will be well placed to make the most of the opportunities it will offer

  • Moving on from Rio
    Last year’s Rio+20 UN summit may have been something of a disappointment but there were still some significant and positive outcomes say Anthony Buono, Jean-Christophe Carteron and Matthew Gitsham

  • Coping with complexity
    Personal resilience is an increasingly necessary tool to face the stress of a complex work environment. Fiona Dent and Viki Holton describe what it is and how to attain it

  • Employers still in love with MBAs
    Management education is increasingly valued by companies worldwide, according to the 2013 Corporate Recruiters Survey. Christophe Lejeune and Michelle Sparkman Renz report

  • The disappearing classroom
    Michael Desiderio describes how new technology is knocking down the walls of the Executive MBA for business leaders

  • PhDs and DBAs: two sides of the same coin?
    Laura Maguire, Elena Revilla and Angel Diaz look at the differences (and even more the similarities) between the traditional PhD programme and the newer Doctor of Business Administration

  • The IMPM innovations and teaching approach
    The International Masters in Practicing Management (IMPM) programme is 18 years old but continues to be seen as one the world’s most innovative senior management degree programmes. Leslie Breitner and Dora Koop explain how the programme has retained its freshness for so long

  • Accreditation – how to get it right
    María Helena Jaén outlines how to make the accreditation process as pain-free and rewarding as possible

  • Walking the talk: managing a management school
    It is one of the oldest and most common complaints – management schools are great at giving good advice to others but themselves rarely practise the management skills they preach. But it can be done. Loick Roche and Sabine Lauria explain how

  • ACE project offers new opportunities
    The new EFMD-backed Alliance of Chinese and European business schools (ACE) offers new opportunities for mutual understanding and increased co-operation says Martine Plompen

  • Soft skills in the business and personal world
    George Pennington provides a psychologist’s perspective on why training in soft skills is vital for business (and personal) life

  • Planting the seeds of change
    Lea Stadtler and Gilbert Probst describe how the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange came into being and the lessons it holds

  • More EQUAL than others?
    The European Quality Link (EQUAL) is one of the less well-known bodies in which EFMD is involved but is also one of the most innovative and long-standing. Irina Sennikova explains its role

Every issue of Global Focus is available digitially via this link.

We are always pleased to hear your thoughts on Global Focus, and ideas on what you would like to see in future issues. Please address comments and ideas to Matthew Wood at EFMD: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EFMD and Management Education in Africa

The interesting thing about Africa is that it is a living laboratory of the global world. There is growth potential, an abundance of natural resources but also developmental challenges as well as disparity and inequality. Derick de Jongh - based at the University of Pretoria in South Africa - believes that the continent is on the verge of a huge explosion of growth but he is worried that sustainability may get lost in the process. In African Futures - a recent Global Focus magazine article he says: “We need to challenge the basic foundation of the theory of for Upretoriainstance economics, or marketing or finance. That takes guts, courage, a very open mind – almost a new breed of faculty”. He feels optimistic about the future in that there is a huge desire and demand for improved education at all levels across the continent and business education and development can and must play a critical role in moving the continent forward.

How can African business schools best serve the often unique needs of African businesses and people? Moustapha Mamba Guisassy gives an example in “Management in Africa”.  After elaborating on internal and external factors in the changes processes, he illustrates how IAM in Senegal established a school-community partnership. The efforts include modules on African anthropology and sociology, Fulani and Mandingo languages for business, research on entrepreneurship and immersion and incubation projects.


With the aim of encouraging the writing of case material, EFMD has been organising its annual Case Writing Competition for many years. The 2012 cases related to Africa included:

  • The “Ethiopia Commodity Exchange” case documents the establishment of a transparent and efficient commodity exchange in Ethiopia. The authors also explore the balancing act between the private and public interests in this partnership.

  • “Nuru Energy” is a social venture providing lighting solutions to 800 million poor people without access to the electricity grid in sub‐Saharan Africa.  The case describes the challenges of growing a social enterprise in Africa with a dual role – making a profit and a social impact.

  • The “Beauty of Sorbet” case covers a chain of beauty salons targeting upper income women in South African metropolitan areas with a strong focus on branding.

  • The “Black Rhino” case deals with the creation of a market for legalized black rhino hunting covering elements of Creative Capitalism and Stakeholder Theory and including all its polarizing and contradictory elements.

IAMlogoEconomic growth on the African continent and the demand for local managers backs the need for raising the level of African Business Schools. Following conferences in Cape Town and Nairobi, EFMD is very pleased to go to Senegal for the fourth edition of 2013 EFMD Africa Conference which will take place from 13-15 November 2013, hosted by Groupe IAM - Institut Africain de Management in Dakar, Senegal. Traditionally attracting over 100 participants from around the globe, a variety of corporate and academic speakers will provide input and lead discussions around the theme of “Entrepreneurship and Management Education in Africa: are we miseducating our students?.

The New Frontiers of Executive Development

exed2013pictureCome and join us at the 2013 Executive Development Conference hosted by the Stockholm School of Economics IFL Executive Education on 9-11 October (Stockholm, Sweden) to explore “The New Frontiers of Executive Development”

This conference will explore the changing and evolving models of partnership between L&D providers and companies. In a fast changing world there is no longer a clear-cut provider-customer relationship but a co-creation, co-design and/or co-deployment partnership. This becomes even more challenging in situations where budget pressures require achieving more with less.

The 2013 EFMD Excellence in Practice Awards (EiP) winning cases - which were recently selected by an international jury panel - will also provide live inputs to the debates.

Join this unique dialogue where key participants of a new emerging ecosystem come together and provide perspectives from different angles: Corporations, Business Schools, Executive Development Centres and Consultancies.

Register now to join peers from Allianz; Atos; BP; CEAGA; Danone; Danske Bank; EDF; Rabobank; Raiffeisen; Repsol; Santander; Sberbank; Siemens; Volvo; IESE Business School; Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto; Melbourne Business School; Koç University; The American University in Cairo, School of Business; Duke Corporate Education; HKUST Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

Click here for the complete programme.

REGISTER ONLINE now as places are limited. 

We look forward to seeing you this fall in Stockholm for what we are sure will be a highly stimulating and exciting EFMD Executive Development Conference. if you have any question or require further information please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

See The Future - A Brave New World For Business Education

see future 2013

See The Future - A Brave New World For Business Education

A new survey on the future of business education suggests demand from students and employers is growing for a more sustainable, international and technological future.

A Brave New World For Business Education - Money Or Fulfillment, China Or Chicago, Sustainable or Shareholder Value, on Campus or Online?


A new survey on the future of business education suggests demand from students and employers is growing for a more sustainable, international and technological future.

With much uncertainty in business education during the global financial crisis, CarringtonCrisp, supported by EFMD and ABS, launched the See the Future research study to better understand some of the key issues in business education over the next few years.

Andrew Crisp, one of the authors of the See the Future report commented “Students are embracing change faster than business schools. Many of the changes have been accelerated by the global financial crisis, vast growth in international study and rapid adoption of new technologies. The generation entering business schools today have grown up with digital technology, it’s a core part of their lives, they expect it to be part of education and understand it offers the opportunity for lifestyle learning”.

Working with 37 business schools CarringtonCrisp conducted an online survey that attracted 5365 respondents from 137 different nationalities. Some of the key findings are set out below.

Value of a business education

  • More students value a business education to get a more fulfilling job rather than a more highly paid job

Business in society

  • Over 70% agree that business models need to change to better engage with society
  • More than 81% agree that business needs to be about more than just maximising shareholder value
  • However 8% of prospective undergraduates disagreed that business leaders should behave ethically at all times

Sustainability, ethics and corporate social responsibility

  • More than 80% of respondents agree that ‘sustainability and ethics should be embedded in all business education programmes’
  • Just under half of all respondents agree that ‘schools that don’t teach sustainability, corporate social responsibility and ethics should be ranked lower than those that do’
  • Over 60% of respondents agree that ‘business schools should run projects to give back to local, national or international organisations and communities’

Internationalism

  • While the USA and the UK remain the most popular destinations for international study, Singapore and China are on the rise, ranking 4th and 6th respectively with many respondents
  • More than 30% of respondents choose a international study destination because they are ‘attracted by the sporting and cultural profile of the country’
  • Over a third of all managers and directors agree that ‘graduates should learn another language as part of their degree’. 

