Nearly 9 in 10 Companies Plan to Hire MBA Graduates in 2017

International hiring plans, especially for graduates of MBA and business master’s programmes, remain steady despite recent political uncertainty, according to the latest 2017 GMAC's Corporate Recruiters Survey Report, conducted in conjunction with EFMD and MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance (MBA CSEA).

2017 gmac corporate recruiters web releaseDespite the political uncertainty about the status of immigration and work visas in the United States and other parts of the world, companies are keen to hire graduates from this year’s MBA and business master’s programs, including international candidates,” said Sangeet Chowfla, GMAC president and CEO.

Most US companies (55%) either plan to hire (28%) or are open to hiring (27%) an international candidate in 2017 — up from 49% that had such plans last year. Globally, 86% of companies plan to hire recent MBA graduates this year, up from 79% that hired them in 2016. Demand for these MBA graduates is strongest in the United States and Asia-Pacific, where 9 in 10 companies plan to hire these candidates.

Moreover, nearly 3 in 4 responding start-ups (74%) plan to hire MBAs in 2017, up from 52 percent of these companies that hired MBAs last year.

Some additional key findings include:

  • A greater percentage of employers plan to hire business master’s graduates in 2017.
The largest increase in hiring demand compared with 2016 is seen in the share of companies that plan to hire Master in Management graduates; globally, 59% plan to hire recent Master in Management graduates, up nine percentage points from last year. Hiring demand for Master of Accounting and Master of Finance and graduates is projected to hold steady in 2017, with 42% of employers and 48% of employers reporting plans to hire them, respectively.

  • More than half of employers (52%) report they will increase starting salaries for new MBA hires in 2017 at or above the inflation rate.
A majority of European and US companies (57% and 51%, respectively) will maintain 2016 salary rates for new MBA hires in 2017. The projected median base starting salary for recent MBA graduates in the US in 2017 is US$110,000, up from a median of US$105,000 in 2016. This represents an 83% premium over recent bachelor’s-degree holders in the US, who can expect to receive a median starting salary of US$60,000 in 2017.

  • Communication skills rank highest among the skills employers consider most important.
Four of the top five skills employers seek in new hires include oral and written communication, listening skills, and presentation skills. Teamwork skills such as adaptability, valuing others’ opinions, ability to follow a leader, and cross-cultural sensitivity were among the top 10 most sought-after skills for new graduate business hires.

  • Employers more likely to offer internship opportunities to MBA students.
Sixty-five percent of employers globally and 74% of US employers plan to offer internships to MBA students in 2017. Just 27% of employers globally expect to offer internships to business master’s students this year.

GMAC conducted the 16th annual Corporate Recruiters Survey in February and March 2017 together with survey partners EFMD and MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance (MBA CSEA), in association with 97 participating graduate business schools. Survey findings are based on responses from 959 employers representing more than 628 companies in 51 countries worldwide. Two additional organisations, CEMS and RelishMBA, assisted with recruitment of survey participants.

Findings from the 2017 Corporate Recruiters Survey highlight the hiring intentions of companies and the skills sought from new hires. These findings provide business school graduates with insights into the labor market and provide companies with a tool to benchmark their plans against other organisations and industries.

To download GMAC’s 2017 Corporate Recruiters Survey Report and an overview of the survey methodology, visit: gmac.com/corporaterecruiters or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

IAE Aix-Marseille GSM to Host the International Teachers Programme© (ITP)

Making Good Teaching Great

INTERNATIONAL TEACHERS PROGRAMME 2017 and 2018

Logo IAE nouveau 2014 MDThe International Teachers Programme© (ITP), supported by EFMD, is an intensive faculty development programme dedicated to helping business educators develop suitable skills and capabilities to be successful in their careers. The ITP programme is organised by the International Schools of Business Management (ISBM), a group of twelve leading business schools located in Europe, North America, and Asia. The 2017 & 2018 programmes will be run by the Aix-Marseille Graduate School of Management-IAE in two locations: Aix-en-Provence (France) and Collbató, Barcelona (Spain)logo itp.

The ITP has served over 1,500 high-calibre faculty and educators from many countries since it started more than 50 years ago. During this period, the programme has rotated between ISBM schools:

  •     IAE Aix-Marseille Graduate School of Management, FR
  •     CEIBS - China Europe International Business School, CN           
  •     HEC School of Management, FR
  •     IMD, CH
  •     INSEAD Business School, FR
  •     Kellogg School of Management, US
  •     London Business School, UK
  •     Alliance Manchester Business School, UK
  •     New York University, Stern School of Business, US
  •     SDA Bocconi School of Management, IT
  •     Stockholm School of Economics, SEglobe 2017
The International Teachers Programme© is beneficial for mid-career faculty who teach business and management at any level: Bachelor, Master, MBA, Executive Education, Ph.D. and faculty development professionals. It is ideal for participants with some prior teaching experience who care about real excellence in teaching, who are at career inflection points and have the time and interest in turning a greater share of their attention to the further development of their teaching, or who have achieved competence in teaching one kind of audience and would like to extend their skills to other audiences.

“In the 2017 edition, ITP has welcomed 30 participants from 19 business schools from 14 different countries. Beyond the business schools of the ISBM consortium, business schools like Aalto, Kingston, Vlerick, RBS, WU Vienna, Pontificia Catolica Peru, UT Syndney or Durham are some examples.”

Carolina Serrano-Archimi, ITP Programme Director

"I owe my professional progress to ITP. As a young teacher in Assam, India, I attended the programme in 1982 and it changed my life. The curriculum transformed everything I thought I knew about management education. ITP introduced me to new pedagogical tools and strategies, and it helped me see deeper connections between my teaching and research. Through the ITP, I also gained greater confidence in the classroom. ITP challenged and inspired me to explore my potential, even as I learned how to help others discover their potential. This is a wonderful programme for anyone who aspires to create and share knowledge with impact."

Dipak C. Jain, Dean, Sasin Business School, Thailand

“In 1958 Harvard Business School launched the International Teachers Programme©. In 1969 a decisive step was taken by inviting several European management schools to join them in the further development and management of the ITP. In 1977 a consortium of business schools formed the non-profit organisation ISBM (International Schools of Business). Today ITP, its flagship initiative, is managed on a two-year rotation by one of the ISBM schools. Every new edition of the programme takes its starting point in previous programmes, while also ensuring continuous updating of the content and recognition of emerging global trends and best practice in business and in education.
More than a thousand ITP participants have benefited from the experience of this programme. Their feedback and subsequent career development make it clear that the ITP experience not only enhanced their teaching, but also provided specific, actionable tools for overall professional growth and gave them a strong global network of colleagues.
It is a pleasure for ISBM to offer you a similar opportunity in 2018.”
Pär Mårtensson, Chairman of the ISBM Board of Directors

You can find the brochure and more info via this web link. Please send any queries or questions you might have to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Masters Degree Not a Substitute for an MBA

2017 gmac prospective students webNew 2017 GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report shows many candidates with a prior business master’s degree are considering an MBA.

Three in 4 prospective graduate business school candidates who hold a prior master’s degree are considering enrolling in MBA programs, according to new research from the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC).

The MBA remains the predominant program format considered by candidates with both prior business master’s degrees (61%) and non-business master’s degrees (86%).

“These findings demonstrate that a business master’s degree is not necessarily the end of graduates’ business education,” said Sangeet Chowfla, president and CEO of GMAC. “For many, their business master’s degree is a stepping stone to continued professional development that may include an MBA down the road, in either a full-time or part-time format.”

The findings of the mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report show that globally 22% of prospective business school candidates have a prior master’s degree, with considerable regional variation. While 2 in 5 European candidates have a prior master’s-level credential, the same is true of just 14% of US candidates.

Other key findings include:

Demand for Business Master’s Programs Continues to Grow

Fueled by growing candidate demand, non-MBA business master’s programs continue to proliferate. Globally, the percentage of candidates considering only business master’s degrees has increased from 15% in 2009 to 23% in 2016.

Non-MBA programs and MBA programs attract distinct candidate pools seeking different outcomes. Candidates considering non-MBA business master’s programs skew younger and the majority have little to no prior work experience and are more interested in developing their technical skills. MBA candidates are typically older, have more years of work experience, and are more interested in developing their managerial and leadership skills.

International Study Demand Remains Strong

Nearly 3 in 5 prospective business school students (59%) intend to apply to programs outside their country of residence, up from 44% in 2009. Most candidates seek study opportunities outside their country of citizenship to receive a higher-quality education, to increase their chance of securing international employment, and to expand their international connections.

US Remains Most Preferred Study Destination Though Candidate Preferences Are Shifting

Consistent with past research, more than 9 in 10 US candidates prefer to study domestically (96%). Globally, among full-time MBA candidates looking to study outside their country of citizenship, 58% prefer to study in the US, down from 61% in 2009. Since 2009, there has been an increase in MBA candidates preferring to study in Canada (7% in 2016, up from 4% in 2009).

There has been a similar shift in preferred study destinations among non-US candidates interested in business master’s programs. In 2016, 47% of non-US prospective students interested in business master’s programs expressed a preference for study in the US, down from 57% in 2009. Over time, a greater share of these candidates have shown interest in applying to programs in Western Europe (34% in 2016 vs. 30% in 2009), Canada (7% in 2016 vs. 4% in 2009), and East and Southeast Asia (7% in 2016 vs. 4% in 2009).

Recent Immigration Policy Changes Having Impact on International Study Choices

Recent shifts in immigration policies may impact candidates’ study destination preferences in 2017. Anticipated changes in US immigration policies and last year’s Brexit vote in the United Kingdom may make it more difficult for non-citizens to obtain student visas to study in those countries or to obtain work visas after graduation to seek employment, one of the main reasons for studying in those countries.

In the aftermath of the US presidential election results, the percentage of non-US citizen mba.com registrants who say they are now less likely to study in the US has grown from 35% in November 2016 to 43% in April 2017.

Early indications are that the British Brexit vote to leave the European Union may negatively impact international candidate demand to apply to U.K. business schools. In December 2016, among nearly 1,300 non-UK GMAT test takers surveyed about the Brexit vote, 45% indicated that the Brexit vote has made them less likely to study in the UK.

Education Costs and Financing Continue to Weigh Heavily on Candidates’ Minds

The two most important financial aspects that candidates evaluate when deciding where to apply are total tuition costs and scholarship availability. Compared with 2009, candidates, on average, expect to cover a greater share of the cost of their education with grants, fellowships, and scholarships and a smaller share with parental support, loans, and employer assistance.

Analysis in the 2017 mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report is based on survey responses provided by 11,617 individuals who registered on mba.com between February and December 2016. To download the full report visit: gmac.com/prospectivestudents. For supporting graphics, visit the GMAC News Center.

From GMAC press release. Please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

Gender Equality: We Still Don’t Practise What We Preach

Discussion light

Business schools have long played a substantial role in shaping how the wider world tackles issues such as equality, diversity, inclusion and meritocracy. It isn’t unduly immodest to suggest many organisations look to us for at least some measure of guidance. We have a duty to research these problems, report our findings and help make a positive difference.

Prof. Jo Duberley and prof. Laurie Cohen provide some qualitative context to the raft of statistical evidence that shows women’s representation in the upper echelons of higher education, while exhibiting signs of piecemeal improvement here and there, remains conspicuously poor. The two scholars found evidence of various biases in the course of a groundbreaking new study, which was conducted at a number of research-intensive universities in the UK and Europe. The most common assumptions and prejudices they uncovered included:

  • Women aren’t viewed as men’s intellectual equals
  • Women are railroaded into pastoral roles
  • Women are teachers rather than researchers
  • Women’s number-one priority is – or should be – family
  • Women have to achieve “respectable femininity”
This being so, how can business schools sincerely expect other organisations to look to them for guidance? Should they not put their own houses in order before they can hope to be taken seriously when they try to tell everyone else how to run theirs?

Prof. Duberley, a Professor of Organisation Studies at Birmingham Business School, and prof. Cohen, a Professor of Work and Organisation at Nottingham University Business School, stress that time alone will not eradicate these failings. Moreover, they warn that business schools’ reputations, credibility and broader value to stakeholders could be significantly diminished unless such shortcomings are finally and effectively addressed.

Their full blog entry is available for download here. Anyone requiring further information or wishing to discuss the findings and their implications in more detail is invited to contact the authors at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

You might be also interest in the recent report, suppoerted by EFMD & EQUAL, on the gender gap in European business school faculties and what leaders need to do to close it.

Maximise Your Impact – How Academics Can Communicate Knowledge Through Traditional and Digital Media

MaximizeYourImpact3DAcademics spend lots of time writing, analysing data and collaborating with colleagues on research. Once the research is finished comes the fork in the road with the following two options:
  1. Have a glass of wine with colleagues and toast the success of the research and the fact that it was well received by a small group of academics
  2. Realise that this is only a first step. Now, its time to make the effort to communicate and dare I say the evil “m” word – market – it to external audiences
Many academics say the following:
  • I don’t have time
  • This won’t help me get tenure
  • I could come across as too self-promoting
  • Journalists are going to take my work out of context
  • Social media is not for serious research - it is for communicating the trivialities of life
An alternative mindset is:
  • Communicating to the public via traditional and digital media is a means of connecting me to different audiences.
  • This is a way for me to help the school gain visibility among key stakeholder groups like alumni, current students, prospective students, board members and others. What an opportunity to be an ideal “citizen” for my school!
  • I can benefit too! Maybe communicating to external audiences will lead to a new book opportunity, speaking engagements and/or consulting assignments.
  • I am in a better position to secure future research funding because of the impact generated from building up a thought leadership platform.
  • This is a terrific opportunity to share my knowledge outside of the walls of academia and thus benefit society.
  • What a great way for learning! 
The contrast between these two mindsets is quite stark. Some are in the first category and just have no interest in thinking otherwise. Others are in the second category, but just don’t feel comfortable with communicating to external audiences through traditional and digital media, but are keen to learn. 
 
The book Maximise Your Impact – How Academics Can Communicate Knowledge Through Traditional and Digital Media helps academics with the following: 
  1. Thinking through the big picture
  2. Generating impact through the traditional media
  3. Generating impact by creating content on owned platforms
  4. Generating impact using social media
The book is written by Kevin Anselmo, founder of Experiential Communications and a former PR professional for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and IMD in Switzerland.  The book is based on his experiences working with academics over the past 10 years in different contexts and countries as well as the insights from journalists, media-savvy academics and other expert communicators, many of whom come from the business education space.
 
In addition to academics, the book will also benefit communicators looking to train their colleagues as well as leadership looking to generate buy-in from their colleagues on the importance of external communications.
 
More information, including access to the free Blogging Strategy Guide for Academics is at the following link.

Challenges Women Face in the Business School Application Journey

2017 gmac white paper what women want webGlobally, women represent a greater share of the applicant pool than men in many of the business master’s programs, such as marketing, accounting and management. Women, however, are still underrepresented in MBA classrooms in the United States and around the world. What Women Want: A Blueprint for Change in Business Education is a new white paper from the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) that identifies drivers of this continued lack of gender parity in MBA programs.

The paper explores the biggest challenges women face in the business school application process and the differences between men and women in their motivations to pursue graduate business degrees.

The key findings are:

Motivations and Approaches to the Application Journey Differ by World Regions

Women in Western countries differ in their motivations and approaches to the application journey from women in emerging economies like China and India, and the motivational profiles of Western women differ noticeably from their male counterparts. In India and China, women’s motivations and application behaviors more closely resemble those of male applicants from these countries.

Women Plan Earlier and Are More Outcomes Focused

Women are more likely than men to begin considering graduate management education as undergraduates. Overall, women are more pragmatic and outcomes-focused in their approach to pursuing graduate business education. They are more likely than men to apply to a specific school because it offers flexible program formats and its graduates get better job opportunities. Especially in Western countries, women are more likely than men to be motivated by the desire to advance more quickly and earn more money.

Funding Is a Significant Barrier

Globally, 29 percent of female survey respondents cited financial issues as the key reason they had not yet accepted their admissions offer to graduate business school. Seeking scholarships and financial aid were top of mind. Men, on the other hand (33%), cited that they were waiting for an offer from additional schools as their reason for delaying acceptance. The greatest gender difference on this issue was seen in the U.S. More than a third (38%) of female survey respondents cited financial reasons as their number one reason for not yet accepting their admissions offer compared with 20 percent of male respondents. Yet, obtaining funds to pay for schools is a bigger challenge for men than for women in both India (8% Indian women vs. 14% Indian men) and China (9% Chinese women vs. 11% Chinese men).

MBA Is Still Relevant to Women Despite Higher Numbers Obtaining Non-MBA Business Master’s Degrees

Women are already achieving parity (52%) in master’s programs such as Master of Marketing, Master of Accounting, and Master in Management, and the number of these programs has grown exponentially in recent years. The share of women in MBA classrooms, however, has consistently remained well below parity with men at 37%. Despite greater shares of women choosing non-MBA master’s programs over MBA programs, the data show that women hold the MBA degree in higher regard than men, and view the degree as a passport to wider career advancement.

To download the GMAC white paper, What Women Want: A Blueprint for Change in Business Education, visit: http://www.gmac.com/womeninbusinessschool or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition 2016 Supported by EFMD: Results

ISB Ivey competition 2016The Centre for Learning and Management Practice (previously known as the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Case Development) at the Indian School of Business and Ivey Business School, Western University, Ontario, Canada announce the results of the ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition 2016. The annual competition identifies and publishes the best India-centric business cases from around the world.

The Centre for Learning and Management Practice at the Indian School of Business (ISB), hosts this event in partnership with Ivey Business School, Western University. The event is supported by Ivey Publishing and EFMD, with Amazon and Times Center-for-Learning Ltd. as Category Sponsors. Learn more here

RESULTS

OVERALL WINNER – 1st PLACE (Award of $ 4000.00)

Good Company or Good Stock – Investor's Dilemma
  • Pitabas Mohanty, XLRI, Jamshedpur
  • Supriti Mishra, International Management Institute, Bhubaneswar
OVERALL WINNER – 2nd PLACE (Award of $ 3000.00)

Barefoot College of Tilonia: Lighting Up Rural Lives in Under Developed Countries
  • Sunita Mehta, Hyderabad Business School, GITAM University
  • Surya Kant Sharma, XLRI, Jamshedpur
  • Radhika Ramanchi, Hyderabad Business School, GITAM University
WINNER – MARKETING CATEGORY (Award of $ 2000.00, sponsored by Amazon)

The Vanca: Reworking Digital Marketing Strategy
  • Jones Mathew, Jaipuria Institute of Management, Noida
  • Banasree Dey, Jaipuria Institute of Management, Noida
WINNER – ENTREPRENEURSHIP CATEGORY (Award of $ 2000.00, sponsored by ET Cases)

Unicommerce: The Exit Decision
  • Nilesh Gupta, Indian Institute of Management, Tiruchirappalli
  • Shantam Shukla, Varroc Group
To discover the Honourable Mentions, please go here.

Starting a Business is Now One of the Top Reasons to Take an MBA

Tomorrows MBA 2016Starting a business has become one of the top five motivations to study an MBA, reveals the 2016 edition of the Tomorrow’s MBA study by CarringtonCrisp, supported by EFMD.

The study, conducted amongst 1,000 MBA applicants worldwide, found that almost one in five (20%) were considering an MBA in order to start their own business. Entrepreneurship was rated as the fifth most valuable piece of content in an MBA degree, up from 10th in the previous year’s study.

Amongst those considering a specialist MBA, entrepreneurship is now in the top four most popular choices (10%), along with IT (10%), international management (11%) and finance (15%).

The study’s other key findings include:

·       More women (42%) responded to the survey than ever before – an indication in line with other industry studies that efforts by business schools to attract more female students are working.

·       However, male and female applicants differed on a number of elements when considering an MBA. For MBA course content, ‘leadership’ is more popular with men (40%) than women (29%). Conversely, 16% of women value ‘ethics’ as important course content compared to only 5% of men.

·       26% of respondents prefer a blended or online MBA.

·       Career planning and job searching is vital, with almost three quarters (72%) wanting to know that it is integrated into the student experience.

·       Some elements of MBA programmes seen by many schools as important were not highly valued by MBA applicants – including varied electives (8%), small class sizes (9%) and international study tours (11%).  For course content, corporate social responsibility was seen as most valuable by only 6% of respondents.

·       Google (38%) and LinkedIn (24%) were seen as the most important digital channels for deciding when to study. The Financial Times was comfortably the most important ranking (37%), followed by Forbes (27%) and Business Week (25%).

Entrepreneurship has been a growing trend for a number of years and is now firmly a key motivation for a lot of people to embark on an MBA. It presents an opportunity to those schools that are able to market their entrepreneurial expertise, but it also poses some interesting challenges.

Andrew Crisp, author of the report comments: “Schools need to consider if entrepreneurship is taught in its own right or integrated throughout a degree programme. They also should look at the sometimes differing needs of entrepreneurs and those students looking for more corporate roles. From an external perspective, it will be interesting to see what impact an increased number of graduates starting their own businesses will have on MBA rankings, where increases in post graduate salaries play an important part.”

The good news from the study is the indication that more women are interested in an MBA. Women represented 42% of respondents – since the study started in 2009 the percentage of female respondents had not risen above 38% until this year and has been as low as 26%. As with an increased focus on entrepreneurship, the successful schools are going to be the ones that are smart about marketing to both male and female applicants and then meeting their study needs where they do differ.

Google and LinkedIn were by far and away the most popular digital tools for applicants and their increased prominence provides a wonderful opportunity to business schools to segment and carefully target their marketing and recruitment efforts. Despite the advances in technology however, human contact remains key in deciding if the applicant and school are compatible. The most impactful marketing for schools is to combine human contact and technology – with one to one meetings with school staff (37%) and school website (39%) seen as having the biggest impact.

As well as a number of newer trends, the study reinforces certain factors that are ever present for MBA applicants when choosing a business school. A school’s academic reputation is the most important factor for both men (39%) and women (40%). Along with teaching quality, this has consistently been one of the most important elements since the study began.

Andrew Crisp concludes: “Since the financial crisis in 2009, there have been reports of the demise of the MBA. Our study shows that it is certainly not dead, but undergoing significant change. Competition is growing around the world, there are demands for different styles of delivery and importantly, students are ever more focused on their future career when judging value for money, with a growing number thinking that career may mean starting their own business.”

Please visit CarringtonCrisp's BusinessSchool.guru website to learn more or contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for press.

The Entrepreneurial Society: Global Peter Drucker Forum 2016

Drucker16

In recent years, EFMD has developed a close and rewarding partnership with the Global Peter Drucker Forum that is annually held in Vienna, Austria, Peter Drucker's birthplace.

This year's Forum will deal with a major transformation that Drucker predicted in his 1985 book Innovation and Entrepreneurship – the emergence of a society in which innovation and entrepreneurship are normal, steady and continuous. The Global Focus article "Building The New Entrepreneurial Society" outlines the scope of the conference.

As the Forum’s strategic partner, EFMD can provide our members with a 10% reduced conference fee. Register here.

The conference program can be accessed via this link.

EFMD and Cisco have jointly organised the session Adaptive Talent Markets - Channelling the Entrepreneurial Talent in which insights from the Special Interest Group (SIG) on the subject will be presented.

The 2016 roster of leading thinkers and practitioners participating in the Forum includes:
  • Clayton Christensen, Harvard Business School
  • Philip Kotler, Kellog Graduate School of Management
  • Sara Armbruster, VP, Steelcase
  • Tim Brown, CEO, IDEO
  • Mariana Mazzucato, Sussex University
  • Sally Osberg, CEO, Skoll Foundation
  • Rita Gunther McGrath, Columbia
  • Herminia Ibarra, INSEAD
  • Rajeev Vasudeva, CEO, Egon Zehnder
  • Gary Hamel, London Business School
  • Maelle Gavet, COO Priceline Group
  • Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford Business School
  • Lisa Hershman, CEO DeNovo Group, Vice Chair Scrum Alliance
  • Tawfik Jelassi, IMD
  • Gianpaolo Barozzi, Senior Director Cisco
  • Gisbert Rühl, CEO, Klöckner & Co SE
For the complete speaker’s list, please go here.
 

Drucker quote Abstract color

EFMD Awards EPAS Accreditation to Four New Programmes

EPAS 2016 JuneWe are happy to announce that the EPAS Accreditation Board has recently awarded the EPAS accreditation to three Institutions from Canada, Estonia and United Kingdom. We are delighted to welcome two new countries, Canada and Estonia, to the EPAS pool!
 
Four new programmes from three institutions have been recently recognised by EPAS quality label:

Faculty of Management, Laurentian University, Canada
- Bachelor of Commerce in Sports Administration (Bcom-SPAD)
- Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA on-campus only)

Dr. Stephen Havlovic, Dean of the Faculty of Management, Laurentian University, declared: “The international EPAS accreditation of our undergraduate business programs is a significant milestone for the Faculty of Management in light of our commitment to excellence in developing socially responsible leaders for the global business world. It’s a visible assurance of quality for current and future students, alumni and employers. As a bilingual university working in a very competitive higher education environment, it was important for us to be globally recognized for the excellence of our programs.”

Estonian Business School, Estonia
International BBA Programme 

Prof. Arno Almann, Rector of the Estonian Business School, said: “This is enormous recognition for EBS. It shows that the quality of our studies is up there with the very best business schools around the world. Such accreditation represents validation of what we’ve done to date in developing our study programmes and in ensuring the quality of our teaching and the competitiveness of the education we provide. It also boosts the reputation of both EBS specifically and Estonian higher education generally, and opens up new opportunities for our students and lecturers for working with recognised European universities.”

Faculty of Business, Oxford Brookes University, UK
MBA Programme

“As one of the original recipients of EPAS accreditation, the Faculty of Business at Oxford Brookes University is delighted to continue that tradition by receiving both a five-year re-accreditation for our undergraduate Bachelors in Business programme set as well as a 'first time' five year accreditation for our innovative, online Global MBA. We have always valued highly the rigour of the EPAS accreditation process in cross-checking our own quality assurance and delivery systems and helping us to achieve our aspiration of providing an outstanding student experience at all levels of study. But in addition to that rigour, we also greatly welcomed the collegiality of the accreditation panel in working with us and their constructively critical approach, all of which of course is only made possible by the hugely supportive EFMD administrative team,” said Mr. Chris Blackburn, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Dean of the Faculty of Business, Oxford Brookes University.


Prof. David Asch, Associate Director, Quality Services & EPAS Director, commented: “We are delighted to welcome three new Institutions into the community of EPAS accredited programmes, adding two new countries, Canada and Estonia, to the pool of EPAS accredited programmes. The programme accreditation from EFMD is one of the most demanding yet effective ways to certify the quality of a programme in the field of business and management. We would like to warmly congratulate all three schools for the tremendous work they put into the development of their programmes and for the completion of the accreditation process.”

EPAS was launched in 2005 and has had a considerable impact on the quality of business schools programmes all over the world. With the accreditation of those 4 new programmes, EPAS  adds 2 new countries, Canada and Estonia, to its portfolio. As of June 2016, 102 programmes from 74 Institutions across 35 countries have been labelled EPAS. 

The list of re-accredited programmes is available here.

For more information on EPAS visit www.efmd.org/epas

ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition 2016 supported by EFMD

ISB Ivey competition 2016The Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Case Development at the Indian School of Business and the Ivey Business School, Western University, Canada announce the ISB-Ivey Global Case Competition 2016. The annual competition identifies and publishes the best India-centric business cases from around the world. The event is supported by Ivey Publishing, Amazon, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and EFMD.

Launched in 2010, the competition has rapidly gained prominence in India and abroad and is widely considered a valuable source for cases by Business Schools around the world. The competition generates a growing number of submissions and published cases each year, facilitating its goal of building a repository of a high-quality, internationally benchmarked cases about Indian businesses.

A panel of internationally acclaimed subject experts judge shortlisted cases in a double-blind review process and provides written feedback on each case. The top cases from this competition are marketed and distributed to a global audience of business schools by Ivey Publishing — the largest source of current Asian and Indian business cases in the world.

The deadline for submitting the "Participation Form" is 29 February 2016 and more submission details, categories, criteria and deadlines can be found on the case competition website.

EFMD Call for Participation in the 2016 GMAC Corporate Recruiters Survey

 2016 corporate recruiters survey

EFMD and GMAC are once again cooperating to carry out the Corporate Recruiters Survey (CRS). Since 2001, CRS data has provided a picture of the current employment landscape, gauged employer demand for MBA and master-level business graduates, and offered valuable insights into employer needs and trends across industries and world regions.

The survey is conducted by GMAC in partnership with EFMD and the MBA Career Services & Employer Association (MBACSEA).Screen Shot 2015 12 08 at 12.35.13

For the 2016 edition, there are two easy ways to participate:

- Option 1: You provide GMAC with the list of employers that recruit and hire students from your business school, and GMAC takes care of the rest.
- Option 2: You administer the survey directly to the employers that recruit and hire students from your business school using a unique URL that GMAC provides.

Participating schools receive exclusive access to the following:

- Interactive Data Report. A free online tool that lets survey participants examine findings in greater depth and conduct customized data searches by numerous variables including propensity and magnitude of hiring overall and by industry and company size, internship data, and salary data.
- Customized Benchmark Report Tool. This free online service gives participants the power to instantly generate benchmark reports for peer programs of their choosing.

The survey launches on February 10, 2016. Sign up your school to participate anytime from now until January 31, 2016 to be sure your school hears from the employers that recruit your students about their hiring projections and the skills they seek in business grads.

For more information, please visit a special webpage.

CEIBS Acquires Lorange Institute of Business Zurich

CEIBS logoGuest post by Dr. Peter Lorange, Honorary President, Lorange Institute of Business Zurich, A Member of CEIBS Group

CEIBS, the China Europe International Business School, took over the Lorange Institute of Business Zurich, effective October 2015.

CEIBS was established in 1994 under an agreement between the Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Co-operation (MOFTEC, now The Ministry of Commerce) and the European Commission. The school has had a very successful development, and is today considered by many to be not only a top school in China but also one of the leading business school in Asia. CEIBS is now “re-entering” Europe through the acquisition – via the Friends of CEIBS Foundation – of the Lorange Institute of Business Zurich. Lately, we have seen important acquisitions by Chinese companies or the Chinese government all around of the world, including in Europe. The development of a base for CEIBS in Switzerland, thus, comes as a natural consequence of this added Chinese visibility in Europe.

For CEIBS the choice of Switzerland was important, as the country is situated in the center of Europe, with a neutral status vis-à-vis the major European countries, and with a high attractiveness ranking. And, selecting the Lorange Institute was equally natural for CEIBS. The fact that the Lorange Institute has no permanent faculty, but relies exclusively on drawing on faculty from other academic institutions, was seen as attractive to CEIBS as this ensures that there will be no major issues of cross-cultural integration of faculty.

The Lorange Institute is largely expected to maintain its present modus operandi, including continuing to offer its Masters programmes (E-MBA, E-MSc/ and its tailored corporate programmes). In addition, there are four new focal points for the Lorange Institute:

  • Many companies in Europe have been acquired by the Chinese organisations. This has risen a need for training of Chinese executives being assigned to these acquisitions. The new entity aims at providing relevant executive education offerings to this customer segment.
  • Exchanges for EMBA programme participants. Many of these Master students from CEIBS shall come to the Lorange Institute for several weeks and attend specific modules. Similarly, Master students from Lorange Institute shall be attending learning activities at CEIBS. The purpose: improved focus on the cross-cultural aspects of internationalisation.
  • Prepare European executives for China. Many European businesses see the large, fast-growing Chinese market as attractive, perhaps particularly now with a shift towards consumerism and away from classical manufacturing in China. However, the European executives may not be all that well prepared for doing business in China. The new entity is aiming to address this market.
  • Study trips in Switzerland for Chinese executives. There is often much to learn when it comes to management practices of Swiss companies, in particular when it comes to how these firms focus on rapid implementation of innovations. This will be one area of focus during study trips that will be arranged for Chinese executives.
A final issue: it is the intention of the acquirer, CEIBS, to maintain the fundamental ways in which the Lorange Institute now operates. So, Dr. Philipp Boksberger, President and CEO, shall continue in this roLorange logole, with Dr. Yuan Ding, Dean at CEIBS, as the Executive Chairman. The basic modular structure of many of the offerings at the Lorange Institute shall remain; as will the heavy focus on outsourcing, modern pedagogy, and ability to act with speed and flexibility.

In conclusion, it is important to point out that the clear aim of this deal is for dominant Chinese practices - such as long-term time horizon, consensus management, etc. - to be shared with European audiences, where there is already a genuine interest. Similarly, CEIBS is interested in drawing on several of the innovative business school practices put to work at the Lorange Institute. Dr. Peter Lorange shall remain involved in the new entity, and shall play a role when it comes to this, and as Honorary President.

EFMD is Delighted to Announce the Winners of the 2014 EFMD Case Writing Competition

CaseWriting-Award ecch

Winners include IBS Hyderabad, IE Business School, IMD, Indian School of Business, INSEAD, Kellogg School of Management , L.N. Welingkar Institute of Management Development, Middlesex University Dubai, Richard Ivey School of Business, Rotterdam School of Management, Singapore Management University, University of Regina, University of Waterloo.

EFMD is delighted to announce the winners of the first phase of the 2014 EFMD Case Writing Competition. The quality of the case entries was again exceptionally high so we thank all of you who took part. The "Best of the Best" category is now being evaluated by The Case Centre and the results of the overall winner of the competition will be announced later in the year.

Corporate Social Responsibility: “WWF's Living Planet @ Work: Championed by HP”, written by Oana Branzei, Richard Ivey School of Business and Haiying Lin, University of Waterloo. This category is sponsored by Kedge Business School.

Entrepreneurship: “Jungle Beer: An Entrepreneur's Journey”, written by Christopher Dula and Kapil Tuli, both at Singapore Management University, SG.  This category is sponsored by EM Lyon.

Family Business: “J.M. Huber: A Family of Solutions”, written by Benoît Leleux, and Anne-Catrin Glemser, both at IMD, CH.

Finance and Banking: “Infineon Technologies: Time to Cash in Your Chips?” written by Denis Gromb and Joel Peressn, both at INSEAD, FR. This category is sponsored by Toulouse Business School – Groupe ESC Toulouse.

Supply Chain Management: “Vanderlande Industries: Parcel And Postal Predicaments”, written by Rene de Koster and Philip Lazar, Rotterdam School of Management, NL. This category is sponsored by Kedge Business School.

Emerging Global Chinese Competitors: “Yancoal: The Saskatchewan Potash Question”, written by George Peng, Paul J. Hill School of Business at University of Regina, CA and Paul Beamish, Richard Ivey School of Business, CA.

Euro-Mediterranean Managerial Practices and Issues: “Rosa Vaño And Castillo De Canena”, written by Rosario Silva and Custodia Cabanas, both at IE Business School, ES. This category is sponsored by Groupe Sup de Co Montpellier Business School.