Technology

  • More than 50% of all prospective students agree that they ‘would not study a business programme in a MOOC’
  • Around half of all managers/directors agree that ‘I am uncertain of what a MOOC offers and how it can be part of a business degree’ and that ‘I would not recruit a graduate who had only studied online’
  • More than 60% of all current students agree that ‘For academics, technology often means little more than using a PowerPoint presentation’
  • Over 70% of prospective and current students and alumni want lifestyle learning, using technology to learn around work and family commitments

Despite the uncertainty and upheaval in business education, between 70% and 80% agree that business is a force for good in society. Demand for business education seems likely to remain strong, albeit with changing content, in different locations, delivered in new formats and with changed outcomes.

Background information
Data was collected for the See the Future study in May 2013.  Respondents were prospective students, current students, alumni and employers. Copies of the full report are available for £360 (+VAT where applicable).  To purchase a copy of the full report email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or purchase by credit card through PayPal on the See the Future page.

For further information, please contact:

Andrew Crisp, CarringtonCrisp
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., +44 (0) 207 229 7373 or +44 (0) 7802 875260

Matthew Wood, EFMD
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., +32 2 629 08 10

Major Disruption Ahead - Global Focus Magazine

Welcome to the latest issue of Global Focus with content that certainly reflects the title. The coverage is indeed global, ranging from stories about China to Senegal by way of America, Canada, France and others. And the focus is acute, centering on some of the key issues facing management education in today’s uncertain world. You can view the full issue digitally here or download the individual articles as PDFs below.

logo_pdf 1. In focus and contents Issue 2 2013 cover

logo_pdf 4. Management Education for the World
A vision for business schools serving people and planet

logo_pdf 6. Challenges and opportunities in the new business education world
Dominique Turpin analyses the issues and forces that are buffeting business schools

logo_pdf 10. Major disruption ahead!
Ulrich Hommel and Christophe Lejeune discuss how technology could change the business model of business schools

logo_pdf 14. Managing complexity: an idea whose time has come
Richard Straub explains why we now need to tackle the complexity of business

logo_pdf 20. Preparing Chinese managers for global leadership
As Chinese business goes global it is time to start training its managers for leadership in a global business world say Jørgen Thorsell, Justin Bridge and Fiona Gardner

logo_pdf 24. Cadres for the common good
The 50+20 vision has ignited a flame that illuminates a path towards the future of management education. John North describes the latest steps on the journey

logo_pdf 28. Fuelling business growth through coaching and mentoring – the Swiss Re approach
The long-lasting financial crisis challenges the business case for corporate learning. Andrew Rutsch suggests that re-insurance group Swiss Re’s business-focused emphasis on coaching and mentoring may be one way forward

logo_pdf 32. Business school evolution: media insights and the future outlook
Gillian Goh, Michelle Lee and Howard Thomas examine the way the media has reported the business school “industry” over the past 20 years and what the future might hold

logo_pdf 38. Giving students the best in international education
John Oldale explains how Canada’s University of Victoria’s business school turned the search for a more international MBA into a new type of graduate programme

logo_pdf 40. Liberal education key to business success
A new form of business education that links business competences with a grounding in liberal arts and sciences is essential argues a new book. John Johnson reports

logo_pdf 44. The looming leadership gap
David Altman and Roland Smith of the Center for Creative Leadership analyse why both developed and emerging economies may well suffer a leadership gap at all levels of business

logo_pdf 48. A French debut in America
French business school SKEMA is opening campuses around the world, including a unique venture on the American mainland. Pascal Vidal details the how and why

logo_pdf 52. Management in Africa
How can African business schools best serve the often unique needs of African businesses and peoples? Moustapha Mamba Guirassy gives one example from Senegal that may serve as a guide

logo_pdf 56. UN PRME and emerging economies
Business schools from emerging economies need to embrace UN PRME, argues Umesh Mukhi, and suggests some ways they could do it

logo_pdf 60. Risk management ante portas
Ulrich Hommel and Anna Pastwa present the results of the EFMD Risk Management survey and argue that most business schools have just begun to look at this issue more seriously

We are always pleased to hear your thoughts on Global Focus, and ideas on what you would like to see in future issues. Please address comments and ideas to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

MOOCs and Executive Education

uniconlogoThis UNICON Research Report focuses on MOOCs and executive education and starts by exploring the business models of Udacity, Coursera, EdX, Udemy and 2U.

For executive education, the developments in this area may provide opportunities for extending reach within organisations, for engaging faculty in new and exciting ways, and for providing educational opportunities that are more flexible in meeting participants’ needs,” concludes author Jennifer Stine.

However, there are also the unanswered questions about the long-term sustainability of MOOCs, and about how their adoption may impact faculty or could influence the strategic direction of institutions.

The author refers to how the disruptive innovation model was specifically applied to executive education in an Harvard Business Review Blog published in January 2013 by Berkeley faculty member Morten T. Hansen. The main drivers are repeated, being that:
  • companies have online learning platforms and will be looking for content thereby creating demand,
  • hybrid and online programmes are attractive from a cost/time perspective,
  • new technologies make the online experience more appealing, and
  • networking is increasingly going online which would lessen one of the key benefits of meeting face-to-face.
Surveying the Executive Education Audience
As part of the research project a nine question survey (in English and Spanish) was sent to past participants ofinsead open enrollment executive education programmes at five differnet business schools including EFMD members INSEAD and ITAM.

Interesting findings include:
  • Affinity for on-line programmes is evenly distributed over age ranges. The highest percentage of respondents to the English language survey were in the 40-49 age range, in the Spanish language survey respondents were a decade younger.
  • Programmes that combine on-line and face-to-face are reported as the type of training having most value in terms of personal learning (according to 45.5% English and 52.5% Spanish survey respondents). A much smaller percentage favour “on-line” programmes only: 15% in the English and 20% in the Spanishitam survey.
  • When evaluating the suitability of on-line education for executive education, 52% of respondents to the English language survey, and 68% of the respondents to the Spanish language survey, feel that online learning was well or highly suited for executive education.
  • Concerning conditions making it more likely to enrol in an on-line executive education programme, lower cost is an important factor for nearly half of the respondents. However, Spanish language respondents feel more strongly about course credits.
  • 80% of survey respondents report to have taken on-line or blended programmes, only a small number reported taking MOOC-model courses.
Leaders of executive education units were also interviewed as part of the research project and reports that:
  • Several types of innovations are being explored especially around deepening the learning experience.
  • Few are worried about the erosion of value in high-touch, high-end programmes such as leadership development.
  • There is concern, however, about the more skills-based, open enrollment programmes.
The UNICON research report “MOOCs and Executive Education” by Jennifer K.Stine is free to download from the UNICON website.

IFL
MOOCs and their impact on executive education will be a topic amongst many that will be explore and debated during the upcoming EFMD Executive Development Conference to be held from October 9 to 11, 2013, hosted by Stockholm School of Economics IFL Executive Education.

The theme for the conference is: “The New Frontiers of Executive Development” and you are warmly invited to join us.
 

2013 Emerald / EFMD MENA Management Research Fund Award

emerald logoEmerald and the EFMD are pleased to announce that the deadline has been extended for their Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Management Research Fund Award.

The closing date for receipt of applications is now 1 December 2013.

The Prizes
There will be one award of £2,000 (or currency equivalent) for the winning research project, and two awards of £500 each for highly-commended runners up, to fund or part-fund these projects. The winner will be invited to receive their award at the 2014 EFMD Conference in the MENA Region and will receive a complimentary delegate pass. In addition to the research fund it is also hoped that once the research is completed its findings can be published in one of Emerald’s many excellent management research titles.

The main member of the research team must be based in a MENA country. For the purposes of this award, MENA countries are defined as: Algeria, Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malta, Morocco, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, West Bank, Gaza, Mauritania, Sudan, Turkey and Yemen.

For further information and details of how to apply please visit the webpage below: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/research/awards/mena_man.htm

This award represents a fantastic opportunity for researchers to gain significant financial support as well as international recognition. Please pass this message on to anyone else that you feel may be interested in applying.  If you have any questions regarding the award please do not hesitate to contact either:

Emma Stevenson, Emerald Head Office, UK
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: +44(0) 1274 785198

or Inês Proença, EFMD
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Tel: +32 2 629 08 10

EFMD Call to Participate in a Pilot Network Supporting Virtual Internships

ProvipWhat is a virtual internship?