African Business Cases: “Mobile Telecommunications: Two Entrepreneurs Enter Africa”, written by Benjamin Jones and Daniel Campbell, both at Kellogg School of Management, US. This category is sponsored by China Europe International Business School (CEIBS).

Indian Management Issues and Opportunities: “Mast Kalandar: Prioritizing Growth Opportunities”, written by Sunil Chopra and Sudhir Arni, Kellogg School of Management, US.

Responsible Leadership: “SEWA (A): Ela Bhatt”, written by Sonia Mehrotra, L.N. Welingkar Institute of Management Development and Research, IN and Oana Branzei, Richard Ivey School of Business, CA. This category is sponsored by University of San Diego - School of Business Administration.

Inclusive Business Models: “Gillette's "Shave India Movement": Razor Sharp against the Stubble?”, written by Christopher Dula, Srinivas Reddy and Adina Wong, all at Singapore Management University, SG. This category is sponsored by IMD.

Latin American Business Cases: “Chile's Concha y Toro: A Silver Bullet for the Global Market”, written by V. Namratha Prasad and Muralidhara G V, both at IBS HYDERABAD, IN.  This category is sponsored by Universidad Externado de Colombia.

MENA Business Cases: “The Booming GCC Retail Sector: Prospects for Online Fashion Retailers”, written by Muneeza Shoaib and Hameedah Sayani, both at Middlesex University Dubai, UAE.  This category is sponsored by HEC Paris in Qatar.

Bringing Technology to Market: “Moser Baer And OM&T -- Choosing A Strategic Partnership Mode”, written by Kannan Srikanth, Sonia Mehrotra, Priyank Arora and Geetika Shah, all at Indian School of Business, IN. This category is sponsored by ESMT.

We would like to warmly congratulate all of the winners and once again thank all of our sponsors for their continued support of the EFMD Case Writing Competition.

Transnational Higher Education: Insights on Joint Programmes and Student Mobility

TransnatHE JointRussiaJoint Programmes between Higher Education Institutions of the European Union and Russian Federation
Joint Programmes are complex forms of collaboration. This report, co-authored by Nadine Burquel, EFMD Director Business School Services,  provides examples and checklists for action on how to overcome  challenges including legal restrictions, recognition issues, financial or organisational constraints, linguistic or cultural issues.

The 162-page report  highlights the  tremendous efforts put into teaching and learning cooperation in EU and Russian institutions. Several hundreds of programmes are covered and findings are structured around seven key dimensions:
  • Institutional partnership composition — Looser to more strategic partnerships
  • Programme design and delivery– Fragmented to real jointness
  • Student mobility paths — Ad-hoc to structured mobility paths
  • Recognition of study abroad — None, partial to full recognition
  • Degree types — Single (Joint), Double, Certificate
  • Programme management — From individual to institutional integrated arrangement
  • Quality assurance — Internal and external arrangement
General findings include:
  • EU-Russian Joint Programmes focus primarily on Management, Economics and Engineering, Manufacturing & Construction and are for the majority at the Master level.
  • German and French universities dominate in EU-Russian partnerships, followed by Finland and the United Kingdom.
  • In Russia, most Joint Programmes are found in Moscow, followed by St-Petersburg and Siberia.
  • Different lengths of studies in the EU and Russia create recognition problems.
  • Mobility is mainly for Russian students who travel to Europe.
For further details, please consult the 162-page report: Joint Education Programmes between Higher Education Institutions of the European Union and Russian Federation. Chapter 8 is dedicated to challenges and best practices:
  • The strength of internationalisation in partner universities
  • The lack of partners’ clear motives
  • Linguistic, cultural and legal limitations
  • Developing and establishing robust partnerships
  • Decisions at the level of programme integration and jointness
  • Creating opportunities, building brand and reputation
  • Financial constraints to ensure joint programmes’ long term sustainability
TransnatHE studentsStudent Mobility and Internationalisation
The 261-page report “Social and Economic Conditions of Student Life in Europe” presents the findings of the 5th round of the EUROSTUDENT project to which 30 countries of the EHEA have contributed between 2012 and 2015. It is a collection of key indicators on the social dimension of higher education and functions to monitor progress in the implementation of the Bologna Process reforms.  The synopsis focuses on three main topic areas: Access to higher education and characteristics of students; Study conditions; and International student mobility and future plans.

Chapter 10 examines students’ international mobility (realised and planned), obstacles to enrolment abroad, organisation and funding of enrolment abroad, and the recognition of credits earned abroad. As an indicator of internationalisation at home, the extent to which students’ national study programmes are taught in foreign language is examined. Results here indicate that:
  • International student mobility rates vary greatly by country; between 5 % and 39 % of students in the cross-sectional samples.
  • Enrolment abroad tends to be the most frequently realised foreign study-related experience.
  • Access to international student mobility can be shown to be subject to social selectivity.
  • The most critical of the analysed obstacles to studying abroad is the (perceived) additional financial burden.
  • A separation from partner, children, and friends has turned out to be the second most critical obstacle.
  • A large degree of variation across countries can also be observed regarding the organisation, funding and recognition of foreign enrolment periods.
For the full details, please go here.

CEIBS to host the International Teachers Programme© (ITP)

CEIBS-ITPThe International Teachers Programme© (ITP) supported by EFMD, is an intensive faculty development programme dedicated to helping business educators develop suitable skills and capabilities to be successful in their careers. The ITP programme is organized by the International Schools of Business Management (ISBM), a group of thirteen leading business schools located in Asia, Europe, and North America. The 2015 & 2016 programmes will be hosted by the China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) at both its Shanghai and Beijing campuses.

The ITP has served over 1,500 high-caliber faculty and educators from many countries since it started more than 50 years ago. During this period, the programme has rotated between ISBM schools:

  •     CEIBS - China Europe International Business School, CN           
  •     HEC School of Management, FR
  •     IAE AIX Graduate School of Management, FR
  •     IMD, CH
  •     INSEAD Business School, FR
  •     Kellogg School of Management, US
  •     London Business School, UK
  •     Manchester Business School, UK
  •     New York University, Stern School of Business, US
  •     SDA Bocconi School of Management, IT
  •     Stockholm School of Economics, SE

I owe my professional progress to ITP. As a young teacher in Assam, India, I attended the program in 1982 and it changed my life. The curriculum transformed everything I thought I knew about management education. ITP introduced me to new pedagogical tools and strategies, and it helped me see deeper connections between my teaching and research. Through the program, I also gained greater confidence in the classroom. ITP challenged and inspired me to explore my potential, even as I learned how to help others discover their potential. This is a wonderful program for anyone who aspires to create and share knowledge with impact.
Dipak C. Jain, Dean, INSEAD

This will be the first time that the ITP has been offered outside a Western country. In addition to the many well-established qualities of the ITP, its location in China, the world's most dynamic economy, and at CEIBS, a globally top-ranked business school, adds a powerful and exciting dimension, while using most of the same international faculty as in previous programmes.

You can find more info via this web link. Please send any queries or questions you might have to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The International Teachers Program© is an intensive faculty-development program dedicated to helping business educators develop suitable skills and capabilities to be successful in their careers. This Programme is beneficial for junior and mid-career faculty who teach business and management at any level: Bachelor, Master, MBA, Executive Education, Ph.D. and faculty development professionals. It is ideal for participants with some prior teaching or coaching experience who are looking to take their capabilities to the next level. ITP has served over 1,500 high-caliber faculty and educators from many countries since it started more than 50 years ago.

2014 EFMD-Emerald Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards (Part Two)

emerald logoEFMD and Emerald Publishing announce with great pleasure the winners of the 2014 Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards. In this second listing of Winners and Highly efmd-newlogo2013-lr coloursCommended, we cover:

Leadership and Organisational Development, sponsored Leadership & Organization Development Journal

  • “Follow Me! Followership, Leadership and the Multigenerational Workforce”: Dr. Johnson, Winner from Nova Southeastern University
  • “Leadership, engagement, and workplace behaviors: The mediating role of psychological capital”: Dr. Robin, Highly Commended from The University of Melbourne

Management and Governance, sponsored by Management Decision

  • “Collaborative Resilience: The Multi-Level Structural of Organizational Kinship in Socioeconomic Collectives”: Dr. Randolph, Winner from University of Nevada Las Vegas

Human Resource Management, sponsored by Personnel Review

  • “Human Resource Management: Work-Family Reconciliation”: Dr. Glaveli, Joint winner from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
  • “The impact of HR differentiation on employees”: Dr. Marescaux, Joint winner from KU Leuven

Logistics and Supply Chain Management, sponsored by International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management

  • "The adaptation of Supply Chains to Climate Change": Dr. Kreie, Winner from Heriot-Watt University

Knowledge Management, sponsored by Journal of Knowledge Management

  • “The use of storytelling as transfer of knowledge”: Dr. Leung, Winner from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • “The hidden difference – Identity status, access of knowledge and the generation of new ideas”: Dr. Silberzahn, Highly Commended from IESE Business School

Health Care Management sponsored by Journal of Health Organisation and Management

  • “Health Systems Integration: Competing or Shared Mental Models?”: Dr. Evans, Winner from University of Toronto
  • "Bottom-up safety initiatives: a case study of falls preventon at a Portuguese hospital": Dr. Barbosa de Melo, Highly Commended from  Queen's University Belfast

Award-winning entries receive a cash prize of €1,500 and international recognition. Moreover, EFMD is particularly proud to see so may EFMD member institutions represented, the first six categories of the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards were covered in a first blog post and cover Educational leadership and strategy, Interdisciplinary accounting research, Marketing research, Information science, Hospitality management, as well as Operations and production management. You may also be interested in more details on the Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards or you may want to consult the archives of previous winners.

Reflections on the Future of Business Schools and Elephants

Guest post from Prof. Johan Roos, Dean and CEO of Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.

Johan Roos
will moderate the panel discussion "What’s Next for Management Education" during the 2015 EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General in Barcelona. Andrew Hill, Associate Editor and Management Editor, FT, and a group of distinguished panelists will reflect on what business schools do in different regions of the world in relation to the current world situation.

elephant building surreal pen ink drawing by vitogoni d5rnr84DURING the course of in 2013-2014, as the Dean of a Swedish business school I participated in three educational programs devoted to exploring and assessing the status of higher education and what university presidents, deans and senior-levels administrators can do to improve our future.  One conference was an 18-months-nine-weekend program offered by The Association of Swedish Higher Education. Another was a 1-weekend seminar at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education for experienced university presidents. The third was the week-long leadership in higher education program offered by the Oxford Academy for Education and Development. In reviewing these learning experiences as part of my preparation for the upcoming 2015 EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General, I had three insights that may help many of us strategize for 2015 and beyond.
   
Insight #1 – Higher Education today is like the parable of the 3 blind men and the elephant.
We all know the tale of the blind men who want to understand what an elephant is. One blind man feels the elephant’s leg and so thinks it is an animal that must look like a tree. The other blind man feels the tail and thinks an elephant is a thin and wispy animal. The third blind man feels the trunk and believes that elephants are like snakes.

In the same way, over the course of my three programs, I felt that I was in the company of blind men and women trying to figure out what higher education should look like in the future. Each of us had a very different sense of the ailments that are currently challenging us.

•    Some very thoughtful colleagues believed that the loss of professorial control over courses and curricula to centralized planners in their schools constituted a major blow to good teaching and rapport between students and faculty.
•    Others focused on how the growing demand for measurable student “outcomes” was pressuring them to abandon the teaching of thinking and analysis, for a focus only on vocational competence development.
•    Still others worried about the growing financial pressures on higher education, especially among state-owned schools that are facing budgetOpportunity cuts and pressure to reform their operations. My heart went out to several university leaders in African nations whose deepest concerns were finding clean water for their schools in parched countries, or staying safe from marauding terrorists 100 miles from their gates.

As I reflected on these problems, what became clear to me was that every one of us was sensing some type of elephant, though we interpreted it differently. We all felt problems looming ahead, even if each person was struggling with challenges that are local and on the plate directly in front of them. But to me, what was worse was that nearly everyone saw their challenges in a negative way, more like a crisis than an opportunity. There was a pall of fatalism dominating the soul of the gatherings, and it was disconcerting.
I am an optimist and I hope that I can inspire others to adopt my position that change is possible, that we can walk into the future with great ideas to guide our institutions to higher goals and serve the purpose of a better world.

Insight #2 – There is an elephant in the room—and it’s a good thing.
As for bringing insight #1 home to myself, I realized that when it comes to business education, we are looking at the proverbial elephant in the room that we don’t want to talk about but it is actually a great omen of change. Of course, we all know that business schools are in need of serious reconstructing, but I suggest it is now time to see opportunities that we have in front of us rather than denying the crisis.  We have remained ensconced in the same paradigms of thinking, teaching, and researching as we have done for more than fifty years, while the world is changing around us.

We are seemingly deaf to the outside global business world telling us that they require a new type of education for business students, yet we have the tools, minds and ability to develop many great new ideas. We have been blind to building new programs and curricula that take into account how the business world intersects technology, science, engineering and medicine, yet these are perhaps the most fascinating areas of growth for business schools. We act defensively about the pressure to find new ways to teach and learn, yet MOOCS could be our silver lining to an efficient, imaginative and responsible blended lifelong learning approach that could also create a renaissance of the classical high touch, high value tutorial system of education. In short, let’s look at the elephant in the room and see it as reminder to innovate rather than run away pretending it is not there.

changeInsight #3 – We need to make changes of an elephantine nature.
Three programs hardly form a pattern, but it was impossible for me not to see that the tasks in front of us are enormous. To keep my elephant metaphor, the problems we face require action of elephantine proportions, ranging from a complete overhaul in how we prepare students for higher education, to what types of curriculum and programs we offer them, to what relationship their business education has to do with working in the real world of business. These are all potentially large paradigm changes to tackle, but they will help us reinvigorate the ultimate purpose of higher education grounded in freedom of thought, integrity, quality, and responsibility.  Such reconstruction will take time, great effort, and patience, but it can be done.  I suggest that 2015 is a good year to start because 2014 is already gone.  Elephants or not, it is time to get to work.

EFMD Sign Strategic Partnership with AdjunctFinder.com

ajEFMD has entered into a strategic partnership with AdjunctFinder.com to deliver members access to a worldwide data base of Adjunct Faculty and provide a workforce planning tool for their existing Adjuncts.

Business education is changing with tighter budgets, casualised employment, increasing global competition and students demanding more experienced and diverse instructors. Business schools need simple, cost-effective ways to service student needs and deliver successful educational outcomes.

AdjunctFinder.com is the global, central clearing-house or ‘commons’ for business and business law related schools delivering quality Adjunct faculty to the front line. Adjuncts are full-time, part-time, retired or semi-retired academics or managers - people who want to share their knowledge and experience with the next generation. Adjuncts deliver face to face, intensively on-site and online; they work as sessional lecturers, tutors, executive educators, research supervisors, markers, guest speakers, mentors, coaches, advisory board members and study tour leaders.

The strategic partnership between AdjunctFinder.com and EFMD will enable our member schools to access local and global teaching staff and manage their current people in a personal school-branded site. Through their personal ‘My Adjuncts’ school site, school leaders and administrators can apply data – qualifications, teaching experience, business experience, disciplines, teaching modes, availability etc – to their staff allocation decision making.  adjunctfinderpic

Click here to visit the AdjunctFinder.com website.



“The EFMD AdjunctFinder.com strategic partnership brings global Adjunct Faculty recruitment to all members. The easily accessible, global data base of Adjuncts makes searching for new talent easy while providing a Workforce Planning tool to manage existing Adjuncts. We believe our partnership with AdjunctFinder.com will have enormous benefits for members and build stronger global bonds between our schools,” said Prof. Eric Cornuel, Director General and CEO of EFMD.

Exclusive Offer to EFMD Members

AdjunctFinder.com is offering a 20% discount to EFMD members subscribing before 1 September 2015. Such subscribers will also qualify for the ‘My Adjuncts’ premium service, to manage their existing Adjuncts in their personal school-branded site for no extra cost for one year from the date of joining.

If you would like to learn more about how this strategic partnership can benefit your school please contact Victoria O’Connor This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or John Toohey This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



If you have any other questions regarding how EFMD is supporting this partnership, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at EFMD.

Join a Graduway Webinar to Power Your Alumni Relations

Banner 3
Join a Graduway Webinar to Power Your Alumni Relations
The partnership with Graduway, a leading provider of alumni networking platforms offers exclusive value to EFMD member schools.

Earlier in the year we announced that EFMD ​had ​entered into a strategic partnership with Graduway, ​a leading provider of alumni networking platforms​ to business schools around the world. We are delighted to update you with the news that the partnership has been a great success with many EFMD schools taking advantage of the Graduway system at special negotiated rates.

Schools such as ​Coppead, UCLan, Stathmore, Canterbury Christ Church, St Gallen, ESMT, ALBA, Memorial Nwwfoundland, Northumbria Newcastle Business School, Solvay, Krannert School of Management at Purdue University and many more are now benefiting from more engaged alumni communities.

The strategic partnership between Graduway and EFMD will enable our member schools to improve their alumni relations by having access to their own branded alumni engagement platform which is fully integrated with social networks. Schools use the platform to engage past and present students, find lost alumni, enhance advancement opportunities as well as complete important accreditation requirements through our platform.

Click here to see the Graduway Video.

Graduway are running free to attend 20 minute webinars to learn more.

  • 6th November - 3.30pm Central European Time / 9.30am Eastern Standard Time
  • 11th November - 11am Central European Time
  • 13th November - 3.30pm Central European Time / 9.30am Eastern Standard Time

To join simply reply by email to Robert Curtis at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your preferred time and we will send through the login details.

The first 100 EFMD members get a 10% discount on the Graduway platform and pay no set up fees.

Graduway will also be speaking at the 2015 EFMD Conference for International and External Relations, PR, Marketing, Communication and Alumni Professionals that will be held in Vancouver from the 25-27 of March hosted by the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University. The conference theme is "Understanding, Identifying and Building a Distinctive Business School Brand" and there will also be a special Aumni evening.

If you have any other questions regarding how EFMD is supporting this partnership, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at EFMD.

Testimonials

  • ‘’We’ve been looking for some time for a state-of the-art online platform for our alumni, one that combines the need for a personalized approach with fresh design and the interactivity of social networking. At the same time it needed to be simple and easy to deploy and manage. Graduway ticked all the boxes.’’ Becky Ann Gilbert, Head of Development and Alumni Relations, ESMT, Germany.

  • ‘’The Graduway platform is truly cutting edge and will provide our alumni with easy access to their lifelong network of friends and business contacts they made during their time with us.’’ Rod Lohin, Executive Director, Rotman Alumni Network, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Canada.

  • ‘’Graduway will help us find our lost alumni and keep them engaged resulting in us having access to a talent pool for mentorship, brand ambassadors and donors in the future.’’ Carlos Carvalho, Director Alumni COPPEAD, COPPEAD de Administração / UFRJ, Brazil.

New in 2015: PMI Teaching Case Competition

PMI LogoPMI Academic Resources invites project management scholars and practitioners to participate in its inaugural teaching case competition, launching 2 January 2015.

Teaching with cases helps to create an energising atmosphere that inspires students to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. The challenge for faculty has been to find high-quality teaching cases in project management. This competition aspires to build a repository of high-quality teaching cases available for faculty to use in undergraduate and postgraduate project management programs.

The theme of this year’s competition is Project Management and Disaster Relief. The competition will be judged by a panel of expert case writers and project management scholars, with monetary prizes for the top three cases, as follows:

PMI case1st Prize: US$3,000
2nd Prize: US$2,000
3rd Prize: US$1,000

The top three finalists will be invited to PMI Global Congress 2015—North America, where the winners will be announced. The prize-winning cases will be published through PMI.

The early submission deadline is 1 April 2015.  Please click  for complete guidelines and submission details. You are also invited to check the FAQs or contact PMI for This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

You may also be interested in recent research from the Project Management Institute:

And there is more from the PMI Publications website.

The Future of Successful Business is a Combination of Profit and Purpose

CranfieldCCNew study finds the future of successful business is a combination of profit and purpose

88% of current CEOs and 90% of future leaders surveyed believe businesses should have a social purpose. However, only 19% of future leaders think businesses already have a clear social purpose, compared to 86% of CEOs. CEOs and future leaders hold different beliefs on the biggest barriers to businesses adopting a social purpose, with current leaders citing external factors such as government and regulation, while future leaders believe current management attitudes play a larger role.

These results are part of a new study published today by Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) – which manufactures, distributes and markets Coca-Cola products in Western Europe – in partnership with Cranfield’s Doughty Centre for Corporate Responsibility and The Financial Times’ FT Remark (FT).

The study, ‘Combining Profit and Purpose’ is based on the views of 50 CEOs and almost 150 MBA and MSc students and recent graduates across Europe. This interesting report has separate sections on:

  • Should business have a social purpose?
  • Does business now have a social purpose? If so, what interpretation of social business?
  • Wha is hindering companies’ adaoption of a social purpose?
  • What would encourage businesses to adopt a social purpose?
  • How should a business define its purpose?

For more information, please read the full report or you can also consult the Combining Profit and Purpose Infographic.

The New EFMD Global Focus Magazine 2014 is now Available

Global Focus-Issue3 2014

This latest issue of Global Focus begins with an article by EFMD's Michael Osbaldeston on how accreditation can, and is, helping business schools respond to many of the challenges and criticisms facing the sector.

You can read or download the full issue for free via the EFMD Library on Issuu or access the tablet versions via iTunes and Google Play.

In focus and Contents

Business School Impact Survey

The EFMD Excellence in Practice Awards (EIP): Call for Entries

EFMD/EURAM Research Leadership Programme, Cycle 5

The challenges facing business school accreditation: Business schools have been among the most successful higher education institutions of the last 50 years. Yet now they face many serious challenges that, as Michael Osbaldeston explains, have deep implications for accreditation bodies.

EFMD & Graduway partnering to raise standards in alumni relations

Embedding values: Mark Moody-Stuart examines the difficulties of ensuring that the right values are agreed, understood and truly embedded in a large multicultural business organisation.

The Jazz Age: Social intrapreneurs are rarely individual heroes but more like jazz musicians jamming in a group. But sometimes, say David Grayson, Melody McLaren and Heiko Spitzeck, they need even bigger groups – a fully orchestrated ‘big band’.

Smart Diploma

Enhancing talent development and talent acquisition: Amber Wigmore Alvarez and Boris Nowalski describe current changes to the way companies and business schools manage talent.

How being embedded in your region helps growth: Thomas Bieger explains how the University of St Gallen used the new Business School Impact Survey to consolidate and build on its local roots.

From EPAS to EQUIS and AACSB…and from AACSB to EPAS: Anne-Joëlle Philippart explains how the mix of EFMD and AACSB accreditation models helped achieve a rapid improvement of the quality assurance system at HEC-Liege.

Adjunct Finder.com: connecting part-time faculty and business schools.

The case for inspiration: Donald Marchand and Anna Moncef discuss the lessons to be learned from the Novartis SMS for Life initiative.

Making the most of the hiring process: The latest Corporate Recruiters Survey offers a positive MBA hiring landscape and highlights what is most important for employers in the process. Christophe Lejeune and Michelle Sparkman Renz report.

Solving the global talent equation: Mike Johnson offers some thoughts on the challenges facing business leaders tasked with managing our organisations today and tomorrow.

Reinvigorating the PhD: PhDs are increasingly under scrutiny for being ‘irrelevant’ and ‘lacking impact’. But given the right tools, Simon Linacre believes that they still have much to offer.

The new approach to growth and profitability that business schools need: Peter Lorange and Jimmi Rembiszewski argue that business schools must react more urgently to a new type of student.

Business school libraries – where next? Daniel Gunnarsson describes the major changes that technology has made possible in business school libraries. And speculates about other changes that are still to come.

Strategic leadership and new ways of working to drive organizational growth – the UniCredit approach: Andrew Rutsch explains how Italian banking group UniCredit turned to strategic leadership and new ways of working in a bid to drive organisational growth.

EFMD Upcoming Events

2015 EFMD Conference for International and External Relations, PR, Marketing, Communication and Alumni Professionals

Looking for more students? Recruit with Precision with the Graduate Management Admission Search Service

If you have any comments or questions on Global Focus or would like to propose story ideas please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rethinking the MBA for the Future

MBA 100daysGiselle Weybrecht has been posting one short idea a day as a brainstorming exercise towards creating more sustainable leaders.  It was exploring all aspects of the business school ranging from curriculum and research to partnership and campus activities. The 100 days were in the Summer 2014.

Now Giselle is posting 10 short summary points bringing together the main themes:

  • Stronger individuals: The future business school is about creating stronger individuals who have both a better understanding of the world around them, and how they fit within that world.
  • Engaging with the community: Future business schools will be a much more integral part of their surrounding community, engaging in a wide range of community activities. If you are looking for a tool to to determine the extent of a school’s impact upon its local environment, please do check out the EFMD Business School Impact Survey, BSIS.
  • Driving innovation: Business schools are made up of a constantly changing group of interdisciplinary students, faculty experts and outside partners with a wide range of experience which could be put to use to explore opportunities.
  • The bigger picture: The “business” degree itself will reflect more closely the realities of business today by putting a major focus on the bigger picture, those things that business impacts as well as those things that impact business.
  • Useful, relevant and up-to-date: The curriculum of the future will embed current sustainability topics throughout all classes.
  • Focus on education: Rather than move into creating shorter-faster programmes, business schools will focus on creating an environment that maximises learning and teaching opportunities.
  • Flexibility: Business schools of the future will be much more flexible in terms of the kinds of programmes, focus on disciplines, whilst focused on a particular part of a career, or available over a lifetime.
  • Accessibility: the business school of the future will attract a much wider range of individuals, eliminating the need for diversity officers or quotas.
  • For knowing key themes 9 and 10, please follow Giselle on Twitter.

If you are interested in more info, please do explore the 100 different ways to rethink and reimagine the MBA.  You are also warmly invited to join this discussion at the upcoming 2015 EFMD MBA Conference that is to be held on 8-10 March 2015 in Rome, Italy, kindly hosted by the LUISS School of Business and Management.

IESE & Barcelona is the New Location for the GBSN & EFMD Africa Conference

Africa Banner web2

NEW LOCATION: The 2014 Africa Conference has been moved from Ghana to IESE & Barcelona.

It is with great disappointment that EFMD, GBSN & GIMPA have to announce that the 2014 Africa Conference has been moved from Ghana to Barcelona, Spain due to the ongoing and tragic crisis surrounding the Ebola virus.

The President of Ghana issued a 3-month moratorium on international conferences and there are rising concerns among our member schools about the Ebola crisis, so the decision to move location had to be made.

Since the new venue for the conference will be Barcelona, Spain, we hope that our members that were not planning to travel to Ghana, but still have an interest in business education in Africa see this as an opportunity to participate in engaging discussions with a very international audience.  The conference program will keep a strong focus on Africa.

We warmly thank IESE Business School for stepping in to offer their facilities at such short notice and being so supportive of the network.

The conference will take place on the initially planned dates of 4th-5th November 2014, with the GBSN Members Meeting and EFMD Accreditation seminar on 3rd November 2014. Even though the conference location will change, the conference program will keep a strong focus on Africa with the same agenda and we look forward to engaging discussions with a very international audience.

Early Bird Registration has been extended through September 30th, and new hotel information will be posted to the website soon. Please check back to www.gbsn.org/africa2014 for more information.

We would like to thank all of our members for your understanding and continued support and look forward to warmly welcoming you to Spain. If you have any questions please contact  Page Buchanan, GBSN, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Griet Houbrechts, EFMD, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Hong Kong Baptist University School of Business - PhD Fellowship Scheme for 2015/16

HK fellowshipThe Hong Kong Baptist University, School of Business is currently accepting applications for the Hong Kong PhD Fellowship Scheme 2015/16. This scheme, established by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (RGC) in 2009, aims at attracting the best and brightest students from all over the world to pursue their PhD studies in Hong Kong. The scheme offers financial support of approximately US$116,000 to awardees.

Please do check the full details on how to apply,  here you will also find detailed information about research focus in the departments of Accountancy & Law; Finance & Decision Sciences; Economics; Management; and Marketing.

The Third Wave: The Future of Leadership Development

pivot logoToday’s world requires leaders who have more authenticity, better agility and a stronger sense of agency. This brilliant white paper provides a framework on how to prepare leaders for what is needed in this new world.

Authors Sullivan, Philpot and Meeks underline that the "Third Wave" approach means stepping out of your comfort zone, but their experience indicates that rewards tend to match the risks. Pivot Leadership is a strategic leadership boutique that partners with Fortune 500 executives to help them lead, innovate, and adapt to volatile markets and changing industries.

This white paper focuses on redefining leadership development around five key dimensions:

  • Ideology: Bringing the hard and soft sciences together, future leaders must be able to integrate both the hard and soft aspects of leadership.
  • Focus: From personality to purpose, in the sense of the strongly felt responsibility that a leader has for taking action even in the face of risk, conflict and uncertainty.
  • Participants: From clean fish to clean tanks, in terms of cultivating the system within which leadership is exercised: learning becomes embedded, operationalised and intertwined with change.
  • Technique: From application to immersion in the sense of extensive and intense exposure of leaders to the natural settings in which leadership is actually excercised.
  • Outcome: The three A’s: Agency, Authenticity and Agility, which means going beyond knowledge, skills and competencies.

Pivot coverImplications for Practice

Pivot Leadership experts focus on five critical design principles, each derived from the dimensions described above:

Ideology: Putting disruption in the foreground: By addressing competitive threats, changing customer needs, and how the business must reinvent itself, leaders will develop an integrated perspective on their business.

Focus: Discovering purpose: Leadership development should address a person’s intellectual and emotional capacity in an integrated way.

Participants: Bringing the ecosystem into the room: The best method for teaching “enterprise thinking” is to include customers, partners, and key stakeholders as part of the live learning experience.

Technique: Using immersion to stimulate visceral learning: The real work of a leadership development is to help participants figure out things for themselves.

Outcome: Developing agency, authenticity and agility: The output of leadership development should be about changing mindsets, the quality of dialogue leaders have, their sense of responsibility and their sense of purpose.

If you are interested in more details, this 15-page white paper can be downloaded for free from the Pivot Leadership website that has more information on other publications and their expertise.

Perhaps you are also interested in the EFMD Excellence in Practice "EiP" Awards. EIP recognise outstanding and impactful Learning & Development (L&D) partnerships in the domains of Leadership, Professional, Talent and Organisation Development. The L&D initiative described in the case can be deployed by an organisation either together with its in-house Learning & Development unit or with external L&D providers, such as a business school or executive education center. This Special Supplement of Global Focus features the winners and highly commended entries of the 2013 EFMD Excellence in Practice Awards and covers Group Danone & London Business School, ATOS & HEC Paris, Danske Bank Sweden & Stockholm School of Econimics, IFL, EDF & Toulouse School of Econimics and Galician Automotive Cluster & CEAGA's corporate university.

Scientific Advances in Developing Leaders for Today's Complex Environment

ashridgeYou are kindly invited to CRED3, the 3rd Ashridge Centre for Research in Executive Development Conference, that will take place at Ashridge in the UK on 11-13 December 2014.  The conference will bring together academics and practitioners to explore how research from the behavioural sciences can inform our understanding of the process and experience of learning, with the aim of improving the effectiveness of executive development in developing leaders who can prosper in today's complex environment.

This conference will address one of the developing needs and key priorities in the changing world of executive development. The business environment is growing ever more complex, and the demands placed on executives to deal with this complexity are growing in equal measure. This conference will explore how research in the behavioural sciences can inform our understanding of the process and experience of learning, to help improve the effectiveness of executive education in developing leaders who can prosper in today’s complex environment.

To this end, conceptual, empirical or practice based submissions are welcome on any of the following topics, or any others relevant to the theme of the conference:

  • Exploring the cognition behind learning to improve the way we teach
  • The neurological underpinnings and social processes of executive education
  • Exploiting the neuroplasticity of our brains to enhance our capacity to learn
  • Engaging motivation for reward to improve the effectiveness of learning
  • Applying an understanding of the biology of consumer behaviour to the classroom
  • Moving beyond competence development
  • Methods and processes to accelerate vertical development
  • The social psychology of the classroom experience
  • The impact of personality on learning and interaction in the classroom
  • Understanding the psychobiology and neurology of learning
  • Incorporating experiential learning into programmes and workplace learning
  • The collaborative nature of leadership and implications for development
  • Lessons business schools can learn from our complex and turbulent environment

Papers should include recommendations for implementation in practice. The deadline for the submission of full papers is 10th October 2014.  Please go here to download the full Call for Papers in pdf format - as well as latest news on keynote speakers.

The conference will interest HR and L&D practitioners, business school faculty and those involved in the design and delivery of executive education, as well as academics undertaking research in the application of the behavioural sciences to the development of leaders.  Please do consult the Ashridge website for full details.

Join Now for the 2014 EFMD ABS International Deans Programme (IDP7)

idp We would like to inform you that you now can register for the 7th edition of the EFMD-ABS International Deans' Programme (IDP).

This exceptional programme enables a group of up to 20 international deans to visit business schools in four countries. You will gain a unique overview of strategy, operations, structures and future markets in business and management education.

The three compulsory module for the 2014 International Deans' programme are:

  • 16-18 September 2014 at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Faculty of Business, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and City University of Hong Kong, College of Business, HK
  • 14-15 January 2015 in United Kingdom at Saïd Business School, Oxford,and Imperial College Business School, London, UK
  • 15-16 April 2015 in Copenhagen Business School, DK and School of Economics and Management, Lund University, SE

Other benefits of joining the programme include:

  • Global networking with the potential for long-term collaboration
  • Time to think and engage in current debates on the future of management and business education
  • Psychometrics: MBTI, 16PF, FIRO-B, 360 feedback
  • Join a network of over 75 business school deans from 23 different countries that have already participated in the programme
  • Please note that this programme is aimed at recently appointed directors general/deans of the whole business school only.

More information is available here  and you can register online.  If you have any questions or require further information please do not hesitate to contact EFMD colleague This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. directly.

6th Global Peter Drucker Forum: "The Great Transformation - Managing our Way to Prosperity”

drucker 2014

As a premier partner and founding supporter of the Global Peter Drucker Forum, EFMD supports the endeavour to advance management thinking on the foundation of Peter Drucker’s ideas and ideals.

The 6th Global Peter Drucker Forum: "The Great Transformation -  Managing our Way to Prosperity” will take place in Vienna, Austria, this November 13-14 and we invite you to join world-class management thinkers and practitioners.

Chaired this year by Harvard Business Review Editor in Chief Adi Ignatius, the Forum brings together top executives and noted scholars to discuss the most pressing issues of the day. The dialogue is informed and animated by the writing and spirit of the late Peter F. Drucker, who is widely considered "the father of modern management."  