International internships are gaining more and more importance in the context of the internationalization of higher education and globalization of our (professional) world. Traditional international work placements, where the learner travels abroad to the company, are not always feasible for all students because of financial, geographical, social or other reasons. For those physical placements abroad that do happen, there are also a number of difficulties to overcome, mainly related to a lack of communication between the student, the foreign company and the institution for higher education.

Virtual mobility and ICT-supported interaction can help address these issues. There are always three stakeholders involved in an international internship: the higher education institution, the student and the receiving company or organization. ICT-supported activities can be used to facilitate the interaction between these stakeholders. When the interaction between a student and a company is mainly ICT-supported, this is classed as a virtual placement.

The European project EU-VIP looked into the conditions for success when integrating virtual mobility in international internships. All of the results are available via www.euvip.eu.

The project noted that international internships are mostly the result of individual relationships or actions, while - for successful virtually supported placements - a structured implementation and collaboration between higher education institutions and companies is desirable. These issues are now being addressed in the follow-up project PROVIP (“Promoting Virtual Mobility in Placements”, 2012-2014), http://www.provip.info. This project is aimed at creating an international network of companies and study programmes in the fields of marketing, IT and engineering, interested in offering international internships to students, vip2supported or facilitated by virtual mobility. The whole internship process (before, during and after) will be supported through an online platform.

Who are we looking for?
We are looking for companies or their departments of marketing, IT and engineering willing to be part of this pilot network and its innovative approach towards international internships. We are also looking for study programmes in the same fields that can provide mature students who can work independently.
 
What can you expect from us?

For companies
  • An additional international pool of candidates for an internship
  • Contacts with higher education institutions from all over Europe, active within study fields related to your sector
  • A network that can serve as a bridge towards foreign markets, other languages and business cultures
  • Development of the online platform based on your needs and current practices regarding (international) internships
  • Input of extensive knowledge in the field of virtual mobility
For business schools and HEIs
  • An additional offer of virtual or virtually supported international internships to your students
  • Contacts with companies from all over Europe, active within sectors related to your study field
  • A possibility to further internationalize your curriculum and work on the intercultural competences of your students
  • Development of the online platform based on your needs and current practices regarding (international) internships
  • Input of extensive knowledge in the field of virtual mobility
What do we expect from you?
  • To promote your internships via the platform or to promote to your students the international virtual or virtually supported internships in addition to your “traditional” internships
  • Active participation in and use of the platform by the internship supervisor
  • To assist in platform evaluation
Timing?
  • June 2013: input of information about your needs and practices regarding internships
  • September / October 2013: short training session about the use of the platform
  • October 2013 – June 2014: pilot run of the network and platform, during this period evaluative input will be asked of the participants twice.
If you are iInterested to know more or to get involved, please contact Boriana Marinova at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

2013 EFMD Higher Education Research Conference (HERC) – Key Insights and Outlook

highereducationresearch2013The 2013 HERC that took place in Paris Dauphine University on May 23-24th was a great success, concluded Prof. Ulrich Hommel. With more than 50 scholars participating, 20 competitively selected papers and 5 keynote speeches, this second edition of HERC has confirmed the role EFMD can play as a catalyst in the field of research.

“Since its creation, the Higher Education Research Conference was conceived with a long term perspective to stimulate research on and around business schools and higher education institutions. This is an important initiative for EFMD and we are fully satisfied with the achievements so far”, said Prof. Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General of EFMD.

Of remarkable insights were the conference’s keynote speeches. Prof. Jordi Canals delivered a talk on the impact of business schools on society. He insisted that there are nowadays new dimensions of impact that have to be taken into account (social innovation, job creation, fighting poverty, etc.) as well as long term challenges that he structured around the purpose of Business Schools, their intellectual foundations and their governance.

Then, Prof. Andrew Pettigrew presented a major research project he is undertaking on the present and future of the business school professionariate and the changing rules of the game. Finally, Prof. Hellen Hazelkorn introduced a more macro research policy perspective in the conference, by explaining how higher education had moved from elite-based education to a mass-production model, therefore challenging the idea of the university as an “ivory tower”. Thinking of higher education as part of an “eco-system”, Prof. Hazelkorn talked about some major current trends for more co-production of knowledge, engaged scholarship and demonstration of impact.

In his closing remarks, Prof. Andrew Pettigrew, Chair of the Research Steering Committee, was pleased to announce that Stockholm University School of Business will be the host of next year’s conference, which will also take place in May.

Full details on the 2013 conference can be found here. More information concerning the 2014 conference will be available later in the year.

White Paper: MOOCs - Massive Open Online Courses

moocsMOOCs are on the Move: A Snapshot of the Rapid Growth of MOOCs

A White Paper by Dr Lindsay Ryan - January 2013

What are MOOCs
MOOCs are Massive Open Online Courses and they are rapidly changing the game for higher education, executive education and employee development generally. MOOCs offer free online courses covering a growing range of topics delivered by qualified lecturers from some of the most well-known universities in the world. In this age of lifelong learning, MOOCs are a means of providing learning and development to virtually everyone, anytime, anywhere in the world with internet access.

This paper presents a snapshot of current developments in MOOCs, noting that MOOCs have really only gathered momentum in the past year and are constantly developing and evolving almost on a weekly basis.

Background
The original concept for a MOOC came from academic research in the early 1960s with the idea that people could be linked by a series of computers to listen, discuss and learn about a particular topic. Now, continuous development in technology has become the enabler for virtually everybody in the world to have access to a broad and diverse range of education and learning topics.

MOOCs provide free online courses that enable people with an interest in a selected topic to study and learn through interaction with others also interested in the same topic. Other participants could be from the same organisation, city or region, learning together with people from other organisations, cities, regions and countries from around the world. MOOCs are the internet equivalent of distance education and there could be 1,000 or 100,000 participants in a single course.

MOOCs create the opportunity for vast numbers of people across the world to access learning through quality courses, content and lecturers that most would never have access to. For many people, further and higher education can seem overwhelming or beyond them. MOOCs open a world of opportunity for people in remote areas and developing countries as well as people with aspirations to achieve more with their lives. MOOCs are changing the traditional nature of education mainly being for the affluent and elite to being free and accessible to virtually everybody.

The growth of MOOCs is phenomenal. During the three months from mid-October to mid-January, including the quiet period for learning and development over Christmas-New Year, one major player, Coursera, continued to grow at the rate of 6,900 new participants (Courserians) PER DAY. Anything that grows at such a rate cannot be ignored and Coursera is just one of an increasing number of MOOC providers bringing together a diverse and expanding range of open online courses.

MOOCs started as a form of collaborative online learning with people interacting and learning from each other and being exposed to different perspectives, views and ideas. Over the past year, MOOCs have started to move to the mainstream and increasingly resembling more traditional courses, especially as a significant number of MOOCs are shorter versions of many traditional courses, and often delivered by highly qualified professors and academics whose research and academic expertise underpins the course on a MOOC.

Some of the MOOCs, such as EdX, continually research their courses to better understand how participants learn and explore ways of using the technology to transform and further enhance the learning and online experience for the participantsmoocs1.

Major MOOCs
Coursera (www.coursera.org), established by two Stanford University professors, is currently the biggest MOOC platform providing 212 different courses in such areas as: economics and business, computer sciences, biology, social sciences, music and film, medicine, health, food and nutrition, physical and earth sciences. Coursera has a consortium of 33 of the most well-known and highly regarded universities in the world delivering free online courses including Harvard, Stanford, Pennsylvania, Washington, London, Edinburgh, Toronto and Melbourne.

Udacity (www.udacity.com) has a focus on computer science courses and provides a range of topics from beginner courses to intermediate and advanced courses.

EdX (www.edx.org), owned by the prestigious academic institutions Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, draws content from a selection of their highly regarded courses.

Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) is a MOOC platform for young learners from kindergarten to Year 12 with courses centred on mathematics and science: biology, chemistry and physics, as well as some elements of economics and history.

FutureLearn (www.futurelearn.com) is the newest significant player reflecting how MOOCs are constantly changing. FutureLearn comprises a consortium of 12 major UK universities including The Open University, which has considerable experience in distance and online education, Birmingham, Warwick, Cardiff, Leeds, Bristol and St Andrews. Their web site is live but the courses and content are still being developed.

In addition, many high profile and elite universities are now offering their standard courses as open courses where people can watch the lectures online and access course slides and materials. To achieve the formal qualification people need to apply and enrol with the respective universities, pay the program fees and satisfactorily complete the assessment requirements associated with each course.