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Clayton Christensen, Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
  • Rick Goings, CEO, Tupperware Brands
  • Gary Hamel, Management Expert, Consultant, MIX Co-Founder and Professor at London Business School
  • Herminia Ibarra, Professor of Leadership and Learning and Professor of Organisational Behavior, INSEAD
  • Adi Ignatius, Editor in Chief, Harvard Business Review
  • Julia Kirby, Editor at Large, Harvard Business Review
  • Rita Gunther McGrath, Professor, Columbia Business School
  • Roger L. Martin, Academic Director, Martin Prosperity Institute, Rotman School of Management
  • Nilofer Merchant, Writer
  • Marc Merrill, President and Co-Founder of Riot Games
  • Vineet Nayar, Vice Chairman of HCL Technologies, Founder, Sampark Foundation
  • Martin Wolf, Chief Economics Commentator, The Financial Times

A background article on the forum theme "The Great Transformation -  Managing our Way to Prosperity” has just been published in the latest issue of EFMD's Global Focus Magazine.

More information about the speakers and program outline is available via www.druckerforum.org

EFMD members have access to a reduced registration fee of 25% during the early bird period ending on July 15 from a combination of early bird discount and EFMD members reduction. To benefit from the EFMD reduced registration fee, click here to register and enter your Group code: « EFMD » or copy in your browser www.druckerforum.org/registration

We hope you will be able to join EFMD and the Drucker Society in Vienna for this high stimulating and excititng conference. If you have any questions regarding registration, do not hesitate to contact the Drucker Forum Secretariat This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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EFMD Support the Fifth International Business School Shanghai Conference

antaiEFMD is delighted to be a strategic partner of the Fifth International Business School Shanghai Conference that will be hosted by Antai College of Economics and Management (ACEM), Shanghai Jiao Tong University on Oct. 9-10, 2014.

Innovation and entrepreneurship are widely recognized as effective ways to revitalize the global economy. International markets seek new ideas and innovative business practices, which have the potential to strengthen and stabilize economic growth. So many regions, including China, are striving to develop entrepreneurial management practices and create supportive environments that foster and enable innovation.

Business schools are the origins of many successful entrepreneurship practices, and play a vital role in boosting development of economies and the prosperity of business. This requires the business education industry to reflect on questions such as how to nurture management talents who are able to generate new ideas and implement the ideas in innovative ways.

Therefore, the conference has established Innovation and Entrepreneurship as its theme. It is expected to foster discussions on the latest developments in innovation and entrepreneurship, and exchange viewpoints on two parallel session topics: “How Business Schools’ Innovation Education is Driving Sustainable Development” and “Business Schools’ Education about Entrepreneurship”.

In addition, the IBSSC features two pre-sessions on business schools’ development. Some changes in international accreditation standards indicate that the innovation and sustainability of business schools are increasingly recognized as priorities, so:

  • Pre-session 1 will focus on the topic of “New International Accreditation Standards for the New Management Education Era”, to discuss the trend and how business schools will respond to it.
  • Pre-session 2 will explore the topic of “Future of Management Education: Emerging Opportunities for Asian B-schools”.

The biennial IBSSC is one of the most important forums held by ACEM. Since the first successful conference in 2006, the IBSCC has itself become an international brand and the largest dean-level conference for business schools in the Asia-Pacific region.

An outstanding line up of speakers includes:

  • Prof. Peter Blair Henry, Dean of Leonard N. Stern School of Business, New York University, USA     
  • Prof. Soumitra Dutta, Dean of Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University, USA     
  • Prof. Gnanalingam Anandalingam, Dean of Imperial College Business School, UK
  • Prof. Alfons Sauquet, Dean of ESADE Business School, Spain     
  • Prof. CAI Hongbin, Dean of Guanghua School of Management, Peking University, P. R. China
  • Prof. William Boulding, Dean of Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, USA     
  • Prof. Edouard Husson, Dean of ESCP Europe Business School, France
  • Prof. Fiona Devine, Head of Manchester Business School, UK     
  • Prof. Emerson de Almeida, President of the Board Committee of Fundação Dom Cabral, Brazil
  • Prof. Chris Styles, Dean of Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, Australia   
  • Prof. Steef van de Velde, Dean, Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University, Netherland  
  • Prof. Larry Edward Penley, President of Thunderbird School of Global Management, USA     
  • Prof. Santiago Iñiguez de Onzoño, Dean of IE Business School, Spain (TBC)     
  • Prof. Hirokazu Kono, Dean of Keio Business School, Japan     
  • Prof. WU Xiaobo, Dean of School of Management, Zhejiang University, P. R. China

The conference convenes more than 100 deans/general directors from overseas business schools, and 100 local Chinese business school deans, who exchange their ideas on cutting-edge topics in the field of management education. Due to its focused themes, global scale and western and eastern integration, the IBSSC has already become an extremely valuable forum for business schools around world, and Antai is committed to developing the IBSSC into the most influential management forum in the international management education circle.

Who should attend?
Deans, Directors, Rectors and Vice Deans from leading business schools in the world; top executives from international organizations in the business education industry.

For more information about the conference and reserving your seats, please refer to the website http://www.acem.sjtu.edu.cn/intl/conferences/5_en/index.html, or contact Antai College of Economics and Management via Tel: +86-21-52302510; Fax: +86-21-52302511; Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please join us in Shanghai in October for this unique event. Registration details are here.

Invitation to International Summer Programme at McGill in Montreal

Desautels logoThis International Summer Program at the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill runs 2-30 July 2014  and is designed to provide international undergraduate students the opportunity to gain critical North American perspectives on issues of global importance.

The program offers two courses: In Managing in North America, current global  questions are analysed and potential solutions are discussed that correspond to the unique character and needs of the Canadian, American, and Mexican economies. In Global Branding, understanding and appreciation of brands is enhanced and participants develop theories, models, and tools to improve the ability to create and evaluate local and global brand strategies. Each course is worth three McGill credits, equivalent to six ECTS credits, to be approved by each student’s home university.

The McGill campus is located in the heart of multicultural, metropolitan Montreal. As a major cultural and technological centre, Montreal offers students unparalleled opportunities to explore life outside the classroom. Full details about application and registration, as well as FAQ are here.

You may also be interested to know more about the approaches in the International Masters in Practicing Management, IMPM. In this EFMD Global Focus magazine article, Leslie Breitner and Dora Koop explain how the IMPM programme has retained its freshness as one of the world’s most innovative senior management programmes.

Last year in May, the Henry Mintzberg, IMPM & EFMD Special Workshop in Brussels also focused on developing practicing managers and their organisations, and the EFMD upcoming events are here.

EFMD Launch Business School Impact System (BSIS)

BSIS

At the 2014 EFMD Deans & Director General Conference in Gothenburg hosted by the University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law, EFMD officially launched BSIS - Business School Impact Survey.

Prof Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General of EFMD said, "BSIS is a vital addition to the EFMD portfolio of services as it provides a process and tool to capture the value that a school brings to a defined region. It is a service for any business school anywhere in the world that is interested in collecting key statistical data on its impact. Once collected this information can then be used both internally and externally with key stakeholders to widen the debate about "the role of business schools in society" and showcase the enormous added value and impact they bring to a community."

The BSIS scheme identifies the tangible and intangible benefits that a business school brings to its local environment. For example, a school spends money in its impact zone; it provides jobs and pays salaries that are partially spent in the zone; and it attracts faculty and students from outside the zone whose expenditures contribute to the local economy. Beyond this measurable financial impact, a school contributes to the life of the community in numerous ways. Its faculty generate new business creation through entrepreneurial projects and support local business needs through professional training. Its students are a source of dynamism in the life of the region and are a valuable talent resource when they graduate. A business school also provides an important intellectual forum for the introduction of new ideas in a wide variety of social, cultural and political areas of concern within a region. Last but not least, it contributes to the image of the city or region.

"Demonstrating the many ways in which they add economic and social value to the environment in which they operate has become a challenge for business schools. To meet this demand for greater accountability, BSIS is an effective tool to help schools identify, measure and communicate all the positive contributions they make to the world around them," added Prof. Gordon Shenton, Senior Advisor, EFMD.

At a time when all organisations, public or private, are being held accountable for their activities, there is a need to demonstrate the impact that they are having on their immediate environment. This is particularly the case when they are financed or politically supported by local stakeholders.

"From my experience of BSIS in seven French Business Schools (La Rochelle Business School, IAE Lyon, Groupe ESC Troyes, Audencia, IAE Grenoble, EM Normandie and Toulouse Business School) the first benefit of BSIS was unexpected, as the process significantly raised the awareness within the school of the importance of its impact on the Region. The second major benefit from going through the BSIS review was it substantially improved communication with all of the key stakeholders of the Business Schools," said Michel Kalika, Senior Advisor, EFMD.

The BSIS scheme was initially designed by FNEGE (the French National Foundation for Management Education) and is already well established in the French higher education arena. The BSIS process has been adapted for an international audience and is now offered in a joint venture between EFMD and FNEGE as a service to EFMD members in any part of the world.

If you would like further information or are interested in your school taking part you can visit www.efmd.org/bsis or please contact: Gordon SHENTON: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Michel KALIKA: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

MOOCs in Higher Education: Avalanche, Disruption or Transformation?

eualogoEUA has published last week its second Occasional Paper on the topic of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). It is designed to inform and update interested stakeholders on the broad range of MOOCs developments that have taken place in recent months and is a follow-up to the first paper published at the beginning of 2013. Authored by Michael Gaebel, Director of the Higher Education Policy Unit at EUA, it also looks in detail at a number of issues related to the development of MOOCs that are directly relevant for universities. These include:

  • EUAMOOCupdate coverOverview of international MOOC facilitators
  • Mapping European MOOCs
  • European initatives in detail
  • Motives for MOOCs in Europe and in other parts of the world
  • Observations regarding production and maintenance, income generation, implications on learning and teaching, learners and teachers, awarding credits, ownership of MOOCs.

The final section of the paper outlines some “points for further consideration for European higher education” notably in terms of:

  • The evolution and potential benefits of MOOCs
  • The “responsibility of the university”.
  • Broader strategic considerations

efmdbook2 coverYou can download the full paper (35-pages) from the dedicated EUA website. Also this year's EUA annual conference has the theme "Changing Landscapes in Learning and Teaching", it will take place on  3-4 April 2014, hosted by Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium and registrations are now open. More information is also on this earlier EFMD blog post. You may also be interested in the EFMD 40th anniversary books. In Securing the Future of Management Education, the impact of technology is explored in chapter 6 under Blind spots, Dominant logics, Tipping points and Critical issues for the future.  It deals – amongst others – with geography and modes of learning as well as technology and the incumbent business school model. You can find out all about this new book here.

To MOOC or Not To MOOC, That is the Question

johanroosGuest Post from Johan Roos, Dean, Jönköping International Business School, Sweden

The MOOCs phenomenon – Massive Open Online Courses – comes with either the threat or promise of disruptive innovation in one of the fundamental pillars of society: higher education. How should business schools deal with this phenomenon?

 MOOCs are networked higher education courses delivered on the net to anyone with a thick internet connection, anywhere. The first MOOC was offered in 2008 – and was a result of the convergence of distance (“e-“) learning and the accelerating bandwidth of the internet. The acronym speaks to the promises that MOOCs offer:

  • cable worldMassive. The technology enables thousands of students to enroll and participate at any time in courses about anything taught by talented professors from any institution in the world.
  • Open.  They are open in several respects. Anyone can enroll. Students may pay a symbolic fee to get the formal credit from the host institution, but they do not pay for participation in the course.  The material produced by faculty is open and shared openly.
  • Online. Participants network openly with faculty, among themselves, and with others who are online. Content is always available on the net and can take many forms, like articles, books, videos, tweets and tags.
  • Courses.  MOOCs can cover just about any course taught in a traditional university setting, from humanities to social sciences, to even the hard sciences. Almost no type of course is MOOC ineligible.

The arguments between MOOCs proponents and skeptics are filling newspaper articles, blog posts, tweets and conferences. Will MOOCs fundamentally transform higher education, or is it just hype playing on the emotional appeal of “bringing inexpensive higher education to millions?” No matter what it is, it seems clear that university leaders need to start paying greater attention.

Learnings from Two Conferences: Over the last weeks, I attended two meetings for business school leaders where the MOOCs theme surfaced center stage: the 2014 EFMD Conference for Deans & Directors General in Gothenburg and the 2014 AACSB Deans Conference in San Francisco. These meetings attracted respectively more than 300 and 600 business school leaders from all over the world. During the sessions, I learned about the leading providers of MOOCs:

  1. A few Stanford science and engineering professors began offering their courses online and founded the for-profit MOOCs providers Udacity and Coursera.
  2.  The MOOCs landscape today includes a range of for- and non-profit providers with their own twist, including KhanAcademy, Udemy, and CodeAcademy.
  3. MIT and Harvard formed a new approach, the edX consortium, which currently includes many Ivy League quality universities in the world. In July 2013, edX went open-source and shared the software needed to develop MOOCs.
  4. In September 2013, Google signed up with edX to create a portal website that will go live in a few months  mooc.org – which they hope will soon become a YouTube for MOOCs. (Google is already a member of the Udacity initiated Open Education Alliance.)

Understanding the debate: At the two gatherings, we heard from both MOOCs proponents and skeptics. Simon Nelson, CEO of FutureLearn (“Learn anytime, anywhere”), gave a sobering view of the possibilities of MOOCs, reminding us they are a merely an extension of the Open University approach already in place for 40 years. His message: Forget the hype about the end of universities. Higher ed just needs to learn how to augment their content with crowd interaction and great online user-experiences. Some claimed MOOCs have already gone from good to great. Paul Stacey of Creative Common praised one of the first MOOCs, ds106.us for its fundamental social learning, open pedagogy and underlying “constructivism” philosophy of education. His message: don’t let these fundamentals slip.

MOOCdrawingCoursera co-founder Daphny Koller (“Take the World’s Best Courses, On-Line, for Free”) and Ben Nelson, founder of Minerva (“Only the world’s brightest, most motivated students will be invited to attend”) represented the contrast between Massively & Open-oriented vs. Small & Elite-oriented.  Their overall message was that MOOCs will help teaching reclaim prominence in today’s research-biased higher education world.

From the debate, Q&As, and informal talk during these gatherings, it became clear to me that in MOOCs lie both opportunities and threats for all higher education institutions, including business schools. Some will find natural strengths to integrate MOOCs into their strategy, like the renowned universities that have already signed up with big MOOC providers. But others will have faculty members who adamantly oppose MOOCs, and some institutions will assert their territorialism.

We are seeing this already. On 2 May 2013, professors in the philosophy department at San Jose State University, CA wrote a letter to Michael Sandel, a Harvard professor whose MOOC on Justice they felt infringed on their own curriculum. The letter urged Sandel to “not produce products that will replace professors, dismantle departments, and provide a diminished education for students in public universities.” But one of the commentaries on this letter countermanded, “…we also need to face the fact that professors can be expendable and replaceable, especially when real financial constraints are considered.  That is tough on egos.” Similarly, 58 Harvard professors voiced their frustration that Harvard had become so deeply involved with edX without consulting them. In a letter to the dean they called for a new committee and greater oversight of MOOCs. The dean didn’t comply.

diplomaSo What’s Next? Personally, I see potential for symbiosis from the interaction of traditional higher education and MOOCs. On one hand, even the skeptics can’t ignore the gross enrolment numbers MOOCs can generate. In January 2014, one of the earliest MOOC providers signed up students at a daily rate of 10.000, totaling some 7 million participants. Skeptics point to low completion rates though, only 4 to 10%. But, even with completion rate of just 7%, the number of Coursera “graduates” equals all students currently enrolled in three Harvard Universities and one MIT combined. Such an achievement calls for celebration, IMO!

I also agree with the criticisms about traditional lectures and often ask faculty why any student should spend time listening to one in an auditorium. Students tell me they rather get an App or go to an online site where they can watch a video of the lecture whenever and wherever they like. They also want to be able to choose the video of a more talented professor—and we are seeing this happen– celebrity professors who are becoming like rockstars.

But questions remain: Will students and employers value a MOOC diploma as much as the one from a “real” university? What is the perceived value of an “accreditation” of a course made by a Nobel Laureate compared to an international accreditation agency? A few days ago 110.000 people had signed up for the first such MOOC, offered by Laureate Robert Schiller,  who gained the prize in 2013. Can MOOC providers continue to operate with a viable business model? And who will pay for the professorial time devoted to develop and run MOOCs, especially in institutions already stretched financially?

What will evolve next is an open question for all of us. If MOOCs represent the tsunami some people claim they are, it is difficult to see how resistance to them will prevail. The next step would at least be for universities to open up to substituting MOOCs for some their own courses in programs delivered on campus. I am sure the MOOCs providers are exploring viable business models that could let this happen, and quality ensured licensing looks like the natural choice.

jonkoping logoIn my business school, JIBS, I want us to be ready for this possibility. That is why we recently launched a strategic project with a dual purpose: 1) to explore how we could encourage some faculty members to develop MOOCs and learn from this; and 2) how we can integrate others’ MOOCs into our degree programs. At least, we’re taking a first step.

GSE / EFMD Global Focus Collection Now Available in the SOL Library

solSpecialist publishers and partners of EFMD, Greenleaf Publishing and GSE Research have launched a new online collection of books and journals in sustainability, CSR, corporate governance, ethics, environmental policy and management, and related fields.

The collection also includes the GSE/EFMD Global Focus collection that contains over 100 papers focusing on sustainability, social responsibility, and business and executive education.

Containing almost 400 volumes, the Sustainable Organization Library (SOL) gives instant access to an international collection, for use in study, research and executive education. The books and journals in SOL have never previously been available as a collection, and many have never been available at all digitally.