Participating in a MOOC
Participants complete a simple online registration for a course that interests them. They might want to learn more about a particular topic or it could be an introduction to consider a future study option or a possible formal university program or career direction. Each course on a MOOC is open for people over the age of 18 and, with parental approval, young learners over the age of 13. Coursera also asks participants to agree to an honour code that all the homework, quizzes and exams is their own work and that they won’t cheat or do anything that could dishonestly improve their results or dishonestly affect another person’s results.

When registering for a MOOC, participants are advised they are registering for a course and not enrolling with any of the universities delivering the courses. The courses are free and most materials and notes can be down-loaded from the course site. Occasionally other resources are recommended, such as additional books and reference materials for particular courses which can be purchased, but they are rarely prescribed as part of a course. A growing number of MOOCs offer a certificate signed by the lecturer once participants satisfactorily complete the course and there may be a fee for the certificate.

Until recently MOOCs have not provided participants with credit for further or higher education programs. However this is an area many universities are now considering, especially as one university in the US, Antioch University in Los Angeles, has started providing credit for selected MOOCs into specified college courses. Many overseas participants, especially in India, are seeking credit for their studies through MOOCs. While most MOOCs incorporate regular self-tests, projects and compulsory exams, universities are still exploring how participants can demonstrate mastery of a topic in order to be able to grant credit for the MOOC study. The American Council on Education is currently investigating a means of accrediting selected MOOCs for credit towards higher education courses.

moocs2How MOOCs Work
MOOCs allow a single teacher/lecturer to teach thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of participants in a single course delivery. With this size class, there is little participant contact with the lecturers, although some have scheduled times when they join online forums with participants to discuss various aspects of a course or provide further explanation on a topic.

MOOCs are often four to six weeks duration and the course format involves participants watching a series of short videos prepared by the lecturer detailing a particular topic theme for each of the specified weeks of the course. The format uses asynchronous learning so that participants can view the video at times that best suit them as well as their time zone. During each topic there are usually online tests that allow participants to respond and check their understanding of the concept or information presented.

In some courses participants are required to write an essay or more detailed response instead of an online multiple choice exam. In these cases, some MOOCs arrange for participants to forward their papers to five other participants for peer assessment and marking. This approach allows each participant to receive feedback and critique from five other participants. A lecturer may moderate an assessment where the spread of grades is diverse or a particular participant has a reputation for marking harshly.

The key to MOOC success is interaction among participants. Participants have interactive online tests during a course and then they will often post comments in online forums. Some MOOC lecturers try to organise face-to-face study groups in various physical locations or separate online forums for participants to promote learning and understanding through the sharing of ideas, perspectives and experiences with other participants.

MOOCs are based on Connectivism principles where learning and knowledge is created through connecting different people with a diversity of opinions. Technology is the enabler for MOOCs and with the growing use of smart phones and mobile computing, participants can maintain on-going connection with their MOOC class and interaction with other participants when they are at work, home, travelling and at any time of the day.

The Significance of MOOCs
  • MOOCs are accessible to virtually everybody who has access to the internet and the courses are free. This means there is no direct cost for a participant to explore a potential new area of interest or learning;
  • Learning occurs at times and locations that best suit the participant;
  • Participants interact with other people with a shared interest and are exposed to a diverse range of perspectives and ideas that can stimulate reflection and further interest in a topic;
  • Being part of a global class, participants can gain insight into attitudes, ideas, and trends among different populations and countries on a particular topic;
  • The continuing growth in the number of MOOCs will lead to significant choice and options for free online courses. This will allow learning and development to be tailored to the needs and/or interests of each participant;
  • MOOCs open a world of learning possibilities and promote lifelong learning for all those who are interested, able and motivated to participate;
  • Although some critics of MOOCs claim there is a low completion rate for courses, this has more positives than negatives. It means that people are interested in the concept of MOOCs and willing to investigate online learning, which most people would not have experienced previously. It also means that people have the opportunity to explore a topic without being committed to it and incurring significant costs as happens with many undergraduate programs.
  • Those people participating in a MOOC who do not complete a course are not precluding somebody else who wanted to participate but did not meet the selection criteria or cut-off levels.
Implications of MOOCs
Participants:
  • The opportunity to learn something new or completely different from their normal discipline;
  • The opportunity to appraise higher education or a specific topic without the need to apply and enrol with an educational institution and incur course fees;
  • The opportunity to learn through interacting with other participants from diverse backgrounds, experiences and countries;
  • Everybody has an equal opportunity to interact online compared to on-campus lectures which some participants find intimidating speaking or asking questions in large groups;
  • MOOCs could be used as an introduction to certain topics that lead to further study and possibly advanced standing in further education programs, subject to assessment of mastery at a prescribed level. This could reduce the duration and costs associated with completing a formal qualification.
Higher Education Providers:
  • Some higher education providers may see MOOCs as a threat, particular those who regard lectures and course materials as their intellectual property and only accessible to fee paying students;
  • Other higher education providers will see MOOCs as the opportunity to showcase some of their courses and use the MOOCs as a means of attracting new participants to undertake studies;
  • Need to develop a system for assessing student mastery of certain MOOCs and provide credit or advanced standing for participants applying for higher education programs. Participants completing a number of MOOCs and able to demonstrate mastery of the topic also demonstrate commitment to study and are likely to complete formal qualifications;
  • Should promote the environment and resources of their university, student experience and value of the qualification for participants who progress from a MOOC to enrolling in a formal university program.
Industry:
  • Employers could utilise MOOCs as part of the learning and development of employees. Those employees that show real interest, commitment and motivation for certain areas of studying could then be supported by their employer to enrol in further studies in areas relating to their employment and career development;
  • Some organisations and industries could use a series of MOOCs, selecting the most appropriate courses from a number of MOOC aggregators, as a pre-qualification for people applying to work in a particular industry, in addition to or instead of a university degree.
Employee Development Potential
MOOCs provide employers with the opportunity to develop an integrated organisation development plan and tailor a learning and development plan for each employee. Such a plan might comprise:
  • One or a series of MOOCs on topics relevant to each employee’s development needs;
  • Work-based projects that enable employees to learn and immediately apply their learning, which promotes greater understanding of concepts and better retention of the learning;
  • A mentor for each employee to discuss their work-based projects, workplace issues and career development options;
  • TED videos (Ideas Worth Spreading) to stimulate ideas, thinking and discussion within an organisation and/or workgroup;
  • YouTube-Education videos with specific topics and speakers used for employees to watch and then discuss or lead discussions with work colleagues.

The above integrated approach to employee learning and skills development could apply to all employees, from frontline, through supervisor and middle management, up to senior managers and executives.

Final Comment
MOOCs have been described in some circles as the biggest development in education for 200 years. It would appear that MOOCs are a win-win for participants, higher education providers and industry.

However, the unanswered question is: if MOOCs are free how do they pay for themselves? At this stage the universities involved in launching MOOCs seem to be following the approach adopted by one of the most successful companies of the digital age: Google. As identified by Jeff Jarvis, Google banks users, not money. When Google rolls-out a new product they worry about whether they will have users. If they have users, the money will follow (Jarvis, Jeff, (2009) What Would Google Do?, HarperCollins, New York).

About the Author
Dr Lindsay Ryan is Director of Corporate Education Advisers.
Lindsay is a thought leader, adviser and mentor to organisations assisting with organisational development and employee learning that enables organisations to develop their capability and capacity. Utilising leading-edge research, Lindsay assists organisations adopt a strategic approach to their corporate education to ensure employee training and development aligns with their goals and strategic direction. Based in Adelaide, Australia, Lindsay’s work is highly regarded internationally and he is also Visiting Fellow in Corporate Education with Birmingham City Business School in the United Kingdom.

CONTACT DETAILS:
(61) 0418 809 170
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EAIR 35th Annual Forum Rotterdam 2013 - Registration Now Open

eairThe EAIR Forum 2013 Rotterdam Forum Programme Committee and the EAIR Executive Board is delighted to hereby inform all colleagues and friends of EAIR and everyone that is interested in EAIR, that the official registration for the 35th Annual EAIR Forum “The Impact of Higher Education: Addressing the Challenges of the 21st Century” is open.

The 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum will take place from Wednesday 28 August till Saturday 31 August 2013 at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Please note: The early bird registration deadline is closing on 1 July 2013 so make sure your Forum registration is done in time! For the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum registration form, please go to: EAIR Registration.

For more information regarding the Forum registration, please go to the Conference website. Information about the preliminary timetable, hotels, travel, academic events, social events, tracks and keynote speakers can be found on the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum website.

The Erasmus University is centrally located near the river in one of the most vibrant cities of the Netherlands. Being the main port of Europe, Rotterdam is a multicultural experience with outstanding museums and restaurants and well known for its modern architecture. The Erasmus University itself has a world wide reputation in the areas of economics, business administration and health, strengthened by law, social sciences, history and arts, and philosophy. Students from all over the world follow Dutch and English language bachelor’s programmes as the basis for leading international master’s specialisations at the interface of economics, health and society.

Please visit http://www.eair.nl/forum/rotterdam regularly for the updated news about the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum.

Henry Mintzberg Workshop on Developing Practicing Managers and their Organisations

henrymThe Henry Mintzberg, IMPM & EFMD Special Workshop will take place on 16th May in Brussels on the theme: "Developing Practicing Managers and their Organisations".

The workshop will be led by led by Henry Mintzberg, Cleghorn Professor of Management Studies, McGill University, Desautels Faculty of Management, CA together with his two colleagues Dr. Leslie K. Breitner, Cycle Director, IMHL and IMPM Programmes and Dora Koop, Director, McGill University Executive Institute.

Do not miss this unique opportunity to discuss new ways to engage in management education and development with academics, training professionals and staff of corporate academies. Join colleagues and peers from business schools including INSEAD, IESE, Rotterdam School of Management, Vlerick Business School, ESCP Europe and Oxford Said Business School as well as corporate representatives from L'Oréal, GDF Suez University, SAFRAN, Eli Lilly and Company, Rabobank and Novo Nordisk.

The workshop will tap into the years of learning from the International Masters in Practicing Management (IMPM.org), founded in 1996, and a family of spin-off programs that have been designed to build on that experience. Picking up where Henry Mintzberg left off in his book Managers not MBAs,, the IMPM has made significant progress in rethinking education and development for people well into their managerial careers.  The pedagogy is built around the belief that managers will invest by building on their own experiences and involves a number of pedagogical innovations such as; managerial mindsets, morning reflections, managerial exchanges, friendly consulting (on managers’ challenges), competency sharing, IMpact teams, and novel seating arrangements.

Participants in this workshop will not only hear about these new ideas but also live them in the design.  To open, they will be asked to share their concerns for management education and development, and to close, they will reflect on the consequences of the day’s learning for their own programmes.

If you have any questions please contact Virginie HEREDIA-ROSA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Announcing the Winner of the "Best of the Best" 2012 EFMD Case Writing Competition

case-award2012The winning case from the "Best of the Best" category has now being evaluated by ecch and EFMD is delighted to announce that -

Inclusive Business Models: Planting the Seeds of Change: The Ethiopia Commodity Exchange, Lea Stadtler and Gilbert Probst, University of Geneva, CH 

has been selected as the 2012 "Best of the Best Case Award". Many congratulations to Lea Stadtler and Gilbert Probst from the University of Geneva.

"Our case illustrates the challenging and inspiring journey of establishing an efficient commodity exchange in Ethiopia by means of an inclusive public-private partnership. Given the technological challenges in the country and the deep mistrust of many of the stakeholders involved, this was no easy task. Once the seeds of change had been planted, however, the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX) experienced a period of strong growth, which, in turn, led to new challenges.

We are really honored to receive the "Best of the Best" category of the internationally well-known EFMD Case Writing Competition. It is also a great timing since it conincides with the creation of our Geneva PPP Center: a university center to serve as a hub and catalyst for PPP-related research projects. Our thanks go to all case stakeholders involved, especially Dr. Eleni Gabre-Madhin, and the reviewers who nominated the case."


Choosing the “Best of the Best” award is always so difficult due to the outstanding nature of all the case involved so we would like to once again congratulate all of the Category Winners.

 2012 Category Winners

  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Novo Nordisk: Managing Sustainability at Home and Abroad, written by Jette Steen Knudsen, Copenhagen Business School, DK and Dana Brown, EMLYON Business School, FR

  • Entrepreneurship: ENVIU: Starting World Changing Companies, written by Luca Berchicci and Giovanna Domingues Sanches, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, NL

  • Family Business: Bavaria and the Swinkels Family: Brewing a Sticky Brand, written by Benoit Leleux and Jan Van der Kaaij, IMD, CH

  • Finance and Banking: Irish Schools: Sovereign Risk in Social Infrastructure PPP, written by Pierre Hillion and Jean Wee, INSEAD

  • Emerging Chinese Global Competitors: Hard Choices: Best Buy and Five Star in China_Cases A , B and the Industry Note, written by Terence Tsai, Zhu Jianhua and Xu Leiping, CEIBS (China Europe International Business School), CN

  • Supply Chain Management: Danfoss - Global Manufacturing Footprint, written by Torben Pedersen and Jacob Pyndt, Copenhagen Business School, DK

  • Euro-Mediterranean Managerial Practices and Issues: Launch of Durra: Women in Islamic Banking, written by Alexandra Roth and David T.A. Wesley, Northeastern University, US

  • African Business Cases: Nuru Energy (A): Financing a Social Enterprise - Nuru Energy (B): From Breakdowns to Breakthroughs, Filipe Santos and Anne-Marie Carrick, INSEAD

  • Public Sector Innovations: Restoring the British Museum, written by Anand Narasimhan and Jean-Louis Barsoux, IMD, CH

  • Responsible Leadership: VOLTIUM, Inc, written by Eloy del Potro, Juan Carlos Vasquez Dodero, Jose Ramon Pin Arboledas and Guido Stein, IESE Business School, ES

  • Inclusive Business Models: Planting the Seeds of Change: The Ethiopia Commodity Exchange, Lea Stadtler and Gilbert Probst, University of Geneva, CH  

  • MENA Business Cases: Chabros International Group: A World of Wood, written by Paul W. Beamish and Bassam Farah, Richard Ivey School of Business, CA

  • Latin American Business Cases: Veja: Sneakers With a Conscience, written by Oana Branzei and Kim Poldner, Richard Ivey School of Business, CA

  • Indian Management Issues and Opportunities: Bayer CropScience in India (A): Against Child Labor, written by Charles Dhanaraj, Indiana University Kelley School of Business, US, Oana Branzei and Satyajeet Subramanian, Richard Ivey School of Business, CA

We would like to thank all of our sponsors of their continued support of the Case Writing Competition. Abstracts for the cases are available on the EFMD website and all of the cases are available on the ecch website.

The 2013 competition will open twoards the end of May. If you would like further information please contact Inês PROENÇA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The GRLI Announces a Strategic Alliance with EFMD and AACSB International

grliBrussles, Belgium (March 21st, 2013) – Announced today, the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative (GRLI), has entered into a long-term strategic partnership with EFMD and AACSB International (AACSB). The agreement will see two of the most influential global voices in management education working closely with the GRLI, a network of forward thinking companies and business schools, to focus on an important message: that business and business schools need to work collectively to devote greater attention to developing responsible companies and leaders in the future.

Mark Drewell, CEO of the GRLI said, “Over the past nine years we have learnt a great deal about catalysing change in the complex interface between management education, business and society. This move creates a platform on which we can transform success into significance as we work to scale our impact in partnership with EFMD and AACSB International.”

Eric Cornuel, Director General and CEO of EFMD said “The GRLI, which we co-founded with the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) in 2004, plays an important role already in providing direction, support, and visibility to what business schools are doing to foster responsibility and sustainability.  However while there has been some initial success, much more remains to be accomplished. GRLI will become the armed wing of our shared ambitions at EFMD and AACSB to accelerate change.”

Commenting on the announcement, AACSB International President and CEO John Fernandes said: “In recent years, the role of business as a sustainable and socially responsible enterprise has risen consistent with the world’s demand for accountability. Through our accreditations and services, AACSB and EFMD are important stakeholders in addressing society’s objectives of sustainability, social responsibility and ethical leadership. This move increases the intensity of our focus in this area, and will enable both organisations to serve our members more fully as they seek to address the challenges of 21st century management education.”

EFMD and AACSB will join GRLI’s current Board of Directors, by each appointing two representatives that will participate in governing decisions. The two organizations will also provide financial support to bolster GRLI’s capacity to achieve its mission.

Detailed  discussions will take place amongst the three organisations over the coming months to turn the agreement into a practical programme. This will include making knowledge and expertise developed by the GRLI accessible to EFMD and AACSB members, as well as participation in GRLI’s pipeline of projects and its various international events.