The Sustainable Organization Library also includes subscriptions to Greenleaf’s Journal of Corporate Citizenship, and Business Peace and Sustainable Development journals, and draws on material from a number of international publishing partners. More information is available at www.greenleaf-publishing.com/sol

Greenleaf Director John Peters said: “There has never been a more pressing need to bring sustainability into business practice and management education. This can’t be seen as ‘nice to do’ any more – it’s must do.”

“Sustainability is one of the key issues for the 21st century – this is an exceptional collection that will be of great value to business schools, companies and NGO's all over the world,” said Prof. Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General, EFMD.

SOL is available to buy outright, or on an annual subscription, and is hosted on the well-established IngentaConnect platform. SOL operates under the simple and straightforward SERU (Shared e-Resource Understanding) licence created by NISO, the US National Standards Institute, with no digital rights management (DRM) restrictions. This makes SOL available to all members of an organization.

In the SOL collection, each chapter or paper– more than 5,000 – is tagged individually, so users can easily find individual items that are relevant to them.

Professor Simon Mercado, Associate Dean at Nottingham Business School commented: “This is a welcome innovation for all of us committed to responsible leadership values and sustainability-related research and education.”

Greenleaf Publishing was launched 21 years ago following the first Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and now has representation in the USA and India, as well as publishing offices in Leeds and Sheffield, UK. Greenleaf is an independent publisher, which works in partnership with many international organizations including EFMD and PRME, the United Nations Principles for Responsible Management Education.

To review our book titles, or if you are interested in writing for Greenleaf, go to our site www.greenleaf-publishing.com.

Free trials of the SOL collection are available to all EFMD members. To request a free trial, please forward this to your institution’s librarian. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Or contact Greenleaf Publishing, Aizlewood’s Mill, Nursery Street, Sheffield S3 8GG, UK; telephone +44 114 282 3475.

The Mounting Momentum of MOOCs - An Update on the Rapid Growth of MOOCs

mooc14-2This paper is a sequel to the White Paper: MOOCs Are on the Move, first published in January 2013. The purpose of this paper is to observe the growth and impact the concept of MOOCs have had over the past year as well as some key issues and emerging trends. This paper comes with a qualifier: the growth of MOOCs continues to be exponential and as soon as an article or paper is published about MOOCs it can often be out-of-date within a matter of weeks or even days.

What are MOOCs
Although awareness of the term MOOCs has grown significantly during the past year, there are now different forms and variations of MOOCs. The term MOOCs comes from the original concept of Massive Open Online Courses and which mainly applies to short courses offered by universities and higher education providers. MOOCs aggregators offer a range of free online courses covering an increasing number of topics delivered by qualified lecturers from some of the most well-known universities in the world. A key aspect of MOOCs is the access they provide to quality learning and development courses for virtually everyone, anytime, anywhere in the world with internet access.

Over the past year awareness of MOOCs and participation in courses has grown significantly. This is reflected in the example of one of the largest MOOC aggregators Coursera, which in November 2012 had 1.9 million Courserians, or registered students. By November 2013 this had grown to 5.5 million Courserians, representing an average growth rate of 9,860 people registering as students per day, up from 8,100 per day a year earlier.

moocs14Major MOOCs
Coursera (www.coursera.org) is still the biggest MOOC platform providing 530 different courses, up from 212 a year before. As well, the number of university and institutional partners has trebled from 33 to 107, with the majority being well-known and highly regarded universities. As mentioned above, Coursera now has 5.5 million students from 190 countries and they are taught by 730 professors/course instructors. The main types of courses students register for on Coursera are computer sciences, 41%, humanities 17% and business and management 15%

Being the biggest MOOCs aggregator, Coursera is also trying to maintain this position by being the MOOCs innovator. It is currently developing a network of learning hubs in such locations as Chennai, Helsinki, Phnom Penh, Prague, Shanghai, Moscow and Seoul to provide its students with a blended learning model that combines selected online MOOCs with face-to-face sessions with local tutors and interactions with other students. The learning hubs, mainly in developing countries, will allow students without computers to access the MOOCs offered through Coursera, thereby expanding according to their principle of providing accessible education to interested students anywhere. This is also supported by a limited number of MOOCs available in Chinese, Italian, Spanish, German and French.

Udacity (www.udacity.com) has a niche offering of approximately 30 computer science and mathematics courses with a range of topics from beginner courses to intermediate and advanced courses and feature a learning-by-doing approach. As students complete all the requirements of their course they receive a certificate of completion.

EdX (www.edx.org) owned by the prestigious academic institutions Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), draws content from a selection of their highly regarded courses. The consortium has grown during the past year to 30 university partners that are among the most highly regarded in their regions. The 94 courses now offered reflect those of more traditional universities and include biology, philosophy, physics, science, history, music, engineering, chemistry, economics and finance.

In September Edx announced a partnership with Google to develop MOOC.org, which is proposed to launch in mid-2014 as a site that will enable teachers, businesses and anybody else with an interest in learning and development or a passion for a topic to create their own digital course and have it hosted and listed as a course on the site.

Google has demonstrated an interest in education over a number of years and the partnership with Edx seems a logical progression that reflects many of Google’s grounding principles of openness and creating a platform that facilitates networks and enables people to collaborate. This development will be supported by Google’s other resources including Google Play for Education, Google Apps for Education as well as Education YouTube.

Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) is a MOOC platform originally providing courses for young learners from kindergarten to Year 12 with courses centred on mathematics and science: biology, chemistry and physics, as well as some elements of economics and history. Over the past year Khan Academy has expanded its range and level of courses to attract young leaners, as well as teachers, parents and anybody with an interest in a mathematics or science subject. Given the breadth of study levels, Khan Academy recently introduced a learning dashboard hub for their ‘world of maths’ for students to answer a series of online questions to ascertain what they know, gaps in their knowledge and where to start their learning at the level most appropriate for them. Khan Academy also provides electronic badges that reward each student’s achievements and students can analyse their learning records to identify what they have learnt and their learning performance.

FutureLearn (www.futurelearn.com) is the first United Kingdom-led MOOCs aggregator and the newest major player having launched in September 2013 with an initial trial of 20 quality courses consistent with their theme of “inspiring learning for life.” FutureLearn is owned by The Open University in partnership with 20 prestigious UK and international universities as well as the British Council, British Library and British Museum.

FutureLearn is already exploring opportunities for generating revenue from its free courses by allowing students to purchase a Certificate of Participation once they complete key elements of a particular MOOC. Students will also be able to obtain a Statement of Attainment for certain courses after paying to sit an invigilated exam at selected physical locations around the world. In order to sit for the exam students will need to provide two forms of identification that match with their student registration information. The Statement of Attainment will show the student’s name, course title, the name and logo of the university that delivered the course, the number of study hours per week required for the course and the actual percentage score the student achieved in the exam. At this stage, the Statement of Attainment will have no formal recognition by universities but it can be used as evidence by a student of continuing professional development and with potential employers to demonstrate their understanding of a particular topic.

Alison (www.alison.com) was launched from Ireland in 2007 and began delivering free, open online courses before the term ‘MOOC’ came into existence. Unlike most MOOC aggregators, Alison began generating revenue from launch by providing the online courses free but charging for extras, such as certificates and diplomas, as well as income from advertising links on the site.

Alison currently offers over 590 predominately vocational courses across certificate and diploma levels in ten languages. The certificate level courses require 1–2 hours study while the more rigorous diploma courses require 9–11 hours study. In particular, Alison allows the student to pace their own
learning with no time limit on completing a course. To meet the requirements for a certificate, a student must complete all the modules in a course and achieve at least 80% in the assessment, which can be taken multiple times, in order to purchase their certificate. An important feature of the Alison
testing facility is the option for an employer or recruiter to login to the site and have a student undertake a short quiz to test the knowledge of a student and the validity of their certificate.

Major Developments in MOOCs During The Past 12 Months moocs14-1

Rapid Increase in the Number of MOOCs
The obvious trend during the past year has been the number of MOOCs now available, both with the increase in the number of courses offered by established MOOC aggregators as well as the number of new aggregators. Instead of working through a MOOC aggregator some universities have started piloting their own MOOCs during the past year offering selected open courses for people to undertake as a taste of higher education or a particular topic. Some universities have also progressed to the stage of offering students the option to pay for online support from a lecturer and the possibility of sitting for an invigilated exam. Students who achieve a prescribed pass level in the exam can receive partial credit for a subject when they enrol in a degree program with that university.

In addition, many high profile and elite universities are now offering their standard courses as open courses where people can watch the standard lectures online and access course slides and materials. To achieve the formal qualification people need to apply, meet the entry criteria, enrol with the respective universities, pay the program fees and satisfactorily complete all the assessment requirements associated with each course.

How to Choose a MOOC
Given the rapid increase in the number of MOOCs available, a new challenge is finding the right MOOC to suit an individual’s learning aspirations, timing and content relevance. This has led to the launch of MOOC List (www.mooc-list.com) which claims to offer a complete list of all available MOOCs by category, university/entity, course length and estimated effort required to undertake the course. Having decided on a potential MOOC, it is possible to obtain further insight by using another initiative called CourseTalk (www.coursetalk.org) to check evaluations and ratings by students who have completed that course.

Multi-Lingual MOOCs
While English is the traditional language of the internet, a number of MOOC aggregators, including Coursera and EdX are starting to offer some courses in a range of languages, particularly Chinese and French. As well, the first MOOC platform for the Arab world, called Edraak, is currently under development using the Open EdX platform.

Security and Validating Students
There has been a significant focus on security and validation of students registering for MOOCs. Validation becomes an issue once a student wishes to receive certification for their participation and assessment in a MOOC and it becomes an even greater issue once a student wants to sit for an exam that has credit potential.

As Coursera has received 10 million assignments since its launch in April 2012, developing a more effective system for validating students and their assessment was a priority. In January 2013 Coursera launched the Signature Track program as a means of authenticating students and issuing validated
certificates, for a fee. Students complete an identify validation process including photograph verification and keystroke monitoring, which records a student’s typing pattern and rhythm as a biometric style of security. As students login for an exam they type a short phrase that is matched against those on their registration records.

MOOCs Assignments for Credit
While the majority of MOOCs are not recognised by universities for credit toward degree programs, there have been some developments in this area during the past year.

The American Council on Adult Education (ACE) has been investigating the possibility of MOOCs being approved for credit in a pilot with five courses offered through Coursera. While the five courses have been approved for academic credit, the approval is based on the structure and content of the courses and not on the learning outcomes. As universities have the authority to self-accredit programs and courses, they also have the discretion to determine whether they will recognise certain MOOCs and to what extent they might provide some form of credit towards a degree program. Currently, most universities are still observing the development of MOOCs without any commitment to providing credit toward formal degree programs.

However, some universities have started offering MOOCs that are units from courses of selected degree programs. Students completing the MOOC have the option of sitting for an invigilated exam and the results can provide partial credit toward a university degree course.
Respected higher education institution Georgia Institute of Technology in the United States has announced plans to offer a Master’s degree in computer science through MOOCs at a fraction of the cost of the on-campus costs. The course will be like a normal MOOC with content and materials accessible for free to anybody who registers for the program. Students who enrol in the MOOC-based degree program will pay about 20% of the normal fees and will sit for formal exams as well have access to tutors and other support services.  (The New York Times). 

Some MOOCs become SPOCs
Another development of MOOCs is SPOCs - Small Private Online Courses. Harvard University is a leader in this area and it could be a possible next step for students who complete a MOOC. People receive a taste of a particular topic or study area in a MOOC and if they want to go the next step they can participate in a SPOC. In choosing to take the next step, students are more likely to be willing to pay a fee to participate in a course that features limited class size, provides more customised tuition and offers assessed assignments that can be used as credit toward selected formal programs.

The SPOCs still incorporate many of the features of MOOCs: online, flexible accessibility for those enrolled in the course and a mix of interested participants from diverse industries and backgrounds around the world. This diverse mix with a smaller select group of participants can add to the richness of online discussions, interactions and experiences that enables participants to learn from each other.

Criticism of Low Completion Rates for MOOCs
There have been numerous articles about the low completion rates by students in MOOCs, which generally range from about 4% up to 10% of total students registered for a course. However, the reporting of the low number of completions is distorted as up to 50% of people registered for a course never watch the first video module, so they don’t actually commence the course but are included in the numbers as not completing. Most universities and higher education institutions allow students to attend the first one-to-two sessions of a course with the flexibility to withdraw before a specified census date without being included in the class numbers or incurring any grade or financial penalties.

This approach acknowledges that students may withdraw from a course due to workload, clashes with other subject timetables, work commitments, family reasons and changes in personal circumstances.

A more realistic assessment of the low completion rate would be to exclude everybody who has registered for a MOOC and never watched the first video module or until they begin the first online self-assessment test as this would better reflect those who seriously intend to undertake the course. Some people register for a course out of curiosity and once the video commences they have a better understanding of the topic to make an informed decision to continue with the course.

Research on the Role and Future of MOOCs
One significant development of the past year is the move to undertake more formal research on the role of MOOCs, the importance and contribution of MOOCs and possible future scenarios for MOOCs. This reflects the growing interest in MOOCs and the need to progress beyond the continual opinion- based articles discussing latest developments and ongoing criticisms of MOOCs compared to traditional university courses.

The MOOC Research Initiative was launched in August 2013 with the purpose of exploring the potential for MOOCs to extend access to postsecondary credentials through more personalised and more affordable pathways. The MOOC Research Institute is funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and currently has 28 MOOC research projects underway.

Summary
Given the rapid growth in the number and variety of MOOCs during the past year and the fact many universities are formally acknowledging their existence and the potential to create pathways for lifelong and continuing learning, MOOCs are more than just a fad. However, their primary role is an introduction or taste of higher education or a specific topic.

For students, the opportunity to access and undertake a MOOC on almost any subject for free gives them a taste for a particular topic that could lead to further study and possible career opportunities.

For universities and higher education institutions MOOCs are a marketing opportunity to promote the university and selected courses and programs. Exploring the potential to provide partial credit towards certain degree courses enables universities to attract a broader range of students as well as make enrolment offers to students that demonstrate commitment and successful outcomes from MOOCs.

For employers, with the increasing number of MOOCs offering certificates of participation and completion that can be validated, there is the opportunity to identify potential employees with knowledge and understanding of particular topics as well as a personal commitment to their ongoing professional development. In addition, employers can utilise MOOCs to tailor professional development for each employee to develop their knowledge, skills and capability according to the evolving needs of the organisation.

About the Author
Dr Lindsay Ryan is Director of Corporate Education Advisers. Lindsay is a strategic thinker in organisational learning and development that enables organisations to develop their capability and capacity. Utilising leading-edge research, Lindsay assists organisations adopt a strategic approach to employee training and development to ensure all corporate education and training aligns with the organisation’s goals and strategic direction. Based in Adelaide, Australia, Lindsay’s work is highly regarded internationally and he is also Visiting Fellow in Corporate Education with Birmingham City Business School in the United Kingdom. For further information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EFMD's Global Focus - See the Future

See-the-Future

This is the 21st issue of the magazine since it was launched in January 2007, so we can, to some extent, claim that Global Focus has “come of age”.

Global Focus was conceived as a way of improving communication between the EFMD and its members. But it was always regarded as something rather more sophisticated than a simple PR tool. It was seen as a forum for lively debate and information on the major current issues of management education and a way for EFMD to formulate, consolidate and share policy on the basis of its European underpinning and its increasingly global outreach and vision.

It has played a full part in the work of EFMD, publicising and reporting on meetings and conferences and providing background briefings and interviews with key speakers as well as, for example, explaining the development of policy in key areas such as accreditation.The seven years covered by these 21 issues have, of course, been among the most volatile and disruptive in the long history of management education. And their effects have yet to become totally apparent.

Global Focus has worked hard to keep up with these developments though a wide range of articles and features that particularly address the key issues facing EFMD member organisations. Many of the sector’s best-known and most effective thinkers and players have contributed articles or shared their thoughts in interviews.

The latest issue is no exception and features:

  • The future is out there
    Andrew Crisp reports on a major new study that explores the future challenges facing business schools

  • International Deans’ Programme 2014
    Gain unique insights into the multiple roles of deans of business and management schools in a cohort of around 20 participants from around the globe

  • Preparing leaders for tomorrow’s businesses
    The world is changing so fundamentally that business leaders who act as if the old rules still apply will find themselves and their organisations side lined or overtaken completely. However, say Thomas Malnight and Tracey Keys, those who adapt to this new world will be well placed to make the most of the opportunities it will offer

  • Moving on from Rio
    Last year’s Rio+20 UN summit may have been something of a disappointment but there were still some significant and positive outcomes say Anthony Buono, Jean-Christophe Carteron and Matthew Gitsham

  • Coping with complexity
    Personal resilience is an increasingly necessary tool to face the stress of a complex work environment. Fiona Dent and Viki Holton describe what it is and how to attain it

  • Employers still in love with MBAs
    Management education is increasingly valued by companies worldwide, according to the 2013 Corporate Recruiters Survey. Christophe Lejeune and Michelle Sparkman Renz report

  • The disappearing classroom
    Michael Desiderio describes how new technology is knocking down the walls of the Executive MBA for business leaders

  • PhDs and DBAs: two sides of the same coin?
    Laura Maguire, Elena Revilla and Angel Diaz look at the differences (and even more the similarities) between the traditional PhD programme and the newer Doctor of Business Administration

  • The IMPM innovations and teaching approach
    The International Masters in Practicing Management (IMPM) programme is 18 years old but continues to be seen as one the world’s most innovative senior management degree programmes. Leslie Breitner and Dora Koop explain how the programme has retained its freshness for so long

  • Accreditation – how to get it right
    María Helena Jaén outlines how to make the accreditation process as pain-free and rewarding as possible

  • Walking the talk: managing a management school
    It is one of the oldest and most common complaints – management schools are great at giving good advice to others but themselves rarely practise the management skills they preach. But it can be done. Loick Roche and Sabine Lauria explain how

  • ACE project offers new opportunities
    The new EFMD-backed Alliance of Chinese and European business schools (ACE) offers new opportunities for mutual understanding and increased co-operation says Martine Plompen

  • Soft skills in the business and personal world
    George Pennington provides a psychologist’s perspective on why training in soft skills is vital for business (and personal) life

  • Planting the seeds of change
    Lea Stadtler and Gilbert Probst describe how the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange came into being and the lessons it holds

  • More EQUAL than others?
    The European Quality Link (EQUAL) is one of the less well-known bodies in which EFMD is involved but is also one of the most innovative and long-standing. Irina Sennikova explains its role

Every issue of Global Focus is available digitially via this link.