For further information contact:
Mark Drewell (GRLI) +44 7805 568 493 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Editors Notes

About the GRLI (www.grli.org)
The Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative (GRLI) is a worldwide partnership of companies and business schools/learning organisations working together in a laboratory of change to develop a next generation of globally responsible leaders. The GRLI engages in thought leadership, advocacy and projects to achieve measurable impact. It’s current projects to support the development of responsible management education are concentrated around the implementation of the 50+20 Agenda, a blueprint of management education in service to society launched at Rio+20 in June 2012.

About EFMD (www.efmd.org)
EFMD is a leading international network of business schools and companies (810 members / 82 countries) at the forefront or raising the standards of management education and development globally. EFMD runs the EQUIS and EPAS accreditation systems as well as the EFMD Deans Across Frontiers programme (EDAF) and is one of the key reference points for management education worldwide.

About AACSB International (www.aacsb.edu)
AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), founded in 1916, is an association of more than 1,300 educational institutions, businesses, and other organizations in 81 countries and territories. AACSB's mission is to advance quality management education worldwide through accreditation, thought leadership, and value-added services.
As a premier accreditation body for institutions offering undergraduate, master's, and doctorate degrees in business and accounting, the association also conducts a wide array of conferences and seminar programs at locations throughout the world. AACSB's global headquarters is located in Tampa, Florida, USA and its Asia Pacific headquarters is located in Singapore.

See the Future - A New Study About the Future of Management Education

futureIt seems that not a day passes without an article about the uncertain future for higher education.  However, much of this is opinion and crystal ball gazing.  To provide clear direction for any school thinking about the future, CarringtonCrisp, the education market research specialists, working with EFMD, are planning a special new group market research study, titled 'See the Future'. 

Taking part will cost only €800.


The study will provide an overview on the future of management education from the student and business perspective – the role it should play in society, its position in higher education, the value to the potential student, the support it can provide for business and data on key trends in the marketplace. We will question four key audiences: prospective students, current students, alumni and corporates and ask these groups about five key areas:future2

  •     attitudes to business,
  •     the value of a business education,
  •     sustainability and CSR,
  •     internationalisation, and
  •     the role of technology.
And provide reports based on audience, geography and business school, as well as a global view of the market place. The aim is to have at least 100 business schools take part and to capture the views of more than 10,000 respondents.  The study will take place in late April/early May with results from mid-late June.

For further details on how to take part please contact CarringtonCrisp by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by telephone on +44 207 229 7373 or Matthew Wood This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. +32 2 629 08 10.

We hope that your school will take part in this fascinating study.

Coaching and Mentoring as Motors of Change - 15 March

Join us for the EFMD Sharing Best Practice CLIP workshop hosted by SwissRe in Munich on 14 (evening) - 15 March 2013!! The workshop will examine the many different areas and ways in whichmentoring coaching and mentoring techniques can be deployed in support of strategic L&D objectives.

  • How does coaching and mentoring fit into a company’s strategic learning processes?
  • To what extent can the learning outcomes of coaching and mentoring be considered organisational and not just individual?
  • How should the ‘targets’ for development through coaching and mentoring be chosen from a strategic perspective?
  • What learning and development objectives should be set for the different target groups?
  • How does coaching and mentoring fit into the learning organisation’s toolkit of didactic techniques?
  • How should coaching and mentoring be combined with other L&D techniques?
  • What is the place of coaching and mentoring in group-oriented leadership programmes?
  • How can the effectiveness of these techniques be measured?
  • How can the cost be justified?   
swiss rePrisca Peyer-Ehrbar, Head of SwissRe Academy, will share her experience with you. Other speakers will include Justus Boeckheler, Vice President, Center for Expertise Development & Change, BASF; Philippe Bonnet, Vice President, Global Head Learning & Education, Essilor International; Andrew Clayton, Head of Group Learning Allianz and Charles Jennings, Former Chief Learning Officer for Reuters and Thomson Reuters, Founding Director of The 70:20:10 Forum.

Join colleagues from Airbus, Alcatel-Lucent, Allianz, Atos, Baloise, BASF, Coca-Cola, Daimler, DuPont de Nemours, EDF, Eli Lilly, Gas Natural Fenosa, GE, ING Insurance, Maersk Line, Rabobank, Siemens, ThyssenKrupp, UBS and UniCredit. For more information and registration please click here.

About the EFMD Sharing Best Practice CLIP Community

Led by representatives of EFMD and EFMD's Chief Learning Officer Community, HR and learning & development professionals meet twice a year to work in depth on the key challenges modern corporate learning functions are facing. The CLIP accredited companies share their experience with complementary inputs supported by other CLOs and/or Business Schools. These events are designed for senior corporate HR and learning & development practitioners from EFMD company members network and selected guests. As an interactive forum, this community of practitioners is unique in corporate learning and development in Europe.

For more information, please contact Shanshan GE  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

What does the future hold for academic research?

imagesMost deans of leading business schools would agree that being a top-performing faculty member is synonymous with being a top researcher. The production of widely cited A-level articles has become the core ingredient for a successful academic career, leading to peer recognition, tenure and ever-larger pecuniary rewards in the form of higher base salaries and bonuses.

At the same time, though, many practitioners would argue that the way academics are conducting research is the very essence of what is wrong with business schools today. They claim that research methodologies and outcomes are too often detached from the realities of managing enterprises and that researchers lack the motivation as well as all too often the ability to credibly surpass Andrew Pettigrew’s double hurdle of generating academically meaningful as well as practically relevant knowledge.

What is particularly worrying about this long-standing debate is the apparent unresponsiveness of the business school community, which continues to operate in the “we know best” mode. Business schools are facing environmental dynamics that will eventually make change inevitable. PhD programmes are not producing enough graduates to fulfil the hiring needs of a rapidly growing sector. Market entry by non-research for-profit providers will produce additional challenges to a system where business schools are using a large part of their resources to support a seemingly zero-return activity. There are effectively two pieces to the puzzle.

Researchers argue that they are, above all, writers seeking recognition from their peers. In contrast, communication experts claim that business schools need to improve on their customer orientation. They should produce research that meets the real needs of their stakeholders in terms of content and packaging.

Building a bridge between these two positions is not impossible. Business schools are currently operating based on model where researchers are drifting like particles in institutional space, where they have complete freedom to interact with other particles within or across institutional boundaries and where they eventually release output that is measured by a centuries-old metric.

But why not define academic research as a starting point of an innovation chain? It would allow researchers to focus on what they know best, the production of peer-reviewed articles. It would also, however, introduce the research outcomes into a refinement process that leads to spin-off outputs such as case studies, podcasts,  business simulations, policy position papers, open source e-learning content and interactive communication with corporate partners.

Embedding researchers into vertical innovation chains might also foster mutual learning with practitioners, which will affect the direction of research \and thereby address the main criticism of the corporate world.

In sum, business schools should reflect on how to organise their research activities better in order to justify the significant resource commitments. Laissez faire, with some moderation using a system of external, peer-based controls, has so far not enabled them to pass the double hurdle test. Existing research capabilities could possibly be made better us of by reversing the atomisation of research production and by creating support structures for top researchers.

Proceeding on this line must and should not infringe on the academic freedom of the individual researcher as since this would probably lead to harmful feedback effects in terms of research quality and productivity. However, business schools should attempt to break open their research silos and let the wider community that surrounds them participate in the benefits of their knowledge-generation activities.

Ulrich Hommel, Director of Research & Surveys at EFMD

Record Year for Entries to the Case & Doctoral Awards

caseprize20122012 has been a record year for entries to the EFMD Case Writitng Competition and the EFMD / Emerald Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards. 210 cases were submitted to the Case Writing Awards and 422 papers were submitted to the Doctoral Research Awards.

We would like to warmly thanks all of the sponsors for their support of the Case Awards and thank Emerald for the long-standing partnership in developing the Doctoral Awards. We would also like to thanks all of the people who have submitted cases and papers and wish them well in the judging stages! The winners will be announced in 2013.

EFMD Case Categories

EFMD / Emerald Doctorla Reserach Award Categoriesemerald logo

The Case & Doctoral Awards run annually so please make sure you school, faculty & students take part next year. If you have any questions concerning the EFMD Case Awards please contact - Ines Proença (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). If you require any further information on the Doctoral Research Awards please contact Emma Stevenson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Innovation Beyond Technology within the Asia-Pacific Region - EFMD supports the AAPBS Annual Meeting

aapbsbannerEFMD is supporting the AAPBS Annual Meeting - “Innovation Beyond Technology within the Asia-Pacific Region" on the 27-28 of November in Kuala Lumpur hosted by the International Business School, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM-IBS).