We are always pleased to hear your thoughts on Global Focus, and ideas on what you would like to see in future issues. Please address comments and ideas to Matthew Wood at EFMD: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EFMD and Management Education in Africa

The interesting thing about Africa is that it is a living laboratory of the global world. There is growth potential, an abundance of natural resources but also developmental challenges as well as disparity and inequality. Derick de Jongh - based at the University of Pretoria in South Africa - believes that the continent is on the verge of a huge explosion of growth but he is worried that sustainability may get lost in the process. In African Futures - a recent Global Focus magazine article he says: “We need to challenge the basic foundation of the theory of for Upretoriainstance economics, or marketing or finance. That takes guts, courage, a very open mind – almost a new breed of faculty”. He feels optimistic about the future in that there is a huge desire and demand for improved education at all levels across the continent and business education and development can and must play a critical role in moving the continent forward.

How can African business schools best serve the often unique needs of African businesses and people? Moustapha Mamba Guisassy gives an example in “Management in Africa”.  After elaborating on internal and external factors in the changes processes, he illustrates how IAM in Senegal established a school-community partnership. The efforts include modules on African anthropology and sociology, Fulani and Mandingo languages for business, research on entrepreneurship and immersion and incubation projects.


With the aim of encouraging the writing of case material, EFMD has been organising its annual Case Writing Competition for many years. The 2012 cases related to Africa included:

  • The “Ethiopia Commodity Exchange” case documents the establishment of a transparent and efficient commodity exchange in Ethiopia. The authors also explore the balancing act between the private and public interests in this partnership.

  • “Nuru Energy” is a social venture providing lighting solutions to 800 million poor people without access to the electricity grid in sub‐Saharan Africa.  The case describes the challenges of growing a social enterprise in Africa with a dual role – making a profit and a social impact.

  • The “Beauty of Sorbet” case covers a chain of beauty salons targeting upper income women in South African metropolitan areas with a strong focus on branding.

  • The “Black Rhino” case deals with the creation of a market for legalized black rhino hunting covering elements of Creative Capitalism and Stakeholder Theory and including all its polarizing and contradictory elements.

IAMlogoEconomic growth on the African continent and the demand for local managers backs the need for raising the level of African Business Schools. Following conferences in Cape Town and Nairobi, EFMD is very pleased to go to Senegal for the fourth edition of 2013 EFMD Africa Conference which will take place from 13-15 November 2013, hosted by Groupe IAM - Institut Africain de Management in Dakar, Senegal. Traditionally attracting over 100 participants from around the globe, a variety of corporate and academic speakers will provide input and lead discussions around the theme of “Entrepreneurship and Management Education in Africa: are we miseducating our students?.

See The Future - A Brave New World For Business Education

see future 2013

See The Future - A Brave New World For Business Education

A new survey on the future of business education suggests demand from students and employers is growing for a more sustainable, international and technological future.

A Brave New World For Business Education - Money Or Fulfillment, China Or Chicago, Sustainable or Shareholder Value, on Campus or Online?


A new survey on the future of business education suggests demand from students and employers is growing for a more sustainable, international and technological future.

With much uncertainty in business education during the global financial crisis, CarringtonCrisp, supported by EFMD and ABS, launched the See the Future research study to better understand some of the key issues in business education over the next few years.

Andrew Crisp, one of the authors of the See the Future report commented “Students are embracing change faster than business schools. Many of the changes have been accelerated by the global financial crisis, vast growth in international study and rapid adoption of new technologies. The generation entering business schools today have grown up with digital technology, it’s a core part of their lives, they expect it to be part of education and understand it offers the opportunity for lifestyle learning”.

Working with 37 business schools CarringtonCrisp conducted an online survey that attracted 5365 respondents from 137 different nationalities. Some of the key findings are set out below.

Value of a business education

  • More students value a business education to get a more fulfilling job rather than a more highly paid job

Business in society

  • Over 70% agree that business models need to change to better engage with society
  • More than 81% agree that business needs to be about more than just maximising shareholder value
  • However 8% of prospective undergraduates disagreed that business leaders should behave ethically at all times

Sustainability, ethics and corporate social responsibility

  • More than 80% of respondents agree that ‘sustainability and ethics should be embedded in all business education programmes’
  • Just under half of all respondents agree that ‘schools that don’t teach sustainability, corporate social responsibility and ethics should be ranked lower than those that do’
  • Over 60% of respondents agree that ‘business schools should run projects to give back to local, national or international organisations and communities’

Internationalism

  • While the USA and the UK remain the most popular destinations for international study, Singapore and China are on the rise, ranking 4th and 6th respectively with many respondents
  • More than 30% of respondents choose a international study destination because they are ‘attracted by the sporting and cultural profile of the country’
  • Over a third of all managers and directors agree that ‘graduates should learn another language as part of their degree’. 

Technology

  • More than 50% of all prospective students agree that they ‘would not study a business programme in a MOOC’
  • Around half of all managers/directors agree that ‘I am uncertain of what a MOOC offers and how it can be part of a business degree’ and that ‘I would not recruit a graduate who had only studied online’
  • More than 60% of all current students agree that ‘For academics, technology often means little more than using a PowerPoint presentation’
  • Over 70% of prospective and current students and alumni want lifestyle learning, using technology to learn around work and family commitments

Despite the uncertainty and upheaval in business education, between 70% and 80% agree that business is a force for good in society. Demand for business education seems likely to remain strong, albeit with changing content, in different locations, delivered in new formats and with changed outcomes.

Background information
Data was collected for the See the Future study in May 2013.  Respondents were prospective students, current students, alumni and employers. Copies of the full report are available for £360 (+VAT where applicable).  To purchase a copy of the full report email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or purchase by credit card through PayPal on the See the Future page.

For further information, please contact:

Andrew Crisp, CarringtonCrisp
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., +44 (0) 207 229 7373 or +44 (0) 7802 875260

Matthew Wood, EFMD
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., +32 2 629 08 10

MOOCs and Executive Education

uniconlogoThis UNICON Research Report focuses on MOOCs and executive education and starts by exploring the business models of Udacity, Coursera, EdX, Udemy and 2U.

For executive education, the developments in this area may provide opportunities for extending reach within organisations, for engaging faculty in new and exciting ways, and for providing educational opportunities that are more flexible in meeting participants’ needs,” concludes author Jennifer Stine.

However, there are also the unanswered questions about the long-term sustainability of MOOCs, and about how their adoption may impact faculty or could influence the strategic direction of institutions.

The author refers to how the disruptive innovation model was specifically applied to executive education in an Harvard Business Review Blog published in January 2013 by Berkeley faculty member Morten T. Hansen. The main drivers are repeated, being that:
  • companies have online learning platforms and will be looking for content thereby creating demand,
  • hybrid and online programmes are attractive from a cost/time perspective,
  • new technologies make the online experience more appealing, and
  • networking is increasingly going online which would lessen one of the key benefits of meeting face-to-face.
Surveying the Executive Education Audience
As part of the research project a nine question survey (in English and Spanish) was sent to past participants ofinsead open enrollment executive education programmes at five differnet business schools including EFMD members INSEAD and ITAM.

Interesting findings include:
  • Affinity for on-line programmes is evenly distributed over age ranges. The highest percentage of respondents to the English language survey were in the 40-49 age range, in the Spanish language survey respondents were a decade younger.
  • Programmes that combine on-line and face-to-face are reported as the type of training having most value in terms of personal learning (according to 45.5% English and 52.5% Spanish survey respondents). A much smaller percentage favour “on-line” programmes only: 15% in the English and 20% in the Spanishitam survey.
  • When evaluating the suitability of on-line education for executive education, 52% of respondents to the English language survey, and 68% of the respondents to the Spanish language survey, feel that online learning was well or highly suited for executive education.
  • Concerning conditions making it more likely to enrol in an on-line executive education programme, lower cost is an important factor for nearly half of the respondents. However, Spanish language respondents feel more strongly about course credits.
  • 80% of survey respondents report to have taken on-line or blended programmes, only a small number reported taking MOOC-model courses.
Leaders of executive education units were also interviewed as part of the research project and reports that:
  • Several types of innovations are being explored especially around deepening the learning experience.
  • Few are worried about the erosion of value in high-touch, high-end programmes such as leadership development.
  • There is concern, however, about the more skills-based, open enrollment programmes.
The UNICON research report “MOOCs and Executive Education” by Jennifer K.Stine is free to download from the UNICON website.

IFL
MOOCs and their impact on executive education will be a topic amongst many that will be explore and debated during the upcoming EFMD Executive Development Conference to be held from October 9 to 11, 2013, hosted by Stockholm School of Economics IFL Executive Education.

The theme for the conference is: “The New Frontiers of Executive Development” and you are warmly invited to join us.
 

EFMD Call to Participate in a Pilot Network Supporting Virtual Internships

ProvipWhat is a virtual internship?

International internships are gaining more and more importance in the context of the internationalization of higher education and globalization of our (professional) world. Traditional international work placements, where the learner travels abroad to the company, are not always feasible for all students because of financial, geographical, social or other reasons. For those physical placements abroad that do happen, there are also a number of difficulties to overcome, mainly related to a lack of communication between the student, the foreign company and the institution for higher education.

Virtual mobility and ICT-supported interaction can help address these issues. There are always three stakeholders involved in an international internship: the higher education institution, the student and the receiving company or organization. ICT-supported activities can be used to facilitate the interaction between these stakeholders. When the interaction between a student and a company is mainly ICT-supported, this is classed as a virtual placement.

The European project EU-VIP looked into the conditions for success when integrating virtual mobility in international internships. All of the results are available via www.euvip.eu.

The project noted that international internships are mostly the result of individual relationships or actions, while - for successful virtually supported placements - a structured implementation and collaboration between higher education institutions and companies is desirable. These issues are now being addressed in the follow-up project PROVIP (“Promoting Virtual Mobility in Placements”, 2012-2014), http://www.provip.info. This project is aimed at creating an international network of companies and study programmes in the fields of marketing, IT and engineering, interested in offering international internships to students, vip2supported or facilitated by virtual mobility. The whole internship process (before, during and after) will be supported through an online platform.

Who are we looking for?
We are looking for companies or their departments of marketing, IT and engineering willing to be part of this pilot network and its innovative approach towards international internships. We are also looking for study programmes in the same fields that can provide mature students who can work independently.
 
What can you expect from us?

For companies
  • An additional international pool of candidates for an internship
  • Contacts with higher education institutions from all over Europe, active within study fields related to your sector
  • A network that can serve as a bridge towards foreign markets, other languages and business cultures
  • Development of the online platform based on your needs and current practices regarding (international) internships
  • Input of extensive knowledge in the field of virtual mobility
For business schools and HEIs
  • An additional offer of virtual or virtually supported international internships to your students
  • Contacts with companies from all over Europe, active within sectors related to your study field
  • A possibility to further internationalize your curriculum and work on the intercultural competences of your students
  • Development of the online platform based on your needs and current practices regarding (international) internships
  • Input of extensive knowledge in the field of virtual mobility
What do we expect from you?
  • To promote your internships via the platform or to promote to your students the international virtual or virtually supported internships in addition to your “traditional” internships
  • Active participation in and use of the platform by the internship supervisor
  • To assist in platform evaluation
Timing?
  • June 2013: input of information about your needs and practices regarding internships
  • September / October 2013: short training session about the use of the platform
  • October 2013 – June 2014: pilot run of the network and platform, during this period evaluative input will be asked of the participants twice.
If you are iInterested to know more or to get involved, please contact Boriana Marinova at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

White Paper: MOOCs - Massive Open Online Courses

moocsMOOCs are on the Move: A Snapshot of the Rapid Growth of MOOCs

A White Paper by Dr Lindsay Ryan - January 2013

What are MOOCs
MOOCs are Massive Open Online Courses and they are rapidly changing the game for higher education, executive education and employee development generally. MOOCs offer free online courses covering a growing range of topics delivered by qualified lecturers from some of the most well-known universities in the world. In this age of lifelong learning, MOOCs are a means of providing learning and development to virtually everyone, anytime, anywhere in the world with internet access.

This paper presents a snapshot of current developments in MOOCs, noting that MOOCs have really only gathered momentum in the past year and are constantly developing and evolving almost on a weekly basis.

Background
The original concept for a MOOC came from academic research in the early 1960s with the idea that people could be linked by a series of computers to listen, discuss and learn about a particular topic. Now, continuous development in technology has become the enabler for virtually everybody in the world to have access to a broad and diverse range of education and learning topics.

MOOCs provide free online courses that enable people with an interest in a selected topic to study and learn through interaction with others also interested in the same topic. Other participants could be from the same organisation, city or region, learning together with people from other organisations, cities, regions and countries from around the world. MOOCs are the internet equivalent of distance education and there could be 1,000 or 100,000 participants in a single course.

MOOCs create the opportunity for vast numbers of people across the world to access learning through quality courses, content and lecturers that most would never have access to. For many people, further and higher education can seem overwhelming or beyond them. MOOCs open a world of opportunity for people in remote areas and developing countries as well as people with aspirations to achieve more with their lives. MOOCs are changing the traditional nature of education mainly being for the affluent and elite to being free and accessible to virtually everybody.

The growth of MOOCs is phenomenal. During the three months from mid-October to mid-January, including the quiet period for learning and development over Christmas-New Year, one major player, Coursera, continued to grow at the rate of 6,900 new participants (Courserians) PER DAY. Anything that grows at such a rate cannot be ignored and Coursera is just one of an increasing number of MOOC providers bringing together a diverse and expanding range of open online courses.

MOOCs started as a form of collaborative online learning with people interacting and learning from each other and being exposed to different perspectives, views and ideas. Over the past year, MOOCs have started to move to the mainstream and increasingly resembling more traditional courses, especially as a significant number of MOOCs are shorter versions of many traditional courses, and often delivered by highly qualified professors and academics whose research and academic expertise underpins the course on a MOOC.

Some of the MOOCs, such as EdX, continually research their courses to better understand how participants learn and explore ways of using the technology to transform and further enhance the learning and online experience for the participantsmoocs1.

Major MOOCs
Coursera (www.coursera.org), established by two Stanford University professors, is currently the biggest MOOC platform providing 212 different courses in such areas as: economics and business, computer sciences, biology, social sciences, music and film, medicine, health, food and nutrition, physical and earth sciences. Coursera has a consortium of 33 of the most well-known and highly regarded universities in the world delivering free online courses including Harvard, Stanford, Pennsylvania, Washington, London, Edinburgh, Toronto and Melbourne.

Udacity (www.udacity.com) has a focus on computer science courses and provides a range of topics from beginner courses to intermediate and advanced courses.

EdX (www.edx.org), owned by the prestigious academic institutions Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, draws content from a selection of their highly regarded courses.

Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) is a MOOC platform for young learners from kindergarten to Year 12 with courses centred on mathematics and science: biology, chemistry and physics, as well as some elements of economics and history.

FutureLearn (www.futurelearn.com) is the newest significant player reflecting how MOOCs are constantly changing. FutureLearn comprises a consortium of 12 major UK universities including The Open University, which has considerable experience in distance and online education, Birmingham, Warwick, Cardiff, Leeds, Bristol and St Andrews. Their web site is live but the courses and content are still being developed.

In addition, many high profile and elite universities are now offering their standard courses as open courses where people can watch the lectures online and access course slides and materials. To achieve the formal qualification people need to apply and enrol with the respective universities, pay the program fees and satisfactorily complete the assessment requirements associated with each course.

Participating in a MOOC
Participants complete a simple online registration for a course that interests them. They might want to learn more about a particular topic or it could be an introduction to consider a future study option or a possible formal university program or career direction. Each course on a MOOC is open for people over the age of 18 and, with parental approval, young learners over the age of 13. Coursera also asks participants to agree to an honour code that all the homework, quizzes and exams is their own work and that they won’t cheat or do anything that could dishonestly improve their results or dishonestly affect another person’s results.

When registering for a MOOC, participants are advised they are registering for a course and not enrolling with any of the universities delivering the courses. The courses are free and most materials and notes can be down-loaded from the course site. Occasionally other resources are recommended, such as additional books and reference materials for particular courses which can be purchased, but they are rarely prescribed as part of a course. A growing number of MOOCs offer a certificate signed by the lecturer once participants satisfactorily complete the course and there may be a fee for the certificate.