The theme, ‘Innovation Beyond Technology’, is timely given the increased challenges in the business and management education landscape. Accelerating economic growth in the region, increased demands for quality management education, heightened competition among program providers, depleting federal funding, diversity of consumer profiles are some of the challenges that business schools are forced to face and address. Innovation is a must if business schools want to prosper in this environment.

The meeting provides a platform for AAPBS members and participants to exchange ideas and share best practices about how the business schools in the Asia Pacific region may pursue innovation. Members and participants may expect fruitful discussions on innovative areas in school governance, management, teaching and learning, research and publications, student services and funding models for the cost sustainability of business schools. It is hoped that the meeting will contribute to AAPBS’ continuous efforts towards the advancement of business and management education in the Asia Pacific region, create a solid Asian business and management education model, and establish constructive collaborations among the participants.

"One thing that is certain is that UTM-IBS is looking forward to showering you with Malaysian hospitality", Professor Dr. Mohd Hassan Bin Mohd Osman, Dean, UTM-IBS

Professor Michael Osbadeston, Director of Quality Service at EFMD will be speaking in one of the plenary sessions on "Innovations in Business Schools". The full conference programme and speakers details are available via these links - AAPBS programme & AAPBS speakers.

For details on registration please visit - AAPBS registration. If you have any questions or require further information please contact - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: copies available to order now

prmeguideThe Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing sustainability at the heart of management education, created by the UN Global Compact initiative, Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) was presented at the Rio+20 Earth Summit in June 2012 and is now offered for sale in print for the first time by publishers, GSE Research.

The book features 63 case studies from 47 institutions, representing 25 countries across Asia, Oceania, Latin America, USA and Canada, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The business schools’ experiences are classified into six sections, corresponding to the Six Principles of PRME (Purpose, Values, Method, Research, Partnership, and Dialogue) and offering useful advice on setting up and implementing specific aspects of each. This important compilation will be an inspiration for all forward-thinking Business Schools across the world, especially those who are keen to embrace the PRME principles and put sustainability at the heart of their operations.

“Seeking to inspire the further integration of responsible management education, real world examples are highlighted from around the globe on fostering a sustainability culture, changing curricula, enabling faculty or managing and consolidating. This is a unique publication in that the 63 cases illustrate successful and relevant approaches in their different contexts, moreover the standardised structure around challenges, actions taken and results provides the most effective source of inspiration. A must-read on the transformation of management education and on how our institutions are placing sustainability at the heart of management education.”
Prof. Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General of EFMD

The guide is now available to purchase in print, priced at £29.95 (excluding shipping). To purchase your copy of the Inspirational Guide, please visit the GSE online shop: http://www.gsepublishing.com

For more information on PRME visit - http://www.unprme.org/index.php

Last chance to enter the 2012 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards

emerald logoEFMD & Emerald Group Publishing Limited seek to celebrate excellence in research by sponsoring the 2012 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards.

Award-winning entries will receive a cash prize of €1,500 (or currency equivalent), a certificate, a winners' logo to attach to correspondence and the prospect of an offer of publication in the sponsoring journal - either as a full paper or an executive summary - at the discretion of the Editor(s). In addition, a number of Highly Commended Awards will be bestowed. This year there are 12 categories:

Interdisciplinary accounting research
Category sponsored by Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal

Marketing research
Category sponsored by European Journal of Marketing

Hospitality management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Operations and production management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Operations & Production Management

Logistics and supply chain management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management

Information science
Category sponsored by Journal of Documentation

Educational leadership and strategy
Category sponsored by Journal of Educational Administration

Knowledge management
Category sponsored by Journal of Knowledge Management

Management and governance
Category sponsored by Management Decision

Human resource management
Category sponsored by Personnel Review

Leadership and organization development
Category sponsored by Leadership & Organization Development Journal

Health Care Management
Category sponsored by Journal of Health Organisation and Management

If you are unsure of which category to submit to please feel free to contact us, and after consultation with our Editorial team, we can suggest that which is most appropriate.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the Awards, the research must address an issue that is of importance to one of the various subject areas listed above. The Awards are open to those who have completed and satisfied examination requirements for a Doctoral award, or will do so, between 1 October 2009 and 1 October 2012, and have not applied previously for one of these Awards.

Submission requirements
1. Researchers must apply online using the application form at: http://ww2.emeraldinsight.com/awards/odra.htm
2. The following documents will be required electronically:
  • Covering letter – as part of this please state whether or not your doctoral research has been published and/or will be published in any form (conference paper, article, peer reviewed journal, etc)
  • Executive Summary – paper that summarises the Doctoral research. The Executive Summary should not exceed 1,000 words (reference lists and presentation of data, as either Tables or Figures, do not count towards this total).
  • Letter of recommendation/reference from a supervisor/senior faculty member. For short-listed applicants, further contact may be made with the referee.
  • Contact details of external examiner(s).
3. Applicants must only submit to one category.

Judging criteria
The entries will be judged by the Editor(s) and at least one Editorial Advisory Board member of the sponsoring journal. Entries will be judged on the following criteria:

1. Significance/implications for theory and practice.
2. Originality and innovation.
3. Appropriateness and application of the methodology.
4. Analysis and presentation of the data.
5. Quality of the literature review.

Short-listed applicants may be required to answer further questions as appropriate from the judging panel. Winners will be required to submit an unpublished paper, sole- or joint-authored, derived from the research, within six months of winning the Award. The Editors reserve the right not to select a winning paper if, in their judgment, none of the entries is considered satisfactory.

Please note that the decision of the judges is final. Due to the large number of submissions, applicants will not receive any feedback.

Key dates
The closing date for applications is 1 October 2012.

Winners will be announced in January 2013.

Contact details
For further information or if you have any queries, please contact:

Emma Stevenson
External Relations Executive
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Howard House
Wagon Lane
Bingley BD16 1WA
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1274 785198
Fax: +44 (0)1274 785200
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Call for Papers: The Unfulfilled Promise of Responsible Management Education

Special issue call for papers from the Journal for Management Developmenjmdcovert
The Unfulfilled Promise of Responsible Management Education (RME)

Guest Editors:    

  • Eric Cornuel, European Foundation for Management Development, Belgium & HEC Paris, France
  • Ulrich Hommel, EBS Business School, Germany & European Foundation for Management Development, Belgium
Theme
A. The Context
Business schools have been on the defensive since the beginning of the financial crisis, not least for apparently failing to acknowledge their role in educating responsible managers. This debate has triggered a number of interesting and valuable responses from business schools such as the introduction of degree programmes strongly emphasizing RME-related aspects, the management oath initiative as well as fruitful and still on-going debates on adjusting international accreditation standards. We have further witnessed various organizational efforts to give responsible management education a higher priority in research and teaching such as the PRME initiative (http://www.unprme.org/) or the 50+20 initiative (http://50plus20.org/).
 
Nevertheless, the general view prevails that business schools as a whole are making only very gradual and still minor progress in addressing these issues on an institutional level. It is also argued that the laggardness of immersing themselves in this debate has led business schools to become increasingly detached from the business world, which is addressing these issues with much more fervour. And indeed, it appears that RME activities are still mostly kept in isolated silos in business schools and therefore do not seem to impact the full range of institutional activities. The purpose of this special issue is to address this phenomenon and develop explanations for why responsible management education remains largely an unfulfilled promise to this day.

B. Purpose
The purpose of this special issue is to advance the understanding of the structural barriers and resistances limiting the business schools’ ability and willingness to embrace the principles of responsible management education. The submissions can relate their arguments to any of the common themes in the business school and higher education literature, but are not limited to it. Examples are governance and faculty incentive management, accreditations and rankings, entrepreneurialism and corporate relevance as well as globalization / internationalization of business school activities. It is expected that papers will offer an appropriate appreciation of the RME-specific literature as well. Submissions are particularly encouraged from researchers in other fields such as higher education, economics, political science or philosophy. They are in a position to add valuable outside-in perspectives, which may be enriching the viewpoints put forward by the special issue.

C. Research Questions
This call is seeking contributions on any aspect of the special issue theme. Suggested questions to be explored include (please note that these questions are only intended to serve as examples and are not meant to restrict submissions in any way):
  • Is RME another management fad with negligible relevance for practicing managers?
  • What role do market-based performance metrics play in preventing business schools from embracing RME more fully (in strategy, research, teaching, etc.)?
  • Are ambiguities in defining and measuring RME preventing more widespread adoption?
  • To what extent do business school governance and management practices explain why RME still retains its orphan-like status?
  • To what extent do discrepancies in the philosophical foundations of management science and economics vs. RME create intellectual resistance to the widespread adoption of RME?
  • Why do the diverse cultural traditions and religious values around the globe or differences in economic development not have a more noticeable impact on the adoption and interpretation of RME?
We welcome submissions of high-quality papers on all topics related to the theme of the special issue. Contributions may develop theoretical frameworks, synthesize the existing body of knowledge, present strategic problem-solving applications or offer empirical evidence. Successful submissions will employ accurate methodologies and develop their arguments on the basis of rigorous analysis.

Submissions
To be considered for publication in this special issue, manuscripts must be received by January 31, 2013. Papers submitted will be subject to a minimum double-blind peer review process to ensure that this special issue maintains the excellent reputation and record of the Journal of Management Development. The journal website is located at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jmd.htm.

Please read through the author guidelines on this site before submitting your paper. Submissions to Journal of Management Development are made using ScholarOne's Manuscript Central http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmd. Full instructions can be found on the author guidelines site. As a guide, articles should not exceed 5,000 words in length. A title of not more than twelve words should be provided.

Queries should be submitted directly to the special issue co-editor, Ulrich Hommel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Call for Papers - Risk Management in Higher Education – Managing Academia in Turbulent Times

Special Issue Call for Papers: International Journal of Educational Managementijemcover
Risk Management in Higher Education – Managing Academia in Turbulent Times

Guest Editors:     
  • Eric Cornuel, European Foundation for Management Development, Belgium & HEC Paris, France
  • Ulrich Hommel, EBS Business School, Germany & European Foundation for Management Development, Belgium
Theme
A. The Context
Higher education institutions are operating in an increasingly dynamic environment. Demographic shifts, rising market transparency and accountability, changing consumption patterns and the emergence of new competition are exposing the higher education sector to levels of risk never encountered before. Deregulation and new funding models are forcing presidents, deans and senior managers to embrace market challenges with the effect of further enhancing performance volatility. As a consequence, what has been said about management in general increasingly applies to higher education management as well: Institutions are managed well if they manage their risk position well. In addition, regulatory oversight bodies are beginning to acknowledge the need to align the intensity of supervision and control with institutional risk-taking.

Despite the high priority assigned to risk management in a practical context, the academic literature has largely ignored this emerging field of research so far. In the light of the impact of recent economic downturns on higher education and the concerns how continued turmoil in financial markets may put a considerable number of institutions into a state of budgetary distress, there is clearly a need to examine this issue more closely from a research perspective. Over the past two decades, risk management has developed into a vibrant field of research, in particular in finance and operations management. In contrast, the higher education literature on risk management is dominated by practice-based publications and still lacks an appropriate academic research foundation. The special issue intends to address this shortcoming.

B. Purpose
The purpose of this special issue is to advance the understanding of the specific nature of risk management in higher education institutions. With this perspective in mind, this Call for Papers seeks to expand knowledge in this area and provide a discussion forum for researchers in higher education as well as business & management. It presents a unique opportunity for researchers to gather and explore previously untapped synergies between these so far largely separate areas of research.
The special issue invites conceptual and empirical papers, presenting cutting edge research on risk management in higher education. Papers may be theoretical or applied but should in all cases have a clear relevance to risk management practices in higher education.

C. Research Questions

This call seeks contributions on any aspect of risk management in higher education. Papers can for example focus on:
  • Risk management methodologies and risk management performance
  • Financial and operational risks (and the interaction between them)
  • Incentive issues, governance and regulation
  • Strategic decision-making and risk taking
Suggested questions to be explored include (please note that these questions are only intended to serve as examples and are not meant to restrict submissions in any way):
  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of risk management methodologies currently used in the higher education sector?
  • What is the relationship between financial performance and competitive positioning of higher education institutions?
  • How effective are different governance models in controlling risk-taking behaviour of senior management?
  • What is the impact of internationalization on risk-taking behaviour of higher education institutions?
  • How are different trends (e.g. demographic change, changing funding models, rising market orientation, managerialism, shift towards blended/online/distance learning) affecting performance volatility and financial health of higher education institutions?
  • What is the impact of deregulation and privatization on risk taking in higher education?
  • How can established risk management methodologies of the corporate sector (e.g. Cash Flow at Risk) be used to measure and mitigate risk exposures in higher education?
  • How is regulatory oversight impacting risk-taking behaviour of higher education institutions?
  • What are the need and scope of risk-based regulation of the higher education sector?
We welcome submissions of high-quality papers on all topics related to risk taking, risk management and risk regulation in a higher education context. They may use any type of higher education institution as a focal point (universities or subunits thereof such as business schools, public or private, non-profit or for-profit). Contributions can develop theoretical frameworks, synthesize the existing body of knowledge, present strategic problem-solving applications or offer empirical evidence. Successful submissions will employ accurate methodologies and develop their arguments on the basis of rigorous analysis.
 
D. The Journal
The International Journal of Educational Management provides those interested in the effective management of the educational process with a broad overview of developments and best practice in the field, with particular reference to how new ideas can be applied worldwide. The journal contains material relating to innovation in educational management across the spectrum, the development of educational delivery mechanisms, and the creation of an environment in which the management of resources provides the most efficient outputs achievable on an international basis to allow the sharing of new initiatives. Each article is submitted to a double blind-review process to ensure that academic integrity is maintained

Submissions
To be considered for publication in this special issue, manuscripts must be received by February 15, 2013. Submissions must comply with the author guidelines for this journal:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ijem

Expressions of interest to submit a paper and other queries should be sent directly to the special issue co-editor, Ulrich Hommel (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Latest issue of EFMD's Global Focus now online

issue  2012 coverThe latest issue of EFMD's magazine Global Focus is now available online in English & Chinese. Highlights include Deans Across Frontiers, Customised Executive Learning – A Business Model for the 21st Century, Unlikely Heroes, From Rankings to Ratings and What is the European Management School Model?

1 In Focus

4 Talking Shop
EFMD celebrates its 40th birthday
Tomorrow's MBA
Mathias Falkenstein joins EFMD
EQUIS accreditation for three new business schools

6 International Deans’ Programme

8 Deans Across Frontiers
As EFMD launches its Deans across Frontiers initiative, Professor Chris Greensted looks at its mission of promoting excellence in business and management education worldwide

12 Customised Executive Learning – A Business Model for the 21st Century
A new design for tailored executive education is emerging – Gert-Jan van Wijk and Jamie Anderson report on the Platform model

17 What is the European Management School Model?
Over the last ten to fifteen years the identity, importance and legitimacy of european management schools has been strongly established in the context of the ‘business of business schools’, writes Howard Thomas

22 Business Schools and Society – Opportunities and Accountability
Business schools can create new opportunities, says Alfons Sauquet, if they continue to take stock of their role in society

26 Risky Business? Do you know what your risk exposures are?
Institutional and regulatory perspectives from Ulrich Hommel, Roger King, and Anna Pastwa, who open the debate on risk management in the business school community

30 Unlikely Heroes
A 21st century publishing revolution? John Peters looks at the post-publication environment and its unlikely heroes

34 Defining the role of business schools
Baback Yazdani, Dean of Nottingham Business School, looks at how business schools across the globe might define their role

38 From Rankings to Ratings
Roberts Rubin, Eric C Dierdorff and Fredrick P morgeson look at the significant changes to mBa programme quality, due in part to media ranking

42 Busting Boundaries to Accelerate Business Transformation
A recent EFMD CLIP workshop shedded light on siemens’ transformation from troubled company to role model. Andrew Rutsch explains how Corporate Learning played a key role in this strategic renewal

46 Using “action strategy” to transform a business school
George Yip reports on his programme of action strategies to transform Rotterdam School of Management

50 Case by Case
Stephanie Hussels describes how Cranfield uses case study writing as a means of integrating research, teaching, and practice on the mBa course

54 Closing the gap
Lin squires and elmar husmann show the significant gap between the perception and reality of Open education

56 The Human Factor: the emerging user experience discipline
William m. Gribbons explains why, increasingly, leading organisations demand a balance of the user perspective with the traditional focus on technology, and how business schools can fulfil this need

60 GMAC

Dr Tony Kinder on selecting for success

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