Until recently MOOCs have not provided participants with credit for further or higher education programs. However this is an area many universities are now considering, especially as one university in the US, Antioch University in Los Angeles, has started providing credit for selected MOOCs into specified college courses. Many overseas participants, especially in India, are seeking credit for their studies through MOOCs. While most MOOCs incorporate regular self-tests, projects and compulsory exams, universities are still exploring how participants can demonstrate mastery of a topic in order to be able to grant credit for the MOOC study. The American Council on Education is currently investigating a means of accrediting selected MOOCs for credit towards higher education courses.

moocs2How MOOCs Work
MOOCs allow a single teacher/lecturer to teach thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of participants in a single course delivery. With this size class, there is little participant contact with the lecturers, although some have scheduled times when they join online forums with participants to discuss various aspects of a course or provide further explanation on a topic.

MOOCs are often four to six weeks duration and the course format involves participants watching a series of short videos prepared by the lecturer detailing a particular topic theme for each of the specified weeks of the course. The format uses asynchronous learning so that participants can view the video at times that best suit them as well as their time zone. During each topic there are usually online tests that allow participants to respond and check their understanding of the concept or information presented.

In some courses participants are required to write an essay or more detailed response instead of an online multiple choice exam. In these cases, some MOOCs arrange for participants to forward their papers to five other participants for peer assessment and marking. This approach allows each participant to receive feedback and critique from five other participants. A lecturer may moderate an assessment where the spread of grades is diverse or a particular participant has a reputation for marking harshly.

The key to MOOC success is interaction among participants. Participants have interactive online tests during a course and then they will often post comments in online forums. Some MOOC lecturers try to organise face-to-face study groups in various physical locations or separate online forums for participants to promote learning and understanding through the sharing of ideas, perspectives and experiences with other participants.

MOOCs are based on Connectivism principles where learning and knowledge is created through connecting different people with a diversity of opinions. Technology is the enabler for MOOCs and with the growing use of smart phones and mobile computing, participants can maintain on-going connection with their MOOC class and interaction with other participants when they are at work, home, travelling and at any time of the day.

The Significance of MOOCs
  • MOOCs are accessible to virtually everybody who has access to the internet and the courses are free. This means there is no direct cost for a participant to explore a potential new area of interest or learning;
  • Learning occurs at times and locations that best suit the participant;
  • Participants interact with other people with a shared interest and are exposed to a diverse range of perspectives and ideas that can stimulate reflection and further interest in a topic;
  • Being part of a global class, participants can gain insight into attitudes, ideas, and trends among different populations and countries on a particular topic;
  • The continuing growth in the number of MOOCs will lead to significant choice and options for free online courses. This will allow learning and development to be tailored to the needs and/or interests of each participant;
  • MOOCs open a world of learning possibilities and promote lifelong learning for all those who are interested, able and motivated to participate;
  • Although some critics of MOOCs claim there is a low completion rate for courses, this has more positives than negatives. It means that people are interested in the concept of MOOCs and willing to investigate online learning, which most people would not have experienced previously. It also means that people have the opportunity to explore a topic without being committed to it and incurring significant costs as happens with many undergraduate programs.
  • Those people participating in a MOOC who do not complete a course are not precluding somebody else who wanted to participate but did not meet the selection criteria or cut-off levels.
Implications of MOOCs
Participants:
  • The opportunity to learn something new or completely different from their normal discipline;
  • The opportunity to appraise higher education or a specific topic without the need to apply and enrol with an educational institution and incur course fees;
  • The opportunity to learn through interacting with other participants from diverse backgrounds, experiences and countries;
  • Everybody has an equal opportunity to interact online compared to on-campus lectures which some participants find intimidating speaking or asking questions in large groups;
  • MOOCs could be used as an introduction to certain topics that lead to further study and possibly advanced standing in further education programs, subject to assessment of mastery at a prescribed level. This could reduce the duration and costs associated with completing a formal qualification.
Higher Education Providers:
  • Some higher education providers may see MOOCs as a threat, particular those who regard lectures and course materials as their intellectual property and only accessible to fee paying students;
  • Other higher education providers will see MOOCs as the opportunity to showcase some of their courses and use the MOOCs as a means of attracting new participants to undertake studies;
  • Need to develop a system for assessing student mastery of certain MOOCs and provide credit or advanced standing for participants applying for higher education programs. Participants completing a number of MOOCs and able to demonstrate mastery of the topic also demonstrate commitment to study and are likely to complete formal qualifications;
  • Should promote the environment and resources of their university, student experience and value of the qualification for participants who progress from a MOOC to enrolling in a formal university program.
Industry:
  • Employers could utilise MOOCs as part of the learning and development of employees. Those employees that show real interest, commitment and motivation for certain areas of studying could then be supported by their employer to enrol in further studies in areas relating to their employment and career development;
  • Some organisations and industries could use a series of MOOCs, selecting the most appropriate courses from a number of MOOC aggregators, as a pre-qualification for people applying to work in a particular industry, in addition to or instead of a university degree.
Employee Development Potential
MOOCs provide employers with the opportunity to develop an integrated organisation development plan and tailor a learning and development plan for each employee. Such a plan might comprise:
  • One or a series of MOOCs on topics relevant to each employee’s development needs;
  • Work-based projects that enable employees to learn and immediately apply their learning, which promotes greater understanding of concepts and better retention of the learning;
  • A mentor for each employee to discuss their work-based projects, workplace issues and career development options;
  • TED videos (Ideas Worth Spreading) to stimulate ideas, thinking and discussion within an organisation and/or workgroup;
  • YouTube-Education videos with specific topics and speakers used for employees to watch and then discuss or lead discussions with work colleagues.

The above integrated approach to employee learning and skills development could apply to all employees, from frontline, through supervisor and middle management, up to senior managers and executives.

Final Comment
MOOCs have been described in some circles as the biggest development in education for 200 years. It would appear that MOOCs are a win-win for participants, higher education providers and industry.

However, the unanswered question is: if MOOCs are free how do they pay for themselves? At this stage the universities involved in launching MOOCs seem to be following the approach adopted by one of the most successful companies of the digital age: Google. As identified by Jeff Jarvis, Google banks users, not money. When Google rolls-out a new product they worry about whether they will have users. If they have users, the money will follow (Jarvis, Jeff, (2009) What Would Google Do?, HarperCollins, New York).

About the Author
Dr Lindsay Ryan is Director of Corporate Education Advisers.
Lindsay is a thought leader, adviser and mentor to organisations assisting with organisational development and employee learning that enables organisations to develop their capability and capacity. Utilising leading-edge research, Lindsay assists organisations adopt a strategic approach to their corporate education to ensure employee training and development aligns with their goals and strategic direction. Based in Adelaide, Australia, Lindsay’s work is highly regarded internationally and he is also Visiting Fellow in Corporate Education with Birmingham City Business School in the United Kingdom.

CONTACT DETAILS:
(61) 0418 809 170
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EAIR 35th Annual Forum Rotterdam 2013 - Registration Now Open

eairThe EAIR Forum 2013 Rotterdam Forum Programme Committee and the EAIR Executive Board is delighted to hereby inform all colleagues and friends of EAIR and everyone that is interested in EAIR, that the official registration for the 35th Annual EAIR Forum “The Impact of Higher Education: Addressing the Challenges of the 21st Century” is open.

The 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum will take place from Wednesday 28 August till Saturday 31 August 2013 at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Please note: The early bird registration deadline is closing on 1 July 2013 so make sure your Forum registration is done in time! For the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum registration form, please go to: EAIR Registration.

For more information regarding the Forum registration, please go to the Conference website. Information about the preliminary timetable, hotels, travel, academic events, social events, tracks and keynote speakers can be found on the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum website.

The Erasmus University is centrally located near the river in one of the most vibrant cities of the Netherlands. Being the main port of Europe, Rotterdam is a multicultural experience with outstanding museums and restaurants and well known for its modern architecture. The Erasmus University itself has a world wide reputation in the areas of economics, business administration and health, strengthened by law, social sciences, history and arts, and philosophy. Students from all over the world follow Dutch and English language bachelor’s programmes as the basis for leading international master’s specialisations at the interface of economics, health and society.

Please visit http://www.eair.nl/forum/rotterdam regularly for the updated news about the 2013 EAIR Rotterdam Forum.

Can Business Education Change the World? We Think So!

gbsnmbalogoThe Global Business School Network is once again challenging business and entrepreneurship students and recent graduates to show how they are using their business skills to make a difference in the developing world. The MBA+ Challenge Video Contest is now it its third year and has been opened up to ALL students, undergraduate, graduate and certificate programs in addition to traditional MBAs.

The MBA+ Challenge Video Contest asks students to produce a short (3 minutes or less) video showing how they are using their business education to make a difference in the developing world through:

  • New business ventures
  • Student projects
  • Volunteer work
  • Impactful Careers
Any student who is currently in school or who has graduated in the past 5 years is eligible to enter.  The submission period for videos is March 1st – 31st with online voting from April 1 – 14th to  determine the top 5 videos.

The first prize is an all expenses paid trip for one team member to the GBSN Annual Conference and 10th Anniversary Celebration in Tunisia June 10 – 12, 2013.  They’ll also be featured on GBSN’s website, have the opportunity to blog for nextbillion.net and get visibility for their work around the globe. The top 5 finalists as determined by online voting will each have the opportunity for an online mentoring session with a world leader in business or development. The distinguished list of mentors will be released soon, so stay tuned.

A panel of judges will then determine the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place videos from the 5 finalists.

Click here to watch the winning video from 2012 from Tuck School of Business students called "The $300 House Project"

Full details on how you can take part can be found via - www.gbsnonline.org/mbachallenge

Innovation Beyond Technology within the Asia-Pacific Region - EFMD supports the AAPBS Annual Meeting

aapbsbannerEFMD is supporting the AAPBS Annual Meeting - “Innovation Beyond Technology within the Asia-Pacific Region" on the 27-28 of November in Kuala Lumpur hosted by the International Business School, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM-IBS).

The theme, ‘Innovation Beyond Technology’, is timely given the increased challenges in the business and management education landscape. Accelerating economic growth in the region, increased demands for quality management education, heightened competition among program providers, depleting federal funding, diversity of consumer profiles are some of the challenges that business schools are forced to face and address. Innovation is a must if business schools want to prosper in this environment.

The meeting provides a platform for AAPBS members and participants to exchange ideas and share best practices about how the business schools in the Asia Pacific region may pursue innovation. Members and participants may expect fruitful discussions on innovative areas in school governance, management, teaching and learning, research and publications, student services and funding models for the cost sustainability of business schools. It is hoped that the meeting will contribute to AAPBS’ continuous efforts towards the advancement of business and management education in the Asia Pacific region, create a solid Asian business and management education model, and establish constructive collaborations among the participants.

"One thing that is certain is that UTM-IBS is looking forward to showering you with Malaysian hospitality", Professor Dr. Mohd Hassan Bin Mohd Osman, Dean, UTM-IBS

Professor Michael Osbadeston, Director of Quality Service at EFMD will be speaking in one of the plenary sessions on "Innovations in Business Schools". The full conference programme and speakers details are available via these links - AAPBS programme & AAPBS speakers.

For details on registration please visit - AAPBS registration. If you have any questions or require further information please contact - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: copies available to order now

prmeguideThe Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME: Placing sustainability at the heart of management education, created by the UN Global Compact initiative, Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) was presented at the Rio+20 Earth Summit in June 2012 and is now offered for sale in print for the first time by publishers, GSE Research.

The book features 63 case studies from 47 institutions, representing 25 countries across Asia, Oceania, Latin America, USA and Canada, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The business schools’ experiences are classified into six sections, corresponding to the Six Principles of PRME (Purpose, Values, Method, Research, Partnership, and Dialogue) and offering useful advice on setting up and implementing specific aspects of each. This important compilation will be an inspiration for all forward-thinking Business Schools across the world, especially those who are keen to embrace the PRME principles and put sustainability at the heart of their operations.

“Seeking to inspire the further integration of responsible management education, real world examples are highlighted from around the globe on fostering a sustainability culture, changing curricula, enabling faculty or managing and consolidating. This is a unique publication in that the 63 cases illustrate successful and relevant approaches in their different contexts, moreover the standardised structure around challenges, actions taken and results provides the most effective source of inspiration. A must-read on the transformation of management education and on how our institutions are placing sustainability at the heart of management education.”
Prof. Eric Cornuel, CEO & Director General of EFMD

The guide is now available to purchase in print, priced at £29.95 (excluding shipping). To purchase your copy of the Inspirational Guide, please visit the GSE online shop: http://www.gsepublishing.com

For more information on PRME visit - http://www.unprme.org/index.php

What Do Companies Need from an Executive Training Programme in Japan and Korea?

logo-etpSHARE YOUR VIEWS ON COMPANIES’ NEEDS FOR THE STAFF TRAINING
The aim of this on-line consultation is to gather the EU companies’ opinion on their specific needs and requirements with regards to specialised long-term training, as well their expectations and willingness to send key staff members on the training programmes. Please fill out the online questionnaire which should take you no more than 5 to 10 minutes.

The survey has been developed in relation to the EU-funded Executive Training Programme in Japan and Korea which aims to support EU companies and their executives to develop their business plan and build knowledge of Japanese / Korean business practices, culture and language in order to succeed in the Japanese and Korean markets. The results of the survey will allow the European Commission to further improve the programme with EU companies’ expectations in a continuously changing environment.

What is the Executive Training Programme?

Since 1979, the European Commission’s Executive Training Programme (ETP) has helped over 800 European companies and 1000 European executives to succeed in the Japanese and South Korean markets by providing intensive language and business training for their executives.

Following the successful selection of candidates for the 2012 cycle of Executive Training Programme (ETP) which will start this November, applications are now open for the 2013 cycle of this prestigious business support and executive training programme.

The ETP enables EU companies and their executives to develop their business plan and build knowledge of Japanese / Korean business practices, culture and language, as well as their networks in order to succeed in these Asian markets. The selected participants, who will be granted a scholarship, will follow an intensive business and language training at the internationally recognised universities in Japan / Korea, including an internship in a local company.

EU executives can apply by submitting an online application via http://www.euetp.eu.

Why participate in the Executive Training Programme?
  • On average, participant companies’ related turnover increases two fold within ten years of completing ETP
  • More than 65% of ETP alumni proceed to become top executives within their companies
  • Executives from 15 of the top 20 European companies have taken part in ETP
  • The training is given by prestigious and internationally recognised universities and leads to real business opportunities
Financial support
- Funding for the entire training course in Japan or Korea
- A scholarship of 2,200€ per month for Japan or 2,000€ per month for Korea

Further information
The deadline for applications for the next ETP cycle 2013-2014 is 31st May 2013. Enroll now on www.euetp.eu

Last chance to enter the 2012 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards

emerald logoEFMD & Emerald Group Publishing Limited seek to celebrate excellence in research by sponsoring the 2012 Emerald/EFMD Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards.

Award-winning entries will receive a cash prize of €1,500 (or currency equivalent), a certificate, a winners' logo to attach to correspondence and the prospect of an offer of publication in the sponsoring journal - either as a full paper or an executive summary - at the discretion of the Editor(s). In addition, a number of Highly Commended Awards will be bestowed. This year there are 12 categories:

Interdisciplinary accounting research
Category sponsored by Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal

Marketing research
Category sponsored by European Journal of Marketing

Hospitality management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management

Operations and production management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Operations & Production Management

Logistics and supply chain management
Category sponsored by International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management

Information science
Category sponsored by Journal of Documentation

Educational leadership and strategy
Category sponsored by Journal of Educational Administration

Knowledge management
Category sponsored by Journal of Knowledge Management

Management and governance
Category sponsored by Management Decision

Human resource management
Category sponsored by Personnel Review

Leadership and organization development
Category sponsored by Leadership & Organization Development Journal

Health Care Management
Category sponsored by Journal of Health Organisation and Management

If you are unsure of which category to submit to please feel free to contact us, and after consultation with our Editorial team, we can suggest that which is most appropriate.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the Awards, the research must address an issue that is of importance to one of the various subject areas listed above. The Awards are open to those who have completed and satisfied examination requirements for a Doctoral award, or will do so, between 1 October 2009 and 1 October 2012, and have not applied previously for one of these Awards.

Submission requirements
1. Researchers must apply online using the application form at: http://ww2.emeraldinsight.com/awards/odra.htm
2. The following documents will be required electronically:
  • Covering letter – as part of this please state whether or not your doctoral research has been published and/or will be published in any form (conference paper, article, peer reviewed journal, etc)
  • Executive Summary – paper that summarises the Doctoral research. The Executive Summary should not exceed 1,000 words (reference lists and presentation of data, as either Tables or Figures, do not count towards this total).
  • Letter of recommendation/reference from a supervisor/senior faculty member. For short-listed applicants, further contact may be made with the referee.
  • Contact details of external examiner(s).
3. Applicants must only submit to one category.

Judging criteria
The entries will be judged by the Editor(s) and at least one Editorial Advisory Board member of the sponsoring journal. Entries will be judged on the following criteria:

1. Significance/implications for theory and practice.
2. Originality and innovation.
3. Appropriateness and application of the methodology.
4. Analysis and presentation of the data.
5. Quality of the literature review.

Short-listed applicants may be required to answer further questions as appropriate from the judging panel. Winners will be required to submit an unpublished paper, sole- or joint-authored, derived from the research, within six months of winning the Award. The Editors reserve the right not to select a winning paper if, in their judgment, none of the entries is considered satisfactory.

Please note that the decision of the judges is final. Due to the large number of submissions, applicants will not receive any feedback.

Key dates
The closing date for applications is 1 October 2012.

Winners will be announced in January 2013.

Contact details
For further information or if you have any queries, please contact:

Emma Stevenson
External Relations Executive
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Howard House
Wagon Lane
Bingley BD16 1WA
United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1274 785198
Fax: +44 (0)1274 785200
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.